Allison Carmen

Allison Carmen

The Gift of Maybe

Are You Too Focused on the Things That Bother You?

A path to finding more joy in each moment.

Posted May 06, 2016

fotolia, used with permission
Source: fotolia, used with permission

Last summer, one of my friends invited me to her house for the weekend.  As soon as we pulled up to her house, she started to yell about the weeds that were growing by her porch.  She spent the first 30 minutes of our arrival in a bad mood, complaining about the gardener not doing a proper job and how her husband should have taken care of the matter.

Interestingly, as we stepped out of the car, I was admiring the beautiful setting in which we’d be spending the weekend. Just getting out of the city and smelling the fresh air was a treat. Also, the house and yard were charming and had me thinking about how lucky my friend was to have such blessings in her life. I don't mean to say that my friend should not be upset about the weeds, but her reaction overshadowed all that was wonderful in that moment.

I returned home two days later. As I walked around the city on that very hot day, I noticed I was walking around thinking about everything that was wrong and bothered me. I had thoughts like, “The city is really too smelly on a hot day,” “This restaurant should have better air conditioning,” “That store has a distasteful display” and “Green is an ugly color for that car.” I had walked by beautiful buildings, lovely shops, neighbors, and so much more, but I was only thinking about the stuff that bothered me or that did not fit how I like things to be.

All of a sudden, I realized I am no different than my friend. I was hot and bothered and searching for all the things that were not right. These thoughts were not the big issues in my life, but were creating some negativity and keeping me focused on being hot and cranky.

At that moment, I caught myself and decided to actively search for beautiful things for the next few minutes. I saw a mother walking with her adorable child, I smelled the fresh juices from a raw foods restaurant, I admired the colorful apples in a bin outside a grocery store and noticed all the beautiful flowers in front of an Italian restaurant at which I had never eaten.

I immediately felt more joyous. Sure I was still hot, but I just kept looking for the beautiful block after block. After a while I expanded my mindset to include things I saw that I wasn’t sure about or that might normally bother me. I decided to see it all as interesting and to be more curious. I noticed that when it is really hot outside, an iced coffee tastes like heaven, people are more likely to speak to you in Washington Square Park in the heat than in the cold, and the architecture of the hotel across the street is stunning. I even took a peek in the “ugly” window display of that store and noticed some lovely original art work with vibrant colors. It made me smile.

This simple exercise really changed the quality of my moment and created a better mindset for the day.  You can try it while at home, with your friends, at work, or just walking down the street. Here are some examples:  

  • Home. If you are sitting at home or doing chores, focus on everything that is clean or is working well. This way the little mishaps or messes won't bother you as much and you can enjoy everything else. If something is broken, try to see it as interesting or try being curious. My dishwasher was leaking two times in six months. When the repairman came the second time, I decided to be curious instead of upset about my resulting slightly warped floor. I learned about the different parts of the machine and found new ways to load and care for it. Sure, I would rather have had a working dishwasher, but I tried my best and did get something out of it. 
  • Relationships. If you are with a friend who says something at lunch that hurts you, try to remember the rest of your conversation as well.  Sometimes we get stuck on the one thing a person said that caused hurt and forget everything they said that was positive. You can also do this with your children or your spouse.  We can harp on things about them that upset or aggravate us or search for the good stuff too. Often we forget that people around us have some beautiful qualities and we stop enjoying them because we don't look beyond the stuff that bothers us. 
  • Work. Instead of focusing on how annoying or rude your co-worker is, look for her/his good qualities. Try to see the benefits of a project you are working on instead of dreading the long hours it will take to complete. Try to create new ways to approach routine tasks. Maybe being more curious will enable you to see something interesting that you never noticed before. Work can sometimes be a tough environment for a new perspective, but keep at it. You might even find you become more productive when you are willing to see everything with a different state of mind.
  • Walking or Shopping. As for our walks or time shopping, look for what is pleasing, different or fascinating  I sometime walk around and say to myself, “that is beautiful,” “that is interesting” or “I wonder how that works.” It makes my walk intriguing and more joyous. The quality of my time out in the world greatly improves when I remain open minded and curious, trying new foods and meeting more people.  I also tend not to think about my daily stress and worry because I am busy experiencing the moment from a better vantage point. 

It is truly amazing how much joy and possibility you can add to your life when you shift your mindset to see all that is beautiful or interesting. Maybe give it a try and let me know how you do!