Essential Reads

The Worst Thing That Can Happen When You Panic

It's not as bad as you think.

Is Group Therapy an Antidote for Antidepressants?

Group Treatment Is Good Medicine For Depression

Sibling Incest in the News

Treatment options for sibling incest.

Tackling the Emotions in Borderline Personality Disorder

The newest therapy for one of psychology's most challenging disorders

Recent Posts on Therapy

Why We Use Drugs: The Power of Addictive Tendencies

Addictions are a hotel; they are not home but can remind people of home so powerfully that they won’t easily abandon them without knowing where their real home is and how to get there.

Are You Having a Relationship with an Adult Coloring Book?

As of this writing, five of the top 30 titles on Amazon’s best-seller list are adult coloring books. With over 2000 titles out there and rising, the phenomenon of adult coloring-within-the-lines just seems to have no end in sight. Just why have adult coloring books become such a phenomenon?

Harnessing the Freedom to Choose Success

Arms folded in front of her, Jana tried to remain calm in the face of a challenge from her parents and me. Joan and Ron, successful professionals who had grown up in the drug scene of the 1970s, were stuck. They agreed that her diagnosis of abuse of alcohol ought not to be ignored, but did not want to “crimp her style” or lead her into a rebellion which might lead her to

Motivation in Education, Therapy, and Parenting

Vengeful parental fantasies often take the form of protecting the child from invented or exaggerated external threats.

The Deep Dark Hole of Depression

Depression is scary to some and familiar to others. But everyone knows how easy it can be to fall into the depression hole. What we all need to realize though is that regardless of whether we fall in the trap or not, we don't have to live there. We don't have to make a home there. This article distinguishes between living in depression and acknowledging that it's there.

Venting Your Feelings Isn't Enough

Research suggests that venting might make you angrier, but a process called pendulation might actually decrease angry feelings.

Finding Your Power Through Writing

The practice of writing, journaling in particular, can be a powerful tool to help you understand your passions and life purpose. Writing is a way to tap into your subconscious mind and learn about your true self. The transcendent feelings that comes in knowing this can be awe-inspiring and life-changing. The article also includes journaling prompts.

Digging Deeper Into Recovery

The Resilience Regiment speaks with Kevin Granich at Morningside Recovery.

Paraphilia: Insects as Sources of Sexual Arousal

For many people, insects evoke a sense of fear or disgust—not lust. So how and why do some people use these creatures with sexual excitement? The answer lies in the ways in which our bodies respond to lions, cockroaches and foreplay, along with the capacity of the human mind to interpret physiological states in rather remarkable and creative ways.

Ten Powerful Psychology Tools to Calm Your Anxious Mind

Are you stuck in overthinking? Anxious thoughts and worries can overwhelm you and make it even more difficult to make decisions and take action to deal with whatever problem is bothering you. Learn tools from Mindfulness and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy to take back control of your life.

Secrets of Psychotherapy: Ten Ways to Help You Be Happy (#3)

By Stephen A Diamond Ph.D. on June 28, 2015 in Evil Deeds
What can different types of psychotherapy tell us about living a happier life?

6 Signs You Might Want to Call a Therapist

Depressive thinking can inhibit help-seeking behaviors.

A Treatment for Despair and Loss of Meaning

A famous Talmudic question asks: “What is truer than the truth?” The answer: “The story.” This is the story of my personal journey in search of meaning and the development of an approach to care for patients with advanced cancer, which I came to call “Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy.”

The Worst Thing That Can Happen When You Panic

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on June 25, 2015 in Think, Act, Be
The catastrophes we fear aren't real.

Understanding and Working With Flashbacks, Part One

Since June is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Awareness month, it seems relevant to focus on the common but debilitating symptom of flashbacks that so often accompanies a PTSD diagnosis.

Social Media in a Successful Psychotherapy Practice

By Kristi Pikiewicz PhD on June 24, 2015 in Meaningful You
Learning how to navigate the new terrain of social media in a professional manner is integral to the success of a psychotherapy practice.

23 Mental Health Professionals Interviewed About Their Jobs

By Brad Waters on June 24, 2015 in Design Your Path
Going behind the scenes with 23 mental health professionals to gain insight into the pros and cons of the industry.

Trends in Youth Psychiatric Treatment: The Plot Thickens

A major new study looks at changes in the rates of child psychiatric disorders and their treatment. Its combination of both good and bad news will be a challenge to the cherry pickers on both sides of the psychiatry debate.

Therapy That Makes Life Worth Living

There is no magic pill for mental health, nor a quick fix for years of ingrained thoughts and behaviors.

"Inside Out": Emotional Truths by Way of Pixar

Pixar's "Inside Out" proves to be impressivley accurate to cognitive, developmental, and clinical psychology. Five of the six scientifically validated universal emotions demonstrate what it might be like in the mind of an 11-year-old girl who struggles with having to move away from her friends and to a different city. The film sends a message and has therapeutic value.

The Data Doctor on Researcher-Practice Communication

A researcher asks the Data Doctor about the best ways to make share her work with practitioners, who live in a rather different universe despite some overlapping training in graduate school. Poor communication between researchers and practitioners is one of the biggest problems in the field today (and, I think, mostly the fault of researchers).

Data Doctor: How to Discuss Charleston Shooting With Clients

A counselor seeks resources and guidance for discussing the Charleston shooting in a support group and the Data Doctor makes a plea to the media to stop reinforcing shooters with publicity for themselves and their disturbed ideas. The Data Doctor column addresses questions about research, practice, and policy related to violence, adversity, and resilience.

What Do Dreams Mean?

Dreams have fascinated people from the beginning of time. People believe dreams foretell the future; that they have psychological meanings; we commune with sprits and the dead; that there are visitations from ancestors; dreams are filled with omens and auguries. They are steeped in mystery, as if written in some kind of secret code, decipherable to a special few.

Creative Rehabilitation, Part 2: Severe Head Injury

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on June 21, 2015 in Trouble in Mind
Severe head injury is a family's worse nightmare. Are there ways to make the recovery process less stressful and even fun?

Lavender, Roses, and Oh So Much More

Health benefits of gardening indicate that it is worth the effort as an investment, not only for the beauty, but for augmented mental and physical health.

Sibling Incest in the News

Having worked in the child sexual abuse field for 30 some years, I am continually struck with a sense of sadness when yet another family comes forward with admissions of sibling sexual abuse. Rather than judgment it is important to be aware of treatment and healing options. Jumping to quick labeling without understanding the help needed is dangerous.

The Need for Safety in Therapy, Part Three

“Internal” safety relates to the client’s “felt sense” and subjective inner processes that serve as an emotional barometer for them throughout the process.

Therapy Through...Choir?

Exploring choirs that are specifically designed to strengthen the speech skills of those with speech deficits.

Tackling the Emotions in Borderline Personality Disorder

People with borderline personality disorder have one of the most challenging psychological problems to treat. Furthermore, if you or someone you know is in a relationship with someone who has this disorder, you know how difficult it can be to live with the disorder. Mentalization-based therapy, focused on emotions, may provide an important new approach.