Therapy Essential Reads

Theo Fleury Is Teaching Us How to Heal

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Former professional hockey player Theo Fleury is no stranger to confrontation, both on and off the ice. In 2009, he bravely and publicly confronted a very personal issue—sexual abuse and alcoholism. He explains how communication is pertinent to well-being, and even though the road ahead may not be easy, he truly believes that people can learn to heal.

Empathy for a Child Abuser?

Empathy for a child abuser? For a child molester? How can anyone be empathic with someone who has done something so terrible? Why would they want to? Do the perpetrators possibly deserve such a thing? For a judge or prosecutor, of course not. For stopping repetitive dysfunctional family interactions that trigger someone's self-destructive behavior? Necessary.

How to Feel Better When You’re Feeling Bad

When you feel down, discouraged or frustrated, Buddhist concepts and techniques can offer surprising relief. Here's some starter key ideas, and info on an accessible and engaging guide that can help you to learn more.

Having a Baby: When You Don't Agree

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on February 26, 2015 in Fixing Families
Being on different pages about having children can be a major relationship roadblock. The key is uncovering the problem under the problem -- some likely suspects.

Malignant Narcissism and the Murder of a Parent

By Carrie Barron M.D. on February 24, 2015 in The Creativity Cure
This blog explores Malignant Narcissism and the damaging impact that it can have on family members and others.

9 Thoughts That Destroy Loving Relationships

Don't let any of these toxic thoughts overtake you and hurt or destroy your loving relationship.

8 Negative Attitudes of Chronically Unhappy People

All of us experience negative thoughts from time to time. How we manage our negative attitudes can make the difference between confidence versus fear, hope versus despair, mastery versus victimhood, and victory versus defeat. Here are eight negative attitudes of chronically unhappy people...

Mindfulness for Chronic Pain

By Michael Hogan Ph.D on February 20, 2015 in In One Lifespan
There is a strong emerging body of evidence for the effectiveness of mindfulness- and acceptance-based approaches for a range of difficulties, including chronic pain. We tried to take mindfulness for chonic pain online. We called our programme Mindfulness in Action (MIA). The results of our MIA trial were interesting.

10 Barriers to Intimacy and How You Can Break Them Down

By Peg Streep on February 18, 2015 in Tech Support
How close and connected you feel to your partner changes over time and can, alas, both ebb and flow. What you can do to increase intimacy in your relationship, based on science.

Moving Toward Compassion in the Psychological Sciences

By Steven C. Hayes Ph.D. on February 17, 2015 in Get Out of Your Mind
We practice a kind of hypocrisy in the behavioral health area that’s not only embarrassing but counterproductive.

Personality Disorders Explained: What They Are

By Michael Karson Ph.D., J.D. on February 17, 2015 in Feeling Our Way
A person with a personality disorder can be asymptomatic, but we should still use the label if dysfunction or distress would follow from a reasonably expectable change in the environment.

How to Stop Calling Yourself a Fraud or a Failure

By Marcia Reynolds Psy.D. on February 14, 2015 in Wander Woman
Whether you are starting something new or you made some mistakes you regret, you might fall into the trap of calling yourself a failure. Or you worry others will judge you as incompetent. This post will help you recognize scenarios where you discount yourself and then it gives you 5 steps for helping you recover your confidence so you can move on.

10 Ways to Tell if You're Giving Your Relationship a Chance

We all hold beliefs about love and the importance it have for our happiness. This 10-item scale will tell you how realistic or unrealistic you are about what to expect from your closest romantic partners, how responsible you are for other people's happiness, and whether you're driven by the need for approval.

Thirst Responders

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on February 13, 2015 in In Excess
Most people have probably heard of ‘binge drinking’ and ‘binge eating’. But what about binge gambling? Binge gambling shares many similarities with other binge behaviours including loss of control, salience, mood modification, conflict, withdrawal symptoms, denial, etc. This blog looks at an interesting case study of binge gambling

Are Your Boundaries Making You Miserable?

By Leon F Seltzer Ph.D. on February 12, 2015 in Evolution of the Self
Sure, you need boundaries. And undeniably, you have the right to assert them—whether to safeguard your privacy, self-respect, or basic sense of decency. So it’s crucial to develop the ability and self-confidence to say no, or to tell others to stop doing what they’re doing. But what also needs to be emphasized is that some of your boundaries may be holding you hostage. . .

Psychological Strength Research That Everybody Needs to Know

By Todd B Kashdan Ph.D. on February 11, 2015 in Curious?
New research puts two psychological treatments of depression to the test. Should we choose a treatment that capitalizes on people's strengths or one that compensates for their deficits and weaknesses? Both make sense. The beauty of science is that we can compare these approaches. Find out the results.

Study: This May Be the Best Way to Keep Couples Together

By Gwendolyn Seidman Ph.D. on February 09, 2015 in Close Encounters
New research found that an intervention in which couples watched and discussed 5 romantically-themed movies together put them at significantly lower risk of divorce, on par with the effectiveness of well-known therapeutic interventions.

The Silver Lining Around Fearful Living

By Liane Gabora Ph.D. on February 07, 2015 in Mindbloggling
One good thing about fear, other than it stops you from doing stupid, dangerous stuff, is that can hold you back from learning the facts inside out, which may help keep that creatively inspiring sense of wonder and possibility alive.

Forget Co-Parenting with a Narcissist, and Do This Instead

By Linda Esposito LCSW on February 06, 2015 in From Anxiety to Zen
While co-parenting with a narcissist is nearly impossible, these strategies can help you and your child(ren) thrive when drama and emotional intensity threaten to derail your mental health.

What Is Mindfulness and How Does It Work?

By Gregg Henriques on February 06, 2015 in Theory of Knowledge
Mindfulness is one of the most important developments in mental health in the past twenty years. Understand what it is and how it works.

How to Use All 5 Senses to Beat Stress

By Vinita Mehta Ph.D., Ed.M. on February 04, 2015 in Head Games
With the hassles of everyday life, it's easy for a bad day to take a downward spiral. Studies show that you can feel better by engaging the five senses. Here are five research-backed ways to de-stress and connect more deeply to your senses.

Treating Parents Helps Kids

By David Rettew M.D. on February 04, 2015 in ABCs of Child Psychiatry
There is mounting evidence that mental health problems can run in families and that treating parents can improve child behavior. Putting this knowledge into practice, however, has been slow.

Out of Sight, Out of Mind

By Liza Long on February 02, 2015 in The Accidental Advocate
If we bring back the asylums, how do we make sure that our loved ones with mental illness remain part of our lives?

Why Does Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Work?

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on January 29, 2015 in Think, Act, Be
The principles behind CBT aren’t new, so why is it so effective?

Are Your Smart Devices Causing You a Pain In the Neck?

By Steve Sisgold on January 27, 2015 in Life in a Body
The more cell phones, electronic tablets, virtual games and computers that we use, the more we build stress in our bodies.

Healing the Shame of Childhood Abuse Through Self-Compassion

Shame can be the most damaging effect of child abuse--compassion is its anecdote.

Are Bilinguals Really Smarter?

Conventional wisdom says that individuals who speak more than one language are more adept cognitively than individuals who speak just one language. A new study, however, challenges the notion that bilingualism enhances cognitive control, despite a large number of studies showing just such an advantage. The alleged culprit? Publication bias.

There Is Nothing Either Good or Bad But Thinking Makes It So

Lack of empathy is the black hole in our social relations.

Money Decisions

By Marty Babits on January 07, 2015 in The Middle Ground
How are you handling your money? Do you find that planning and discussing money issues are problematic? This article can help.

Smiling Again with Laughing Gas

By Mark Borigini M.D. on January 05, 2015 in Overcoming Pain
And so, maybe it is time to look at what we already have: Although ketamine has gained interest in recent years as a rapidly acting potential therapy for treatment refractory depression, researchers say an even better option may lie in another well-known agent with a similar mechanism of action ― nitrous oxide, better known as laughing gas. (Image from Google.)