Jim Hopper, Ph.D.

Jim Hopper, Ph.D., is an independent consultant and Teaching Associate in Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry of Harvard Medical School. For over 25 years, his research, clinical, and consulting work has focused on the psychological and biological effects of sexual assault, child abuse, and other traumatic experiences. He consults and teaches nationally and internationally to civilian and military investigators, prosecutors, clinicians, victim advocates, military commanders, higher education administrators, and many others.

As a clinician, he works with adults who have experienced assault or were abused as children. In his forensic expert witness work, he testifies on the short- and long-term impacts of sexual assault and child abuse. He is also a meditator, primarily in the Vipassana tradition, and a co-editor of Mindfulness-Oriented Interventions for Trauma: Integrating Contemplative Practices (Guilford Press, 2015).

His nonprofit and policy work has included being a founding board member and long-time advisor of 1in6, an organization for men who’ve had unwanted or abusive sexual experiences and those who care about them; a board member of Stop It Now!, a child sexual abuse prevention organization; and a member of the Peace Corps Sexual Assault Advisory Council. He has created trainings on the neurobiology of sexual assault trauma for the Department of Justice’s Office for Victims and Crime and the Department of Defense’s Safe Helpline. He also wrote a section on brain-based sexual assault responses and memories for the next version of “Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) Toolkit,” distributed nationally by DOJ’s Office for Victims of Crime.

Hopper has written for The Washington Post and Time.com, and appeared in local and national print, radio and television media outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Scientific American.

Author of

Sexual Assault and the Brain

Understanding the brain under attack, and implications for justice and healing. Read now.

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