Therapy Essential Reads

Mind the Gap

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on April 30, 2015 in Think, Act, Be
We can train our minds to avoid going off track.

The Mindful Geek

The last 50 years have seen an explosion of anti-smoking campaigns as public health officials realize that smoking is a chief cause of cancer, cardiovascular illness and a host of other diseases. To some extent these campaigns have worked: We are seeing a dramatic reduction in smoking among younger generations. Good progress, but frankly it isn’t enough.

Metaphors in Therapy

By Ilana Simons Ph.D. on April 23, 2015 in The Literary Mind
A short animated video about how words change us.

Analyzing Analysts

In Shrinks, Jeffrey Lieberman reviews psychiatry's "tumultuous history," and its current emphasis on the medical treatment of mental illnesses. He maintains that psychiatry fares best when it avoids the extremes of reductionist neurobiology and the psychodynamic element in existential disease. That said, Shrinks does not address important questions about talk therapy.

Getting Existential with Josh Rouse

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 17, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Josh Rouse shares how he has been able to conquer anxiety through mindfulness.

Outgrowing Jealousy

Obsessive thinking is inevitably inaccurate.

Redditor to Redditor

Young men are finding new ways to reach out to each other and older generations for advice and mentorship.

Forgetting PTSD: How Genes Affect Memory

The tet1 gene plays a central role in forgetting traumatic experiences.

A Strength-Based Approach Helps Children

The positive psychology movement has started to ask "what is healthy," "what is working," and "what are a child’s strengths" as central—and often more important—than what is wrong or what disorder or illness does a child have... and this can change lives.

Looking in the Cultural Mirror at 100, the Top 10

Five years ago, I began writing pieces for Looking in the Cultural Mirror. While psychology may define itself as the science of behavior, when it comes to people it often seems more like the science of American behavior than of human behavior everywhere. This, my 100th piece, discusses the blog’s background and aims. It offers links to the most popular 10.

Should We Blame Depression for the Germanwings Crash?

By David B. Feldman Ph.D. on April 06, 2015 in Supersurvivors
In the aftermath of the Germanwings Flight 9525 tragedy, the media quickly pointed to the co-pilot's "severe depression" as a possible cause of the crash. Was this really the cause? Or does this tell us more about our society's continued stigmatization of mental illness than of what really happened?

7 Scientifically Proven Benefits of Gratitude

Take a few minutes each day to acknowledge all that you have to be thankful for. Showing just a little bit of gratitude can transform your life in incredible ways.

Cooperation Is Natural

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on March 31, 2015 in The Green Mind
Nature contact facilitates mental and physical development, improves learning, makes us more cooperative, and promotes pro-environmental choices. These are the qualities we need for a prosperous society and that negotiators in tough negotiations need for positive results.

After the Germanwings Crash, 7 Lessons About Mental Illness

By Carrie Barron M.D. on March 30, 2015 in The Creativity Cure
Not all depressions are alike. Severe depression with psychotic features may elude a clinician as they are well masked or not present at the time of the exam. Symptoms ebb and flow, troubled people can be high functioning and we have much to uncover about the conditions of the Germanwings co-pilot.

Precision Medicine’s Cultural Limits

"Everyone is different." This is the fundamental tenant of Precision Medicine: to utilize this difference to improve outcome. Real life is more complicated, and there is a lot that is not yet worked out before this approach will yield benefits.

Obama and Netanyahu in Family Therapy

After the initial evaluation and assessment, the therapist identified three classic family dysfunctions that exist in the relationship between Barack and Bibi: enmeshment, triangulation, and emotional cut-offs.

Book Review: Wisdom from the Couch

By Ryan Howes PhD, ABPP on March 22, 2015 in In Therapy
Dr. Jennifer Kunst shares the warmer, friendlier side of Kleinian psychology in this interview and book review.

Children Who Kill Are Often Victims Too

Children who murder have often been severely abused or neglected and have experienced a tumultuous home life

The Therapy Relationship in Psychodynamic Therapy versus CBT

Some therapists have no idea what a therapeutic relationship means

Spirituality and Addiction

For years, people have accepted the notion that addiction is a spiritual disorder. Let's take a look at that idea.

No, There Is no Such Thing as ADHD

Understanding the interplay of temperament and trauma reveals the fiction of ADHD.

The Borderline Father

Women are more likely to have Borderline Personality Disorder, but men can be impacted as well. Here's how a Borderline father can affect you and some tips about what you can do about it.

Creativity and Mental Illness

Creating and creativity are healthy processes in contradiction to contentions such as those of Kay Jamison and Nancy Andreasen and others who have carried out weak research purportedly showing connections between creativity and mental illness.

Psychosis Sucks!

By Joe Pierre M.D. on March 05, 2015 in Psych Unseen
Does the British Psychological Society's recently published monograph called "Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia" dangerously romanticize mental illness? Here's why psychiatrists say yes.

The Scientific Case for Owning Up to Your Porn Use

Many people believe that porn use should be hidden from a relationship partner. However, a new study suggests that when women think their partners are honest about their porn use, they tend to be happier with their relationships.

Theo Fleury Is Teaching Us How to Heal

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Former professional hockey player Theo Fleury is no stranger to confrontation, both on and off the ice. In 2009, he bravely and publicly confronted a very personal issue—sexual abuse and alcoholism. He explains how communication is pertinent to well-being, and even though the road ahead may not be easy, he truly believes that people can learn to heal.

Empathy for a Child Abuser?

Empathy for a child abuser? For a child molester? How can anyone be empathic with someone who has done something so terrible? Why would they want to? Do the perpetrators possibly deserve such a thing? For a judge or prosecutor, of course not. For stopping repetitive dysfunctional family interactions that trigger someone's self-destructive behavior? Necessary.

How to Feel Better When You’re Feeling Bad

When you feel down, discouraged or frustrated, Buddhist concepts and techniques that focus you in the immediate present can offer surprising relief. Here's some starter key ideas, and info on an accessible and engaging guide that can help you to learn more.

Having a Baby: When You Don't Agree

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on February 26, 2015 in Fixing Families
Being on different pages about having children can be a major relationship roadblock. The key is uncovering the problem under the problem -- some likely suspects.

Malignant Narcissism and the Murder of a Parent

By Carrie Barron M.D. on February 24, 2015 in The Creativity Cure
This blog explores Malignant Narcissism and the damaging impact that it can have on family members and others.