The Latest

3 Ways to Outsmart Your Inner Critic

By Christa Smith Psy.D. on April 30, 2015 in Shift
You can’t please your inner critic but you can outsmart it.

Optogenetics Allow Neuroscientists to Turn Fear Off and On

Neuroscientists at MIT have discovered how to turn the neural circuitry of fear conditioning on and off. This could lead to better treatments for PTSD, anxiety disorders, and avoidance learning.

A Workover: Be an ADHD Coach or Occupational Therapist?

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on April 30, 2015 in How To Do Life
Advice I gave to a caller to my NPR-San Francisco radio program.

New Film Features a Borderline Woman Who Starts a TV Show

By Randi Kreger on April 29, 2015 in Stop Walking on Eggshells
When Alice wins the Mega-Millions lottery in the new film "Welcome to Me," she quits her psychiatric meds and buys her own talk show hoping to be the next Oprah.

Do Alzheimer's Patients Have the Right to Say Yes to Sex?

The right to love is considered to be an essential human right; however, one exception that often prevails is in cases of Alzheimer’s patients. The case of Henry Rayhons, who was charged with sexually abusing his wife Donna, is such a striking example; Can people who are unable to recognize their own children give their sound sexual consent?

The Psychology of Conspiracy and Cover-Ups

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in A Sideways View
Who is being most naïve, those who tend to believe in conspiracy theories or those who don't? What are the characteristics of those who tend to have a conspiracist view of the world?

Lucky Man

By Susan Hooper on April 29, 2015 in Detours and Tangents
My grandfather died suddenly in his fifties from a heart attack, leaving behind a wife and four sons. But years earlier he had sidestepped death on the Titanic and possibly the Lusitania, too. Did he die prematurely or did he have the good fortune to live far beyond the number of years the Fates had originally allotted him?

Adventures in Allergy

When patients say they are "allergic" to something, they do not necessarily mean the same thing that doctors have in mind when they use the word. And vice versa.

Hearing Music in Baltimore

By Kimberly Sena Moore on April 29, 2015 in Your Musical Self
The response of the Boston Symphony Orchestra was more than just a "feel good" nicety. Here's why.

Your Brain Never Stops Playing the Confidence Game

By David DiSalvo on April 29, 2015 in Neuronarrative
We seem to be equipped with a way to detect the level of confidence embedded in others’ voices, and even a loud tone—if lacking the confidence intangible—isn’t likely to cause much more than irritation.

You Are What You Speak

By David Ludden Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Talking Apes
When bilinguals switch from one language to another, they shift their personalities as well.
Smart Leaders Know They Need to Put Their Phones Away

Smart Leaders Know They Need to Put Their Phones Away

By Craig Dowden Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in The Leader's Code
How smartphones can undermine the most important relationships of our lives.

Getting to the Goal

By Seth Slater M.F.A. on April 29, 2015 in The Dolphin Divide
How focusing on the positive helps us overcome obstacles. What we want is often more powerful than what we fear. But if we’re not careful in how we frame our goals, we may be setting ourselves up for disappointment—and inadvertently turn our fears into reality.

Are Killers Born or Made? Both

By Temma Ehrenfeld on April 29, 2015 in Open Gently
A loving childhood can turn a natural-born killer into an aggressive but law-abiding guy.

How to Build Rapport: A Powerful Technique

By Aldo Civico Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Turning Point
Knowing how to build rapport is at the root of our personal and professional success. Here is a powerful technique you can practice right away, as soon as you finish reading this article.

Why Women Put Themselves Down

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Good Thinking
Women usually respond to compliments by putting themselves down. Research shows that the reason for this is not low self-esteem or self-hatred. Instead, it is something far more subtle, strategic...and powerful.

Care for Nepal

Irrelationship is a shared defensive system that serves the purpose of shielding the participants from true connection. How might this be relevant for something as seemingly clear-cut as disaster response where responders and organizations trying to help are acting from altruistic motives? What can irrelationship tell us about care for the caretaker in disaster relief?

The Psychological Damage of Alcohol Abuse Can Be Lethal

The social and psychological consequences of alcohol abuse can be deadly.
The Psychology of Climate Change Denial

The Psychology of Climate Change Denial

By Steve Taylor Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Out of the Darkness
Climate scientists are almost unanimously convinced of the reality of man-made global warming. But only 50% of Americans believe in it. What are the psychological reasons for this discrepancy?

Wife Swapping in the Stone Age

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in The Human Beast
Anthropologists are all too familiar with the violence and bloodshed triggered by marital infidelity. Now they are coming to terms with a more mysterious phenomenon—consensual wife sharing. If a man flies into homicidal rages when his wife cheats on him, why would he encourage another man to sleep with her?

Is It Ethical for Professors to Assign Their Own Books?

Lots of people—students, friends, colleagues, and publishing professionals—who think it’s automatically a conflict of interest for professors to assign their own books. But is it an unethical conflict of interest? Does the base motive for money unduly contaminate the noble motives to help students?

Secret of Adulthood: Lose Yourself to Find Yourself.

By Gretchen Rubin on April 29, 2015 in The Happiness Project
Sometimes we have to lose our way in order to find our way.

A Social Network for Depression

It's become more common to question the good of technology we use every day. Are we glued to our devices to the detriment of our real-life relationships? Does our scrolling through Facebook help us feel more connected, or feel worse about our own lives?

Two Things Children Should Know about Grief

By Nancy Berns Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Freedom to Grieve
Do not think you have to have all the pain go away before you can have fun or even just go about your ordinary routine. You are not being disloyal to the person you miss if you are experiencing joy.
 Angry Tears

Angry Tears

It’s become increasingly common for therapists to note that underlying your anger are feelings of hurt. In fact the more pronounced your anger, the greater the hurt it conceals. So if the phrase “angry tears” sounds oxymoronic to you, that’s because it is: It’s profoundly descriptive of human experience yet, on the face of it, certainly seems contradictory. . . .

Spring Cleaning: Tips For Finally Clearing That Clutter

Clutter can paralyze and terrorize, to the point where you give up and resign yourself to living with its oppressive, stressful presence. Here are some simple strategies to get rid of existing clutter and change the habits that create it in the first place.

Does Training Make Your Dog Smarter?

Dogs that have been trained to high levels of performance in any of a number of skills (e.g., agility, schutzhund, search and rescue, retrieving, musical freestyle, etc.) become better problem solvers on totally unrelated tasks.

Captive Killer Whales Die Much Younger than Wild Orcas

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Animal Emotions
A new study shows captive killer whales don't live as long as wild relatives. The researchers show that "62 to 81 percent of wild female killer whales live at least 15 years. In contrast, only 27 percent of the now-dead females in the captive study survived that long. Roughly half of the still-living captive female whales are at least 15 years old."

Why We Still Need Mental Health Awareness Month, for Now

So it’s national Mental Health Month… Guest post By Aaron Krasner, M.D.

The Future of Crowdsourcing in the Classroom

By Thomas Hills Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Statistical Life
The notion that we live in an increasingly consumer-based culture is not new, but the capacity for computers to reduce students to point-and-click robots in complicated virtual Skinner boxes should not be lost. Students are at risk of being increasingly met with boilerplate environments that are designed to reduce knowledge to its most clickable form.