Essential Reads

Here is a Powerful Acronym to Help Your Child Manage Stress!

Giving your child essential skills to succeed in life.

How Gratitude Can Help Your Career

Your path to improvement is hidden in your pleasure, not your discontent.

Let It Go! Your Stuff, That Is

The under-appreciated psychological benefits of de-cluttering your space.

Time Management 101

Helping College Students Manage Their Time More Effectively

Recent Posts on Stress

Sometimes We Can't Put a Positive Spin on Our Troubles

By Allison Carmen on October 09, 2015 The Gift of Maybe
Sometimes it is hard to see the positive side of life when you feel disappointed or an unexpected event leaves you feeling alone and groundless. You want to feel optimistic but you just don’t see how life will change or what could possibly make things better. This is a perfect moment to let Maybe into your life.

Feeling Exhausted and Overwhelmed?

Feeling exhausted and run-down? The answer may be closer than you think.

Quash Your Bad Habits by Knowing What Triggers Them

By Peter Bregman on October 08, 2015 How We Work
“One minute I was fine,” Jeff later told me at dinner, “And the next I was yelling.” He paused, thoughtfully, shaking his head, “I did not see that coming.”

Why You Can't 'Just Say No' to Stress

With mental health awareness month upon us, there's lots of information circulating that can either help or hinder our understanding of our emotions and reactions to stress. We need to weed through the messages to ensure we don't assume it's only a matter of will power, but something requiring all hands on deck across our social institutions to avoid becoming fried.

Journalists Can Be Nearly as Prone to PTSD as Combat Vets

By Eric Newhouse on October 06, 2015 Invisible Wounds
Recent studies show that war correspondents and photojournalists covering combat may have five times the normal rate of PTSD. Some national and international news organizations are now offering counseling to employees who are having trouble processing what they've seen on the job.

A Flood of Trouble: Handling Natural Disaters

Self-care is imperative during and after a natural disaster like the flooding of the East Coast this week. Join us as Mandy helps husband Jim after his stroke.

Are You Being Treated Fairly at Work?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on October 05, 2015 Media Spotlight
Studies looking at emotional burnout, absenteeism, and health problems linked to workplace stress are increasingly finding a strong link between these kind of issues and perceived injustice in the workplace. A new study suggests that employees dealing with perceived injustice become more vulnerable to stress-related health problems due to frustration and fatigue.

Here is a Powerful Acronym to Help Your Child Manage Stress!

Kids do better in life when they learn how to calm down and solve problems! Borrowing from Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) the word "ACCEPTS" provides prompts for valuable coping skills for children, teens, and adults to handle stress. To help your child or teen better deal with stress, take a look at the power of the 7 skills embodied in "ACCEPTS"

An Overwhelmed Graduate Student

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on October 04, 2015 How To Do Life
A transcript of a part of my session with a client. Many lessons embedded.

How Gratitude Builds (and Busts) Relationships

It was the email equivalent of the middle finger. I recently referred a friend of mine to a business coach colleague of mine, and days later I received a thank you, not from him, but from his assistant. Part of the reason why this encounter rubbed me the wrong way is because I am a gratitude junkie.

How Gratitude Can Help Your Career

By Peter Bregman on October 01, 2015 How We Work
I was opening the mail (the real mail, the one delivered by an actual, live person) and between the bills and solicitations, was a single letter, addressed to me, in sloppy — but recognizable — handwriting. Recognizable because the handwriting was mine.

Let It Go! Your Stuff, That Is

By Sherry Hamby Ph.D. on September 30, 2015 The Web of Violence
The benefits of improving your immediate physical environment are under-appreciated.

Creating Deep Connections in an Anti-Depth World

By Carrie Barron M.D. on September 30, 2015 The Creativity Cure
Research indicates that people are craving substantive experience. An "anti-depth" culture may feel easier, lighter or happier, at first but with a surfeit of superficial engagements, people suffer. Depression, stress and anxiety are rising and if we can alter our relationship to devices and to one another, we might feel much better.

How Are Human Traits Linked to Specific Brain Connections?

By Christopher Bergland on September 30, 2015 The Athlete's Way
Researchers at Oxford University have identified that positive and negative human traits are linked to specific brain connections.

Is Your Diet SAD?

By Peter Bongiorno ND, LAc on September 29, 2015 Inner Source
Do you think your getting all the nutrients you need? You eat right, right? Mmmm… maybe not. See what the research is saying, and check these 7 steps to make sure you covering the bases.

Bilateral Drawing: Self-Regulation for Trauma Reparation

Current trauma research indicates that bilateral stimulation in the form of eye movement desensitization (EMDR) and similar methods are effective for many individuals. But is there a more creative way to engage cross-hemisphere activity for reparation and recovery?

How Mindfulness Improves Your Brain and Relationships

Mindfulness is the process of paying attention, in an open, nonjudgmental way, to your experience. Recent statistical review which pooled data from 16 studies shows that mindfulness has effects on at least 8 different brain regions involved in brain integration and connectivity, sense of self, impulse control, stress and anxiety, and regulation of attention and emotion.

How Autumn Leaves Color Our Inner Lives

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on September 29, 2015 Minding the Body
We love the brilliant hues of fall foliage — but why? Two experts reflect on the sensory appeal and emotional allure of autumn leaves.

Time Management 101

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on September 29, 2015 Head of the Class
College students, especially those in their first year, often struggle with time management. How can they learn to use their time wisely while still reserving some for recreation and socializing? Documenting where and how they spend (and often lose) their time is a good first step.

One Easy Question Can Help Break the Anxiety Cycle

By Christopher Bergland on September 29, 2015 The Athlete's Way
Researchers have identified that asking yourself one easy question can help break the anxiety cycle.

Acupuncture for Stress and Depression? Yes, Please!

Are you looking for an alternative (or addition) to medication for depression and anxiety? Acupuncture just may be your answer.

Anxiety Can Speed Aging

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on September 27, 2015 Memory Medic
No one gets to re-live the past, but everyone can influence their own future.

Too Much Homework from a Student/Teacher Perspective

In a given school year, many students spend hours upon hours each night working on school assignments. Add to that work, sports, and extracurricular activities and it’s no wonder we have a lot of stressed out teens.

Foundation Helps Vets "Dress for Success" in Job Interviews

By Eric Newhouse on September 26, 2015 Invisible Wounds
Kewon Potts, a Navy veteran, was one of 25-plus vets being given new suits, dress shirts and ties this month to wear to job interviews. The Save-a-Suit foundation and its founder, Scott Sokolowski, believe it's important to dress for success because it improves the interviewer's critical first impression and builds the vets' confidence.

Test Stress in Children: Rx with Brain Friendly Studying

By Judy Willis M.D., M.Ed. on September 25, 2015 Radical Teaching
Tests are often one of the most stressful experiences facing children. Because we can’t make them go away like bad dreams, we can help reduce that stress by guiding kids to study using brain-research based strategies that increase memory and understanding.

Is Everything You Know About Stress Wrong?

Stress is an inevitable part of life. How you handle is it what counts.

The New Science of Stress: What You Need to Know

Did you drive to the office this morning wondering whether your work stress could kill you? Me neither, but I recently spent time talking to different radio outlets around the country about stress. Not exactly a light topic for the morning drive, yet I’m guessing that many of you experience some level of stress from your job.

Optimism and Anxiety Change the Structure of Your Brain

By Christopher Bergland on September 23, 2015 The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have identified that adults who have a larger orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) tend to be more optimistic and less anxious.

What Do Hypoactive Sexual Desire and PTSD Have in Common?

By Jeffrey Lieberman M.D. on September 22, 2015 Shrink Speak
Science and social pressures influence how and when drugs are developed by the pharmaceutical industry.

Coping With Technological Overload

Is your job placing too many technological demands on you? Technology overload is often mentioned as one important area of stress, especially for older workers.