Do You Spend Too Much Time on Social Media?

Learn how to regain balance while still enjoying your time online.

Posted May 08, 2020

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Source: Pexels

Social media has gained a lot of attention and popularity, especially during the pandemic. Many argue that a virtual connection is the next best thing to being in-person. The advances of modern technology do help us to spread important information and stay connected to those we love. In fact, even though we may be physically apart, we are able to close the gap on physical distancing by way of our technological connections. While a video chat pales in comparison to an in-person visit, we cannot ignore that connecting this way has many benefits. The key is to strike a delicate balance so that we embrace our social media interactions while still living our lives in the physical world.

A Time Zap

Social media has the overwhelming effect of zapping our time and emotional energy. It is not uncommon for people to spend hours each day scouring Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Social media does have the ability to connect us with like-minded individuals, friends, and loved ones so that we may share pictures and updates. However, what happens more likely than not is that social media drains us.

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Source: Pexels

Sometimes, we are so focused on taking a selfie of a meal, a concert, or a date that we forget to live in the moment and actually enjoy our time doing the activities that we love with the people who bring us joy.

Social media addiction is becoming more commonplace as smartphones replace live human contact.

Social media can even bring about feelings of distress, insecurity, anxiety, and depression. For instance, it is easy to feel that we are not keeping up with the Joneses when we see pictures of our friends in glamorous places while we’re busy with our not-so-glamorous lives. This leads us to doubt relationships and even brings some to fabricate their everyday activities so that they seem more exciting than they are in reality.

An Easy Fix

It is easy to clear and organize our feeds so that we can still participate in social media yet not suffer from the emotional drain and time-related strain. For instance, on Facebook, simply unfollow those friends whose posts cause you anxiety.

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Source: Pexels

A good game plan for some is to accept people’s requests to connect on social media. However, privately, mute or unfollow those who you really don’t need to read about on a daily basis. You can still search for them occasionally to see what they are up to. But, you will not be bombarded by posts that drain your time and energy.

Also, consider setting a timer when scouring your social media feeds. For instance, you might allot 10 minutes in the morning to check your accounts and respond to any pressing messages. Then, visit your accounts, again, for a few minutes during lunch or after work.

Check in with yourself regularly and adjust your social media usage as needed.

Copyright© 2020 Amy Cooper Hakim