The PT/Berkeley Personality Test

Is your self-image in sync with other people's take on you? This exclusive test will tell you.

By K. Harary, E. Harary, published May 1, 1992 - last reviewed on June 9, 2016

Your personality is the essence of who you are and how you appear to other people. It lends continuity to your identity over time, tying together your early childhood experiences, your unique approach to the people and events around you, and your aspirations and apprehensions about how you may develop in the future. It affects, and is affected by, how other people perceive and respond to you. In short, the more you understand about your personality, the better you can understand your actions, feelings, and relationships with other people.

One of the most direct ways to find out about your personality is for a psychologist to ask you a series of carefully selected questions that have been shown in research to be related to important life outcomes, such as job satisfaction or susceptibility to depression. Self-report questionnaires are one of the most commonly used techniques in the scientific study of personality. For example, you may have heard of, or even taken, tests such as the California Psychological Inventory (CPI), the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI), or the recently revised Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2).

Each of these tests provides you with scores on several dimensions, such as extroversion and neuroticism, that together form an overall portrait, or profile, of your personality. In the hands of a qualified professional, these tests can provide very useful information about an individual's personality and psychological functioning. These tests tend to be quite long, however, and are complicated to score and interpret. Therefore, PSYCHOLOGY TODAY will present the PT/Berkeley Personality Profile -- a three-part series of tests based on cutting-edge research in the field of personality assessment. Each is designed to be scientifically valid while allowing you to take, score, and interpret the tests yourself by simply following the instructions provided.

Developed by psychologists Keith Harary, Ph.D., of the Institute for Advanced Psychology, in San Francisco, and Eileen Donahue, Ph.D., of the department of psychology and the Institute of Personality Assessment and Research at the University of California at Berkeley, the PT/Berkeley Personality Profile will help you actively explore the ways in which you perceive your behavior, as well as the ways you are perceived by those around you. By participating in this ongoing series of tests, and also by taking part in our Personality Survey (page 76) and sharing your results with us, you will be contributing to and helping advance the scientific study of personality. Your scores will be interpreted and the results will be published in subsequent issues of PSYCHOLOGY TODAY.

Part One of the test focuses on the relationship between the way you perceive your personality, the ideals you hold out for yourself, and your fears about the sort of person you could become in the future. Parts Two and Three will give you a chance to focus on the ways you express your personality in a variety of social roles, and the way your personality is perceived by the people around you. Each part provides a complete assessment of your personality from a particular intrapersonal or social perspective, and may be taken and interpreted entirely on its own. Combining the results of all three parts, however, will allow you to achieve an even broader and more penetrating examination of your personality.

In mapping the elements that come together to form our personalities, psychologists have identified five broad factors that jointly describe -- or perhaps even determine--who we are. These factors, originally called the "Big Five" by psychologist Lewis Goldberg, of the University of Oregon, each represent a particular aspect of the way in which your style of relating to the world may differ from that of others.

Your Expressive Style, for example, may range from being quiet and reserved to being enthusiastic and outgoing. Your Interpersonal Style, on the other hand, may range from being stubborn and aloof in your dealings with others to being warm, considerate, and even selfless. The third factor, Work Style, concerns the manner in which you tend to focus on tasks and meet your responsibilities. The fourth, Emotional Style, concerns your temperament and the manner in which you typically deal with stress. Finally, Intellectual Style involves the degree to which you prefer tradition and simplicity as opposed to complexity and change. Whether you are evaluating the way in which you perceive yourself or the way you believe others perceive you, these five factors allow your personality to be described comprehensively from each perspective.

In Part One of the PT/Berkeley Personality Profile, you'll use the Big Five to explore the way you see yourself from four essential perspectives. You'll then examine the similarities and differences between these points of view to achieve deeper insight into your personality as a whole. You'll begin by describing your "Inner Self," or the way you actually view the five dimensions of your personality. You'll then proceed to describe your "Outer Self," or the way in which you believe others perceive these same dimensions of your personality. Later, you'll explore two possible selves: your "Ideal Self" -- or the person you would most like to become; and your "Feared Self" -- or your worst-case scenario for the kind of person you could become should your life not take the course you desire.

Your Inner, Outer, Ideal, and Feared Selves all play central roles in influencing your sense of well-being and your behavior. Your Inner Self represents your personal values and guides your sense of how to act in any given situation. Your Outer Self helps you to develop strategies for meeting your own priorities in interactions with others. It allows you to adapt in order to navigate the real-world constraints imposed by the way you believe your actions will be interpreted by others.

In addition, by exploring the ways in which your Inner and Outer Selves relate to your possible selves -- both Feared and Ideal -- you can gain further insights into your personality. According to Hazel Markus, Ph.D., professor of psychology at the University of Michigan, thinking about our Ideal and Feared Selves helps us to establish specific, step-by-step plans to reach our long-range goals and avoid disaster. By exploring the relationship between your Actual and Ideal personality, you may begin to develop strategies to meet your goals: becoming more (or less) work-oriented, or more (or less) expressive of your emotions, etc. And by also examining the relationship between your Actual and Feared Selves, you may develop strategies to avoid becoming far removed from the person you would ultimately like to be.

Note: The 35 items in the following questionnaire were developed in research conducted at the University of California at Berkeley by Oliver P. John, Ph.D., Eileen Donahue, Ph.D., and Robert Kentle (copyright 1991, Oliver P. John; used by permission). In an effort to develop short but effective measures of the Big Five personality dimensions, the team began with large sets of trait adjectives, then developed short questionnaire items that were more detailed and easier for people to understand. Based on statistical analysis of the responses of hundreds of research participants (who were asked to rate the extent to which they felt each item accurately described their own personality), the 35 items that provided the best measures were selected and used in the PT/Berkeley Personality Profile.

A word of caution: The PT/Berkeley Personality Profile is not intended as a means of assessing the state of your mental health and does not provide any form of psychotherapy. We urge those who have a history of emotional and other psychological problems to check with qualified professionals before proceeding.

HOW TO TAKE AND SCORE THE TEST

Begin by cutting out the four vertical, multicolored scorecards along the dotted line. Place scorecards #1 and #2 alongside the 35 statements in the left-hand column. Mark your responses to the statements in the coresponding spaces on scorecard #1, rating as honestly as possible the degree to which you agree or disagree with each statement as a description of your personality. In each case, marking the number in the far left-hand column would mean that you strongly disagree with the particular statement; marking the number in the far right-hand column would mean that you strongly agree. You may, of course, mark any number in between those two poles, indicating varying degrees of agreement. Mark only one number per item on the scorecard.

Take a five-minute break and then use scorecard #2 to respond to the same 35 statements according to the way you believe others see you. Then, take another break and use scorecard #3 to respond to the statement according to the kind of personality you would ideally like to have; and after another break, to the kind of personality you fear becoming. (Fill out each scorecard without referring to any of the others.)

When you have completed all four cards, use the Scoring Guide on page 73 to analyze your results. On each of the three scoring charts, the bottom row (following the boldface type) will indicate the score needed for the Interpretation Guide as well as the 900-number hotline. (A 900-number prep box can be found on page 72.)

To interpret the meaning of your senses, simply follow the color-coded Interpretation Guide found on page 74. This guide briefly summarizes how you have described the way you see yourself in relation to your possible selves.

The PT/Berkeley Personality Profile: Possible Selves

This test lists 35 statements that can be used to describe your personality from a variety of perspectives. On each scorecard, honestly rate the extent to which you agree that each statement applies to your personality when you examine it from a given point of view.

Legend:

a = DISAGREE STRONGLY

b = DISAGREE A LITTLE

c = NEITHER AGREE NOR DISAGREE

d = AGREE A LITTLE

e = AGREE STRONGLY

(f) = Expressive Style/Orange

(g) = Interpersonal Style/Green

(h) = Work Style/Yellow

(i) = Emotional Style/Pink

(j) = Intellectual style/Blue

(k) = Biggest role rating for each item.

(Scorecards 2-5)

(l) = Smallest role rating for each item.

(Scorecards 2-5)

(m) = Subtract smallest from biggest role-rating

for each item and enter result here.

Part I

SCORECRAD #1

INNER-SELF RATING

How you see yourself

Do you agree that you

are someone who:

a b c d e

(f)1. Is outgoing, sociable 1 2 3 4 5

(g)2. Tends to find fault with others 5 4 3 2 1

(h)3. Is a reliable worker. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)4. Remains calm in tense situations. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)5. Values artistic, aesthetic

experiences 1 2 3 4 5

(f)6. Is reserved. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)7. Is considerate and kind to almost

everyone. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)8. Can be somewhat careless. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)9. Is relaxed and handles stress well. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)10. Prefers work that is routine and

simple. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)11. Is full of energy. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)12. Can be cold and aloof. 5 4 3 2 1

(h)13. Does things efficiently. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)14. Gets nervous easily. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)15. Has an active imagination. 1 2 3 4 5

(f)16. Is sometimes shy, inhibited. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)17. Likes to cooperate with others. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)18. Tends to be disorganized. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)19. Is emotionally stable, not easily

upset. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)20. Prefers the conventional,

traditional. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)21. Is talkative. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)22. Is sometimes rude to others. 5 4 3 2 1

(h)23. Does a thorough job. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)24. Is depressed, blue. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)25. Is sophisticated in art, music,

or literature. 1 2 3 4 5

(f)26. Tends to be quiet. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)27. Is generally trusting. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)28. Is lazy at times. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)29. Worries a lot. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)30. Wants things to be simple

and clear-cut. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)31. Generates a lot of enthusiasm. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)32. Has a forgiving nature. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)33. Is easily distracted. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)34. Can be tense. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)35. Is inventive. 1 2 3 4 5

Part II

SCORECARD #2

OUTER-SELF RATING

How you think

others see you

Do you agree that

others see you as

someone who:

a b c d e

(f)1. Is outgoing, sociable 1 2 3 4 5

(g)2. Tends to find fault with others 5 4 3 2 1

(h)3. Is a reliable worker. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)4. Remains calm in tense situations. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)5. Values artistic, aesthetic

experiences 1 2 3 4 5

(f)6. Is reserved. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)7. Is considerate and kind to almost

everyone. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)8. Can be somewhat careless. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)9. Is relaxed and handles stress well. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)10. Prefers work that is routine and

simple. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)11. Is full of energy. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)12. Can be cold and aloof. 5 4 3 2 1

(h)13. Does things efficiently. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)14. Gets nervous easily. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)15. Has an active imagination. 1 2 3 4 5

(f)16. Is sometimes shy, inhibited. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)17. Likes to cooperate with others. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)18. Tends to be disorganized. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)19. Is emotionally stable, not easily

upset. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)20. Prefers the conventional,

traditional. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)21. Is talkative. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)22. Is sometimes rude to others. 5 4 3 2 1

(h)23. Does a thorough job. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)24. Is depressed, blue. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)25. Is sophisticated in art, music,

or literature. 1 2 3 4 5

(f)26. Tends to be quiet. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)27. Is generally trusting. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)28. Is lazy at times. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)29. Worries a lot. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)30. Wants things to be simple

and clear-cut. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)31. Generates a lot of enthusiasm. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)32. Has a forgiving nature. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)33. Is easily distracted. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)34. Can be tense. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)35. Is inventive. 1 2 3 4 5

Part III

SCORECARD #3

IDEAL-SELF RATING

Whom you want to become?

Do you agree that you want to become someone who:

a b c d e

(f)1. Is outgoing, sociable 1 2 3 4 5

(g)2. Tends to find fault with others 5 4 3 2 1

(h)3. Is a reliable worker. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)4. Remains calm in tense situations. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)5. Values artistic, aesthetic

experiences 1 2 3 4 5

(f)6. Is reserved. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)7. Is considerate and kind to almost

everyone. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)8. Can be somewhat careless. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)9. Is relaxed and handles stress well. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)10. Prefers work that is routine and

simple. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)11. Is full of energy. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)12. Can be cold and aloof. 5 4 3 2 1

(h)13. Does things efficiently. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)14. Gets nervous easily. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)15. Has an active imagination. 1 2 3 4 5

(f)16. Is sometimes shy, inhibited. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)17. Likes to cooperate with others. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)18. Tends to be disorganized. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)19. Is emotionally stable, not easily

upset. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)20. Prefers the conventional,

traditional. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)21. Is talkative. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)22. Is sometimes rude to others. 5 4 3 2 1

(h)23. Does a thorough job. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)24. Is depressed, blue. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)25. Is sophisticated in art, music,

or literature. 1 2 3 4 5

(f)26. Tends to be quiet. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)27. Is generally trusting. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)28. Is lazy at times. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)29. Worries a lot. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)30. Wants things to be simple

and clear-cut. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)31. Generates a lot of enthusiasm. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)32. Has a forgiving nature. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)33. Is easily distracted. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)34. Can be tense. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)35. Is inventive. 1 2 3 4 5

Part IV

SCORECARD #4

FEARED-SELF RATING

Whom you fear becoming? Do you agree that you fear becoming someone who:

a b c d e

(f)1. Is outgoing, sociable 1 2 3 4 5

(g)2. Tends to find fault with others 5 4 3 2 1

(h)3. Is a reliable worker. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)4. Remains calm in tense situations. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)5. Values artistic, aesthetic

experiences 1 2 3 4 5

(f)6. Is reserved. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)7. Is considerate and kind to almost

everyone. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)8. Can be somewhat careless. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)9. Is relaxed and handles stress well. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)10. Prefers work that is routine and

simple. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)11. Is full of energy. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)12. Can be cold and aloof. 5 4 3 2 1

(h)13. Does things efficiently. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)14. Gets nervous easily. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)15. Has an active imagination. 1 2 3 4 5

(f)16. Is sometimes shy, inhibited. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)17. Likes to cooperate with others. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)18. Tends to be disorganized. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)19. Is emotionally stable, not easily

upset. 5 4 3 2 1

(j)20. Prefers the conventional,

traditional. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)21. Is talkative. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)22. Is sometimes rude to others. 5 4 3 2 1

(h)23. Does a thorough job. 1 2 3 4 5

(i)24. Is depressed, blue. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)25. Is sophisticated in art, music,

or literature. 1 2 3 4 5

(f)26. Tends to be quiet. 5 4 3 2 1

(g)27. Is generally trusting. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)28. Is lazy at times. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)29. Worries a lot. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)30. Wants things to be simple

and clear-cut. 5 4 3 2 1

(f)31. Generates a lot of enthusiasm. 1 2 3 4 5

(g)32. Has a forgiving nature. 1 2 3 4 5

(h)33. Is easily distracted. 5 4 3 2 1

(i)34. Can be tense. 1 2 3 4 5

(j)35. Is inventive. 1 2 3 4 5

ORANGE GREEN YELLOW RED BLUE

ONE

TWO I I I I I

A A A A A

THREE F F F F F

A A A A A

The PT/Berkeley Personality Profile: Scoring Guide

Beginning with the Inner-Self Rating Scorecard (#1), add together all the numbers you marked from the orange-colored lines, then enter the total in the top row of the corresponding orange space in the table below. Do the same for the green, yellow, red and blue responses, entering the scores across the top row. These are your Inner-Self scores. Next, add together and enter the color-coded numbers you marked on your Outer-Self Rating Scorecard (#2), exactly as you did for the Inner-Self Ratings, and enter the scores in the second row of the table below. These are your Outer-Self Scores. Add together the two Self-Rating Scores (Inner + Outer) for each color category and enter the total in the space provided. Then divide each total by two and enter those in the bottom box. These are your Actual-Self Image scores.

Legend:

ORANGE = Expressive Style

Add the Orange items

GREEN = Interpersonal Style

Add the Green items

YELLOW = Work Style

Add the Yellow items

RED = Emotional Style

Add the Red items

BLUE = Intellectual Style

Add the Blue items

Actual-Self

Image Scores ORANGE GREEN YELLOW RED BLUE

Inner-Self

Scores =

Outer-Self

Scores =

Add together these two self-rating scores =

Divide the above number by two. These are your Actual-Self Image Scores:

Image Scores:

To interpret your Actual-Self Image Scores, look up these five scores in the UPPER table on the next page. Match the colors shown above to those shown in the table. For each score, circle the corresponding box (that matches your score) for that color category.

Now, with the Ideal-Self Rating Scorecard (#3), add together all the numbers you marked from the orange-colored responses and enter the score in the corresponding orange space below. Do the same for the green, yellow, red, and blue responses. These are your Ideal-Self Scores. Next, compute the difference between your Actual-Self Image Scores and your Ideal-Self Scores (follow the row instructions) for each color category to determine your Ideal-Difference Scores.

Legend:

ORANGE = Expressive Style

Add the Orange items

GREEN = Interpersonal Style

Add the Green items

YELLOW = Work Style

Add the Yellow items

RED = Emotional Style

Add the Red items

BLUE = Intellectual Style

Add the Blue items

Ideal-Difference ORANGE GREEN YELLOW RED BLUE

Scores

Ideal Self

Scores =

Copy your Actual-Self Image Scores (from above) here =

For each color, subract the smaller from the larger score. In each column, Mark "I" if your ideal score was larger, and "A" if your actual score was larger. These are your Ideal-Difference Scores.

To interpret your Ideal-Difference Scores, look up these five scores in the MIDDLE table on the next page. Match the colors shown above to those shown in the table. For each score, circle the corresponding box (that matches your score) for that color category.

Now, with the Feared-Self Rating Scorecard (#4), add together all the numbers you marked from the orange-colored responses and enter the total in the corresponding orange space below. Do the same for the green , yellow, red, and blue responses. These are your Feared-Self Scores. Next compute the difference between your Actual-Self Image Scores and your Feared-Self scores (same as above) for each color category to determine your Feared-Difference Scores.

Legend:

ORANGE = Expressive Style

Add the Orange items

GREEN = Interpersonal Style

Add the Green items

YELLOW = Work Style

Add the Yellow items

RED = Emotional Style

Add the Red items

BLUE = Intellectual Style

Add the Blue items

Feared-Difference ORANGE GREEN YELLOW RED BLUE

Scores

Feared-Self

Scores =

Copy your Actual-Self Image Score (from above here) For each color, subract the smaller from the larger score. In each column, mark "F" if your Feared Score was larger, or "A" if your Actual Score was larger. These are your Feared-Difference scores.

To interpret your Feared-Difference Scores, look up these five scores in the BOTTOM table on the next page. Match the colors shown above to those shown in the table. For each score, circle the corresponding box (that matches your score) for that color category.

The PT/Berkeley Personality Profile: Interpretation Guide

Legend:

ORANGE = Expressive Style

Add the Orange items

GREEN = Interpersonal Style

Add the Green items

YELLOW = Work Style

Add the Yellow items

RED = Emotional Style

Add the Red items

BLUE = Intellectual Style

Add the Blue items

Actual-Self Image Scores

Part I

IF YOUR SCORE Expressive Style Interpersonal Style

IS BETWEEN:

7-14 VERY QUIET, RESERVED VERY ALOOF, AND

You consider OR RESTRAINED AND DIFFICULT TO GET ALONG

yourself: PERHAPS SHY OR WITH, ARE YOU BEING TOO

UNASSERTIVE. HARD ON YOURSELF?

15-21 SOMEWHAT SOCIALLY DIFFICULT OR ALOOF AT

You consider RESTRAINED BUT NOT TIMES, BUT GENERALLY

yourself: SHY OR WITHDRAWN. EASY TO GET ALONG

WITH.

22-28 OUTGOING AND/OR WARM AND CARING,

You consider ENERGETIC BUT NOT THOUGHTFUL AND

yourself: DOMINEERING OR CONSIDERATE.

HYPERACTIVE.

29-35 EXTREMELY SOCIABLE VERY GIVING OF YOURSELF.

You consider AND OUTGOING, FULL OF ALWAYS WILLING TO GO

yourself: ENERGY AND ENTHUSIASM. OUT OF YOUR WAY TO

HELP SOMEONE ELSE.

Part II

IF YOUR SCORE

IS BETWEEN: Work Style Emotional Style

7-14 SOMEWHAT IRRESPONSIBLE, ANXIOUS AND A WORRIER.

You consider PERHAPS IMPULSIVE OR YOU MAY LET STREES GET

yourself: DISTRACTIBLE. THE BETTER OF YOU.

15-21 CASUAL TOWARD WORK AND A LITTLE TENSE OR

You consider RESPONSIBILITIES, NOT EASILY UPSET, BUT NOT

yourself: OVERLY SERIOUS. ENTIRELY OVERWHELMED

BY STREE.

22-28 EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE GENERALLY CALM AND ABLE

You consider AND RELIABLE. GOOD AT TO KEEP STRESSFUL EVENTS

yourself: GETTING THINGS DONE. IN PERSPECTIVE.

29-35 PERFECTIONIST, VERY EVEN-TEMPERED AND ONE

You consider DEDICATED TO YOUR WORK WHO RARELY GETS UPSET.

yourself: AND RESPONSIBILITIES. CALM IN THE FACE OF

STRESS.

Part III

IF YOUR SCORE

IS BETWEEN: Intellectual Style

7-14 CONVENTIONAL/TRADITIONAL.

You consider NOT ESPECIALLY INTERESTED

yourself: IN PHILOSOPHY OR THE

ARTS.

15-21 MODERATE IN YOUR APPROACH

You consider TO FANCIFUL CONCEPTS AND

yourself: IDEAS

22-28 FAIRLY OPEN-MINDED AND

You consider WILLING TO CONSIDER NEW

yourself: APPROACHES AND IDEAS.

29-35 IMAGINATIVE, EAGER TO

You consider TRY OUT NEW THINGS AND

yourself: CONSIDER IDEAS FROM

MANY VIEWPOINTS.

Ideal-Difference Scores

Part I

IF YOUR SCORE

IS BETWEEN: Expressive Style Interpersonal Style

0-3 YOU ARE SATISFIED WITH YOU ARE SATISFIED WITH

I or A THE WAY YOU HANDLE THE LEVEL OF WARMTH

YOURSELF SOCIALLY. YOU SHOW TOWARD OTHERS.

4-7 I: YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE

SLIGHTLY MORE SLIGHTLY WARMER TOWARD

OUTGOING. OTHERS.

A: YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE YOU FEEL YOU ARE

SLIGHTLY MORE SLIGHTLY TOO GIVING

RESERVED. TOWARD OTHERS.

8-16 I: YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE

MORE SOCIABLE OR KINDER OR MORE

LIVELY. COMPASSIONATE.

A: YOU WOULD LIKE TO YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE

SHOW MORE RESTRAINT. MORE SELF-PROTECTIVE OR

ALOOF.

17-28 YOU MAY HAVE YOU MAY HAVE

I OR A UNREALISTIC UNREALISTIC

EXPECTATIONS ABOUT EXPECTATIONS ABOUT

THE WAY YOU SHOULD HOW CARING (OR ALOOF)

HANDLE YOURSELF IN YOU CAN OR SHOULD BE

SOCIAL SITUATIONS. TOWARD OTHERS.

Part II

IF YOUR SCORE

IS BETWEEN: Work Style Emotional Style

0-3 YOU ARE SATISFIED WITH YOU ARE SATISFIED WITH

I or A THE WAY YOU APPLY THE WAY YOU HANDLE YOUR

YOURSELF TOWARD WORK FEELINGS AND ANXIETIES.

AND RESPONSIBILITIES.

4-7 I: YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE

A LITTLE MORE A LITTLE CALMER UNDER

EFFICIENT. STRESS.

A: YOU CONSIDER YOURSELF YOU WOULD LIKE TO

A LITTLE TOO EXPRESS EMOTIONS A

WORK-ORIENTED. LITTLE MORE.

8-16 I: YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE

MORE RESPONSIBLE. MORE RELAXED OR

SELF-SECURE.

A: YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE

LESS OF A WORKAHOLIC. MORE EMOTIONAL OR

VULNERABLE.

17-28 YOU MAY HAVE YOU MAY HAVE

I OR A UNREALISTIC UNREALISTIC

EXPECTATIONS

REGARDING YOUR APPROACH TOWARD WORK/ HOW MUCH CONTROL YOU

SHOULD EXERT OVER YOUR

RESPONSIBILITIES.

Part III

IF YOUR SCORE

IS BETWEEN: Intellectual Style

0-3 YOU ARE SATISFIED WITH

I or A YOUR APPROACH TOWARD

COMPLEXITIES,

AESTHETICS AND NEW

IDEAS.

4-7 I: YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE

MORE OPEN TO NEW

IDEAS.

A: YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE

A LITTLE MORE

CONVENTIONAL.

8-16 I: YOU WOULD LIKE TO COPE

BETTER WITH

CONTRADICTION AND

INCERTAINTY.

A: YOU WOULD LIKE TO

RETURN TO A SAFER, MORE

TRADITIONAL TIME.

17-28 YOU MAY BE

I or A OVER-IDEALIZING THE

SIMPLE THINGS IN LIFE

OR SPENDING TOO MUCH

TIME WITH YOUR HEAD IN

CLOUDS.

Feared-Difference Scores

Part I

IF YOUR SCORE

IS BETWEEN: Expressive Style Interpersonal Style

0-3 YOU ARE NOT OVERLY

CONCERNED ABOUT

BECOMING MORE (OR LESS)

PHYSICALLY OR SOCIALLY WARM OR GIVING TOWARD

OTHERS.

4-7 F: YOU FEAR EXPRESSING YOURSELF TOO

TOO OPENLY OR BECOMING LENIENT OR

ACCOMODATING OF

OTHERS.

A: YOU FEAR NOT EXPRESSING YOURSELF OPENLY. YOU FEAR BECOMING

INDIFFERENT OR

SELF-ABSORBED.

8-16 F: YOU FEAR BECOMING TOO

SHOWY OR DOMINEERING. YOU FEAR GIVING TOO MUCH OF YOURSELF

TO OTHERS.

A: YOU FEAR BECOMING LESS

SOCIABLE OR ENERGETIC. YOU FEAR BECOMING SELFISH OR INSENSITIVE

TO OTHERS.

17-28 YOU HAVE STRONG FEARS

ABOUT CHANGES IN YOUR ENERGY LEVEL. YOU HAVE FEARS ABOUT MAINTAINING

AN OPTIMAL LEVEL OF

NTIMACY.

Part II

IF YOUR SCORE

IS BETWEEN: Work Style Emotional Style

0-3 YOUN ARE NOT OVERLY

CONCERNED ABOUT YOUR

APPROACH TOWARD WORK YOU DO NOT HAVE UNREALISTIC VIEWS ABOUT THE WAY YOU HANDLE YOUR

RESPONSIBILITIES AND EMOTIONS.

4-7 F: YOU FEAR BECOMING TOO

PERFECTIONIST. YOU FEAR BECOMING UNABLE TO EXPRESS YOUR

EMOTIONS.

A: YOU FEAR BEING UNABLE

TO KEEP UP WITH YOUR WORK . YOU FEAR BECOMING IRRITABLE OR

STRESSED-OUT.

8-16 F: YOU FEAR BECOMING A

WORKAHOLIC. YOU FEAR LOSING TOUCH WITH YOUR EMOTIONS.

A: YOU FEAR BECOMING TOO

SELF-INDULGENT. YOU FEAR YOU MAY LOSE CONTROL OF YOUR

EMOTIONS.

17-28 YOU MAY HAVE YOU MAY BE UNDULY

CONCERNED ABOUT

ABOUT YOUR

WORK

AND RESPONSIBILITIES.

Part III

IF YOUR SCORE

IS BETWEEN: Intellectual Style

0-3 YOU ARE NOT OVERLY

CONCERNED ABOUT YOUR

APPROACH TOWARD NEW

IDEAS AND EXPERIENCES.

4-7 F: YOU FEAR LETTING GO OF

TRADITIONAL VIEWS AND

VALUES.

A: YOU FEAR BECOMING

UNRECEPTIVE TO NEW

IDEAS.

8-16 F: YOU FEAR BEING

OVERWHELMED BY

COMPLEXITY OR CHANGE.

A: YOU FEAR BECOMING RIGID

OR SET IN YOUR WAYS.

17-28 YOU MAY BE FEELING

OVERLY CONCERNED ABOUT

YOUR APPROACH TO

AETHETICS, PHILOSOPHY,

AND POLITICAL ISSUES.