Female Therapists in 03245

Photo of Leah DuBois, Clinical Social Work/Therapist in 03245, NH
Leah DuBois
Clinical Social Work/Therapist, LICSW
Verified Verified
1 Endorsed
Holderness, NH 03245
When I took my first sociology and psychology class in undergraduate school, I learned that I was fascinated with people, groups of people and social systems and how they all work together to develop the person and mind. I have worked in many different settings helping children, adolescents, and adults meet their goals. I have worked therapeutic residential settings, community mental health settings, community-based services settings and the academic setting providing services to individuals and families for the last 7 years.
When I took my first sociology and psychology class in undergraduate school, I learned that I was fascinated with people, groups of people and social systems and how they all work together to develop the person and mind. I have worked in many different settings helping children, adolescents, and adults meet their goals. I have worked therapeutic residential settings, community mental health settings, community-based services settings and the academic setting providing services to individuals and families for the last 7 years.
(802) 432-2857 View (802) 432-2857
Photo of Regina Eastman, Counselor in 03245, NH
Regina Eastman
Counselor, Dr (C), MA, LCMHC, SEP, LMT
Verified Verified
Holderness, NH 03245
Supporting individuals toward their sense of wholeness is my therapeutic purpose. Every individual has their own journey; a path of unfolding understanding through their processes of the body, mind and emotion. My therapeutic approach is integrative, meaning the whole being - one's body, emotion, cognition and the being's essence (spirit/soul) are important variables in the process of wellness and healing. When appropriate, and consent is given, therapeutic touch is a supportive modality to support the Client in accessing bodily held, maladaptive and traumatic experiences.
Supporting individuals toward their sense of wholeness is my therapeutic purpose. Every individual has their own journey; a path of unfolding understanding through their processes of the body, mind and emotion. My therapeutic approach is integrative, meaning the whole being - one's body, emotion, cognition and the being's essence (spirit/soul) are important variables in the process of wellness and healing. When appropriate, and consent is given, therapeutic touch is a supportive modality to support the Client in accessing bodily held, maladaptive and traumatic experiences.
(603) 932-6709 View (603) 932-6709
Female Therapists

Does it matter what gender my therapist is?

In general, this is not an important factor, as there is no relationship between a therapist’s gender and their efficacy. Some clients, however, prefer to see therapists of a particular gender, whether due to their own past experiences with men and women, or ingrained beliefs about how people of different genders think and behave. Exploring the roots of such preferences and considering what one wants to address in therapy can help someone determine whether their therapist’s gender truly matters to them.

Should I see a female therapist?

Many people—not just women—prefer to see a female therapist, either because they believe that a woman will be able to relate to their specific challenges (for example, sexism in the workplace) or because they imagine feeling more comfortable disclosing sensitive information to a woman. Such beliefs may not turn out to be accurate, however, and adhering too rigidly to a gender preference can at times hinder a client from finding the best therapeutic match.

Do therapists get specific training to help with women’s concerns?

Therapists are trained to provide care to clients of any gender. However, some therapists—both men and women—may pursue additional training in feminist therapy, gender-specific issues, or women’s mental health. Female clients may wish to ask prospective therapists whether they have received specific training in the client’s primary area(s) of concern, or whether they have worked extensively with women on issues similar to their own.

How can I inquire about a therapist’s experience in treating women?

It’s OK—even encouraged!—to ask a therapist directly whether and how often they have treated women in the past, or whether they have treated women dealing with the client’s most prominent concern(s). Competent therapists will be happy to share their educational background, preferred treatment modalities, and prior client experience to help an individual find the therapist best suited to their needs.