1) 'And a few lines under that, Hare refers to how psychopathy "in the absence of antisociality" exists but isn't that interesting.'

It seems we interpret this differently. I take it to mean, 'psychopathy [would become] a configuration of traits that is interesting to look at but that has little real world consequence, reducing psychopathy to a sort of boutique personality disorder.'

'However, many psychopaths never go to prison or any other facility. They appear to function reasonably well—as lawyers, doctors, psychiatrists, academics, mercenaries, police officers, cult leaders, military personnel, businesspeople, writers, artists, entertainers, and so forth—without breaking the law, or at least
without being caught and convicted. These individuals are every bit as egocentric, callous, and manipulative as the average criminal psychopath; however, their intelligence, family
background, social skills, and circumstances permit them to construct a facade of normalcy and to get what they want with relative impunity.....

Rather than refer to these individuals as successful psychopaths - after all, their success is often illusory and always at someone else's expense - I prefer to call them subcriminal psychopaths. Their conduct, although technically not illegal, typically violates conventional ethical standards, hovering just on the shady side of the law .... I am certain that if the families and friends of such individuals were willing to discuss their experiences without fear of retribution, we would uncover a rat's nest of emotional abuse, philandering, double-dealing, and generally shoddy behavior ....
'Without Conscience', Robert Hare
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2) 'There are many forms of antisocial behavior. Not all involve actively, deliberately wanting to hurt others and taking delight in their suffering.'

See quote from 'Without Conscience' above in 1), and below:

'The dominant idealization of the self is that of a predator, which diminishes rage and envy toward others; the dominant idealization of the object is one who will perfectly serve the interests of the psychopath, often as prey.'

'A Psychoanalytic View of the Psychopath', J. Reid Meloy, Ph.D.
San Diego Psychoanalytic Society and Institute
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'… the psychopathic character is bound to the pursuit of continual novelty in perception and relinquishes any hope of an enduring emotional attachment. This pursuit, moreover, is initially enhanced by the idealizing defenses, yet is quickly eroded by the devaluation that follows. …

Pleasure [for the psychopath] is distinguished by the presence of dominance-submission behavioral patterns, the use of dissociative defenses such as splitting to ward off painful affect [emotions], gratification of sadistic impulses through the intentional infliction of emotional or physical pain upon others, sexual and aggressive 'fueling' of the pleasurable event, and sensation seeking. Psychopaths do not experience pleasure by empathically responding to the joy in others. Their perception of others' pleasure arouses only envy and greed in themselves. [p 76]

'But why must the psychopath constantly devalue? If the devaluation does not occur the individual is vulnerable to conscious feelings of both envy and greed …'[p 94]

The conscious experience of exhilaration and contempt, which are usually simultaneous affective states in the psychopathic process and which may appear clinically as contemptuous delight ['duper's delight'] is a distinctive feature of psychopathy.'

'The psychopathic mind, origins, dynamics and treatment', J.Reid Meloy
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'The end result is that these women are perhaps the most damaged victim group from exposure to the most toxic (and often lethal) pathology. It reminds us why Public Psychopathy Education is so important in the world today because of toxic inevitable harm.'

Brown M.A., Sandra L. Women Who Love Psychopaths: Inside the Relationships of Inevitable Harm With Psychopaths, Sociopaths & Narcissists
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3) 'Look up what Hare, Kiehl, and others had to say about subcriminal psychopathy'

Point me in the right direction. From my quotes in in 1) and 2) I'm well aware of how high-functioning 'subcriminal' psychopaths operate.

Did you perhaps mean this?

'The premise of this book is that psychopaths do work in modern organizations; they often are successful by most standard measures of career success; and their destructive personality characteristics are invisible to most of the people with whom they interact. They are able to circumvent and sometimes hijack succession planning and performance management systems in order to give legitimacy to their behaviors. They take advantage of communication weaknesses, organizational systems and processes, interpersonal conflicts, and general stressors that plague all companies. They abuse coworkers and, by lowering morale and stirring up conflict, the company itself ...

Using a variety of influence tactics, the psychopaths manipulated their network of one-on-one personal bonds to gather information they could use to advance their own careers, derail the careers of rivals, or enlist technical support when the company made demands on them (to actually do their jobs). Specifically, their game plans involved manipulating communication networks to enhance their own reputation, to disparage others, and to create conflicts and rivalries among organization members, thereby keeping them from sharing information that might uncover the deceit.'
'Snakes in Suits', Babiak and Hare
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'What happens in that small group [or corporate high-flyers] is that the psychopath realizes that all of the other high-potentials are rivals, or potential rivals, and begins to take them out through manipulation, lying, backbiting, all of those kinds of behind-the-scenes activity. The organization then begins to lose this coterie of high-potential performers...'
Dr. Paul Babiak, 'I am Fishead' 25.40
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‘If you’re very bright, you know how to dress well, you have say the gift of the gab, you’re raised in an affluent family background, you don’t go into the bank and rob it, you get into the bank and become a director, if you’re fairly attractive that opens up all sorts of doors for you, if you’re intelligent even more doors. The combination of good looks, intelligence and lack of conscience is deadly.’
‘I psychopath’, Robert Hare, Section 2, 4.52,
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‘Psychopaths are perfectly tuned machines, the engine isn’t broken at all, it’s a Rolls-Royce of the evolutionary cheating strategy game … they play the game to the full’
‘I, Psychopath’, Dr. Adrain Raine
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4) 'Yes, nonsexual sadism as a personal trait often involves psychopathy, but they are definitely not the same thing.'

Psychopaths play games with people. That doesn't necessarily mean sadism, but more the thrill that a cat gets from playing with a mouse.

‘What they can do is they can mimic emotions, they can mimic a genuine interest in you, when in fact there’s really no interest, beyond the interest that a cat has in a mouse. Right? Think of the poor mouse. The mouse is saying, ‘Why is the cat doing that?’ And the cat is saying, ‘Ha ha, there’s a mouse.’ And he’s saying, ‘and I’m a cat and it’s a mouse and I do what cats do. That’s the psychopath.’
‘I Psychopath’, Robert Hare, section 8, 3 minutes in
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'With her emotionally frozen inability to leave, she becomes a toy that the psychopath bats around at will, tearing at the fabric of her soul like she is prey. Despite her ravaged psychological condition and the depth of depravity they experienced at the psychopath's hands, the women still described the decision to disconnect as 'excruciatingly difficult.' Competent women who are CEO's of companies become paranoid and believe that the psychopath will know when she attempts to leave-even if he
is out of town. Powerful female attorneys can't remember how to file a restraining order for themselves. Life saving doctors can't remember how to give themselves care. Insightful therapists can't identify the symptoms they are having and most of the women can't figure out how to leave or remain safe after they have left. This is not a testimony to her indecisiveness but a testimony to the power of a psychopath's influence to immobilize others ability to combat his evil in strategic ways.'
'Women who love psychopaths', Sandra Brown

5) 'Psychopathy, narcissism, and Machiavellianism overlap. They have characteristics in common, but they are not synonymous.'

I'm well aware of that.