Essential Reads

Fear and Anxiety Affect the Health and Life Span of Dogs

Increased stress can shorten the lifespans of both humans and dogs

5 Tips for Coping with a Really Bad Day

What to do when everything is going wrong.

7 Ways Mentally Strong People Combat Stress

How to turn stressful circumstances into opportunities to grow stronger.

Baby Crying? Don't Shame the Parents!

What all adults need to know about letting babies "cry it out"

Recent Posts on Stress

How to Stop Choking Under Pressure

By Jonathan Fader Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in The New You
Every athlete in the world, at one time or another, has choked under pressure. Sometimes, athletes are able to bounce back. Other times, a botched play can haunt an athlete for the rest of his or her career.

Fear and Anxiety Affect the Health and Life Span of Dogs

Research shows that increased levels of certain types of fearfulness in dogs may be associated higher susceptibility to skin diseases and to reduced life span.

How Do You Handle Your Insecurities?

It’s natural to feel insecure from time to time, but these feelings can get in the way of your happiness. Figuring out where those insecurities come from is the first step to overcoming them.

Are You Fully Charged? 5 Ways to Energize Your Work & Life

A survey of 10,000 people revealed that only 11% responded "yes" when asked, "Did you have a great deal of energy yesterday?"

Developing Time Management Skills

When life gets busy, things pile up. Time management is not about having all of those things done; it’s about having enough time for what matters most to you. By managing your time in a more efficient way, not only will you the right things done, but you’ll also have enough time to relax, de-stress and breathe more freely.

5 Tips for Coping with a Really Bad Day

By Alice Boyes Ph.D. on July 27, 2015 in In Practice
What to do when everything is going wrong.

7 Ways Mentally Strong People Combat Stress

While stress causes some people to crumble, mentally strong people continue to thrive in the midst of added tension.

Baby Crying? Don't Shame the Parents!

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on July 26, 2015 in Moral Landscapes
A medical doctor, also a parent, wrote to me recently to complain about my blog post, "'Dangers of Crying it Out.'" Here is (most of) my response.

The Archeology of Misbehavior

Archeology is the study of human activity in the past. The archeology of misbehavior is studying current behavior to uncover hidden sources. The “ruins” of misdeeds are built upon personality architecture and cultural landscapes.

5 Tips for a More Relaxing Urban Walk

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on July 25, 2015 in Minding the Body
A walk down city streets is generally less calming than a nature hike. But these tips can make an urban walk more relaxing and refreshing.

It’s Time For Our Culture Of Overwork To Be Over

By Tim Leberecht on July 24, 2015 in The Romance of Work
We may talk a good game about how we want to achieve the ever-elusive work/life balance—but what do we do about it? How many of us approach it with the kind of profound urgency that marks the conundrums we attempt to solve at work? I had the chance recently to sit down with Brigid Schulte, author of "Overwhelmed: How to Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time."

Do You Want More Respect and Recognition for Your Work?

By Allison Carmen on July 23, 2015 in The Gift of Maybe
The desire for appreciation and respect from others often stems from a fear that things are not all right. We are afraid that we're not who we should be or we're not accomplishing enough with our lives. Yet the trap is that we can’t always get from others what we are looking for and must look within in order to find any semblance of stability and freedom.

Feeling Insecure vs. Empathy

How can we learn to live with our insecurities

Failing to Protect Sandra Bland

Many legal issues surrounding Ms. Sandra Bland’s arrest and death entail further investigations, including whether existed the illegal arrest and abuse of authority by the officer who stopped her for an alleged traffic violation and whether her death at a jail cell in Waller County, Texas was suicide or murder. One thing is certain that the jail authority violated the law.

Managing Pregnancy Jealousy During Infertility

Feeling jealous of another woman’s pregnancy is common and normal when you are experiencing infertility. Instead of feeling guilty, try these 6 ways to give yourself a break.

What Your Financial Health Says About Your Mental Health

Studies show the likelihood of having a mental health problem is three times higher among people who have debt.

How To Become More Resilient

Resiliency is the way in which someone copes with life's adversities. You might assume that some people are simply more resilient than others. The fact is that resiliency may be more of a lifestyle choice than anything else. While some might be innately more resilient than others, resiliency can be a learned behavior resulting in a healthier outlook on life.

Childhood Poverty Has Detrimental Impacts on Brain Structure

Evidence continues to mount that there is a link between growing up in a low-income household, brain development, and lower academic achievement. The majority of children attending public schools in the United States come from low-income households. We have a crisis on our hands. In this blog post, I summarize the findings of a wide range of recent studies on this topic.

Fears: Staring Straight into the Dark of What Scares You

People have talked sense to me. When you’re frightened everybody tells you things that make perfect sense. That’s when you realize it isn’t sense you’re looking for.

Small Stressors

Irregardless and Momentarily are annoying

Can't Vacation? Here's the Science of How to Recharge Fast

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on July 20, 2015 in Feeling It
Minibreaks are undervalued but research says they're golden.

The Path of Optimal Living

Identifying the nine areas that contribute to health and happiness and The Path for their development

Reviewing the Evidence for Mental Illness Being Epigenetic

The basic claim of the imprinted brain theory that gene expression is critical in neuro-development is vindicated by a new review of the data.

How Troubled Kids are like Tornadoes

A book about tornado science mirrors concerns with juveniles for whom pressure can explode into utter destruction.

Can Using Xanax When Flying Cause PTSD?

“We barely made it. After we landed, they closed the airport. Thank God I had my Xanax to get me through it.” Though life-threatening events happen rarely in aviation, they happen routinely in the Xanax-fueled mind of an anxious flier. Threats to one's life, whether real or imagination-based, can lead to PTSD.

Negotiating Your True Worth

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on July 16, 2015 in Obesely Speaking
Understanding what you are versus who you are in a world that understands neither.

How Can We Face a Difficult Time With a New Perspective?

By Allison Carmen on July 16, 2015 in The Gift of Maybe
Many of us lose perspective in the situations we are dealing with in our lives, no matter what they are. A particular situation becomes all-consuming and we start to believe that we need it to work out a particular way for our lives to be okay. How can we create some separation from our problems to gain a new perspective and relieve some of our stress and worry?

No-Face Day in the Cheery Workplace

Modern workplaces expect workers to be happy, and are developing ever-more sophisticated tools for making sure that employees are positive, engaged, and productive. But one Chinese company's "No-Face Day," in which employees were allowed to wear masks that excused them from the demand to be happy, suggests just how exhausting-- and unnecessary-- this can be.

Lower Your Stress

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on July 16, 2015 in Your Wise Brain
Every so often, stop all that doing for a bit. Perhaps the In Box is empty, the baby's asleep, and the bills are in the mail. The urgency of the daily round falls away and a quiet fills the air. Thoughts slow down, no longer grabbed and jostled by tasks. There is presence in this moment, and no worries about the future.

The Adaptive Functions of Music Listening

By Michael Hogan Ph.D on July 16, 2015 in In One Lifespan
Music is one of the most profound of all human creations. Music can transform our ongoing psychological state in an instant, and can also enhance psychological functioning across the lifespan. However, less is known about the full range of adaptive functions of music listening and how these adaptive functions promote well-being and enhance quality of life.