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27 Quotes on the Olympics

Learn about what it takes, and how it feels, to be in the Olympics.

Learn about what it takes, and how it feels, to be in the Olympics. Enjoy these quotes.

ENJOY! This is an experience of a lifetime and you always want to have great memories. Whatever you did prior is what counts as far as your training and preparation, so enjoy the experience and live it as if it would be the last time. — Advice to Olympic athletes from Gabby Franco, on Venezuelan shooting team at the 2000 Olympics. Read my interview with Gabby here.

As a kid, you dream of winning the Stanley Cup. As you get older, you understand the importance of winning the Olympics. — Joe Sakic, won a gold medal in men's ice hockey at the 2002 Olympics.

I wanted no part of politics. And I wasn't in Berlin to compete against any one athlete. The purpose of the Olympics, anyway, was to do your best. As I'd learned long ago from Charles Riley, the only victory that counts is the one over yourself. — Jesse Owens, won four gold medals in track and field at the 1936 Olympics.

A lifetime of training for just ten seconds. — Jesse Owens, won four gold medals in track and field at the 1936 Olympics.

My only focus was the Olympics because in my sport, that is the ultimate. Everything is geared toward that, and my entire life was geared around getting there and winning gold. - Cammi Granato, won two Olympic medals in women's ice hockey: a gold medal in 1998, and a silver medal in 2002.

The first thing is to love your sport. Never do it to please someone else. It has to be yours. — Peggy Fleming, won a gold medal in women's figure skating singles at the 1968 Olympics.

To anyone who has started out on a long campaign believing that the gold medal was destined for him, the feeling when, all of a sudden, the medal has gone somewhere else is quite indescribable. — Sebastian Coe, won four Olympic medals in track and field: a gold medal and silver medal in 1980, and a gold medal and a silver medal in 1984.

I swam my brains out. — Mark Spitz, won seven gold medals in swimming at the 1972 Olympics.

Everything about the Olympics was first class, and women were treated as athletes and equals. — Elizabeth Robinson Schwartz, first woman to win an Olympic medal in track and field: won a gold medal at the 1928 Olympics.

I always thought, it would be neat to make the Olympic team. — Michael Phelps, won six gold medals and two bronze medals in swimming at the 2004 Olympics.

I can't remember the last day I didn't train. — Michael Phelps, won six gold medals and two bronze medals in swimming at the 2004 Olympics.

The greatest memory for me of the 1984 Olympics was not the individual honors, but standing on the podium with my teammates to receive our team gold medal. — Mitch Gaylord, won a gold medal in gymmastics at the 1984 Olympics.

There can be distractions, but if you're isolated from the heart of the Games, the Olympics become just another competition. — Mary Lou Retton, won a gold medal, two silver medals, and two bronze medals in gymnastics at the 1984 Olympics.

For athletes, the Olympics are the ultimate test of their worth. — Mary Lou Retton, won a gold medal, two silver medals, and two bronze medals in gymnastics at the 1984 Olympics.

The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not winning but taking part; the essential thing in life is not conquering but fighting well. — Pierre de Coubertin, founder of the modern Olympic Games.

An Olympic medal is the greatest achievement and honor that can be received by an athlete. I would swap any World Title to have won gold at the Olympics. — Jeff Fenech, boxer for Australia at the 1984 Olympics.

It has been said that the Opening Ceremony of the Olympic Games is something that an athlete will remember for the rest of their life. It is true. That moment when you walk into the Olympic Stadium as part of the Australian Olympic Team, is a moment that I will never forget. — Jeff Fenech, boxer for Australia at the 1984 Olympics.

The Olympics have been with the world since 776 B.C., and have only been interrupted by war, especially in the modern era. — Bill Toomey, won a gold medal in decathlon at the 1968 Olympics.

The Olympics remain the most compelling search for excellence that exists in sport, and maybe in life itself. — Dawn Fraser, won eight Olympic medals in swimming: two gold medals and one silver medal in 1956; one gold medal and two silver medals in 1960; and one gold medal and one silver medal in 1964.

It is the inspiration of the Olympic Games that drives people not only to compete but to improve, and to bring lasting spiritual and moral benefits to the athlete and inspiration to those lucky enough to witness the athletic dedication. — Herb Elliott, won a gold medal in track and field at 1960 Olympics.

There is something in the Olympics, indefinable, springing from the soul, that must be preserved. — Chris Brasher, won a gold medal in steeplechase at the 1956 Olympics.

I got a bronze medal and I can't complain about that, the only African-American to get a medal in the Winter Olympics. — Debi Thomas, won a bronze medal in figure skating at the1984 Olympics.

The Olympics are a wonderful metaphor for world cooperation, the kind of international competition that's wholesome and healthy, an interplay between countries that represents the best in all of us. — John Williams, has written theme music for four Olympic games.

Citius, Altius, Fortius (faster, higher, stronger) — Olympic motto.

The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well. — Olympic creed.

In the name of all the competitors I promise that we shall take part in these Olympic Games, respecting and abiding by the rules which govern them, committing ourselves to a sport without doping and without drugs, in the true spirit of sportsmanship, for the glory of sport and the honor of our teams. — Olympic Oath for athletes.

In the name of all the judges and officials, I promise that we shall officiate in these Olympic Games with complete impartiality, respecting and abiding by the rules which govern them in the true spirit of sportsmanship — Olympic Oath for judges.

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