Anger Management Support Groups in Detroit, MI

Anger Management
Hosted by Cynthia R Finnegan
Clinical Social Work/Therapist, LMSW, QMHP
Verified Verified
Group meets in Detroit, MI 48219
(313) 251-0614 View (313) 251-0614
Anger management
Hosted by John A Dandridge
Clinical Social Work/Therapist, MSW, LMSW
Verified Verified
Group meets in Detroit, MI 48235
(313) 329-6303 View (313) 329-6303
Anger Management Group
Learn to manage anger effectively. Stop violence or the threat of violence. Develop self-control over thoughts and actions. Receive support from others
Hosted by Tina D Ealey
Counselor, MA, LLPC
Verified Verified
Group meets in Detroit, MI 48234
Learn to manage anger effectively. Stop violence or the threat of violence. Develop self-control over thoughts and actions. Receive support from others
(313) 921-6282 View (313) 921-6282

More Groups Nearby

Anger Management
Hosted by Cynthia R Finnegan
Clinical Social Work/Therapist, LMSW, QMHP
Verified Verified
Group meets in Detroit, MI 48219
(313) 251-0614 View (313) 251-0614
Anger management
Hosted by John A Dandridge
Clinical Social Work/Therapist, MSW, LMSW
Verified Verified
Group meets in Detroit, MI 48235
(313) 329-6303 View (313) 329-6303
Anger Management Group
Learn to manage anger effectively. Stop violence or the threat of violence. Develop self-control over thoughts and actions. Receive support from others
Hosted by Tina D Ealey
Counselor, MA, LLPC
Verified Verified
Group meets in Detroit, MI 48234
Learn to manage anger effectively. Stop violence or the threat of violence. Develop self-control over thoughts and actions. Receive support from others
(313) 921-6282 View (313) 921-6282
Anger Management Group
This anger management group is geared toward helping clients gain insight into their physical and behavioral responses to anger. I help clients identify triggers and early waning signs of anger, which may be difficult for them to identify independently. I ...
Hosted by Juanita D Hinton
Clinical Social Work/Therapist, MSW, LMSW
Verified Verified
Group meets in Allen Park, MI 48101
This anger management group is geared toward helping clients gain insight into their physical and behavioral responses to anger. I help clients identify triggers and early waning signs of anger, which may be difficult for them to identify independently. I ...
(734) 530-4371 View (734) 530-4371
Anger Management
We provide simplified learning materials in order to assist clients to recognize signs that will lead to anger. We help clients learn tools that will help them create a calm attitude and deal with the situation in a positive way. ...
Hosted by The Anger Doctor / Balance Life Mind & Well-Being
Counselor, MA, EdD
Verified Verified
Group meets in Ferndale, MI 48220
We provide simplified learning materials in order to assist clients to recognize signs that will lead to anger. We help clients learn tools that will help them create a calm attitude and deal with the situation in a positive way. ...
(313) 474-6805 View (313) 474-6805
Anger Management Support Groups

How long does therapy take for anger management?

Treatment duration depends on the person’s specific challenges and circumstances. There are treatments for anger problems that are shorter and more goal-oriented, like Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), which can last weeks to months. Others, like Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) may last between six months and a year, while a more intensive treatment, like psychodynamic therapy, is open-ended, and clients may see their therapist for a year or longer.

How do you know if you need therapy for anger management?

Everyone gets mad from time to time. But when angry outbursts become frequent and cause damage to relationships, whether at home or in the office, it may be a good time to look into therapy. A therapist can assess where a client’s anger may be coming from, suggest strategies for averting angry outbursts, and help a client create a plan to become a calmer version of themselves.

Is there medication for anger management?

Medications do exist that help people mitigate the feeling of anger, but these are reserved for people with anger-related psychiatric disorders, such as intermittent explosive disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, or in some cases borderline personality disorder. In these cases, antidepressant medications may be prescribed to help with the client’s symptoms. In most cases of anger management, however, talk therapy is the recommended treatment, along with lifestyle changes where relevant.

What’s the best way to encourage someone to seek help for anger issues?

It’s helpful to express your concern and love for the person while framing therapy as a tool for improving their life. Offering specific examples of how an individual’s behavior affected either themselves or others should be done with compassion and with empathy. It may be useful to devise a game plan—breaking the process down into parts, such as finding a therapist, making appointments, and looking into insurance coverage.