Essential Reads

Do Dogs Have Empathy for Human Stress and Discomfort?

Both dogs and people produce stress hormones when they hear a baby cry.

Telepressure: The Dark Side of Convenience

The benefits of technology may come with a price for employees.

Does Emotional Attachment to an Owner Change in Older Dogs?

Research shows that older dogs appear to be less emotionally secure.

10 Tips to Change From Reactive to Proactive in Situations

10 Ways to Be Less Reactive in Difficult Situations

Recent Posts on Stress

How Can We Nurture Our Teens?

What needs to be in place within communities to show teens that they’re not miniature adults, but valued for their stage in life?

Do Dogs Have Empathy for Human Stress and Discomfort?

Dogs and humans seem to respond in the same way when they hear the crying sounds of the distressed baby.

8 Ways to Achieve More by Working Less

Strategic slacking has enabled me to dramatically increase both the quality of my work and the amount I get done in a given day. It increases productivity because we don't think or work or create at the same rate throughout the day.

Mentally Strong People Don’t Feel Sorry for Themselves

Every minute you spend hosting your own pity party is 60 seconds you delay working on a solution.

5 Ways to Stay Sober While Traveling

Whether for pleasure or business, travel presents challenges for those working hard to stay sober. With a little planning and foresight, however, you can minimize the risk and maximize the chances of actually enjoying your outing rather than feeling as though you’re running a gantlet.

Thriving Under Stressful Work

Although employees often focus on the negative effects of stress at work, when approached in the right way work demands can provide employees with opportunities for growth and development. In this post we discuss what determines whether employees can thrive rather than falter under stress, including how work demands can be perceived and attacked before they become severe.

Susie Orman Schnall Wants You To Find Balance

Susie Orman Schnall, founder of the Balance Project, shares how we can find the perfect work-life balance in our busy lives.

Finding Silver Linings in Hard Times

By Juliana Breines Ph.D. on April 30, 2015 in In Love and War
Major negative life events, such as the death of a loved one, the dissolution of an important relationship, or the diagnosis of a serious illness, can be painful and isolating. But these experiences can also sometimes bring about unexpected positive changes.

Telepressure: The Dark Side of Convenience

The benefits of technology may come with a price for employees.

Learning to Decline the Call to Sugar

If stress relief is a reason you are craving sugar, look for alternative means of stress relief such as exercise, meditation, yoga, and even venting to friends.

Want Less Stress and More Happiness? Try Hope

While many people think of hope as an emotion, researchers describe it as a cognitive theory that is tied to goal setting. Hope researcher, Dr. C.R. Snyder, often described hope with this phrase: “You can get there from here.”

No Time For Figuring Out Your Money?

By Michael F. Kay on April 30, 2015 in Financial Life Focus
Life is busy and maybe even overwhelming at times. Work, family, friends, hitting the gym, scheduling, and taxi service for your kids—it's a lot. Finding time to dig into the meat of your finances can be a battle you ignore at your peril.

Happiness With Life 8: Practice Breakthrough, Not Breakdown

In addition to filling your life with pleasurable and happy moments, how you respond to life’s hardships and hassles also goes a long way toward you leading a happy life. Learn how to make lemonade out of lemons by adopting a Breakthrough rather than a Breakdown way of approaching life.

Care for Nepal

Irrelationship is a shared defensive system that serves the purpose of shielding the participants from true connection. How might this be relevant for something as seemingly clear-cut as disaster response where responders and organizations trying to help are acting from altruistic motives? What can irrelationship tell us about care for the caretaker in disaster relief?

Spring Cleaning: Tips For Finally Clearing That Clutter

Clutter can paralyze and terrorize, to the point where you give up and resign yourself to living with its oppressive, stressful presence. Here are some simple strategies to get rid of existing clutter and change the habits that create it in the first place.

Mitch Lafon’s Heavy-Metal Heart

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 28, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Many people know Mitch Lafon as the host of “One on One with Mitch Lafon,” a part of Talking Metal Digital. But, what many don't know is that Lafon suffers from a cardiac condition known as atrial fibrillation. He shares his story of how he has learned to never miss a beat!

6 Natural Ways To De-Stress

De-stressing is not just about self-soothing and making ourselves feel better after a hard day. In today’s society, de-stressing is as important for our health as brushing our teeth and exercising.

Not Just Curious: What In You Seeks Psychological Insights?

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on April 27, 2015 in Ambigamy
You could be watching cat videos but instead you read PT Blogs. Why is that? Here's one big appetite for psychological insight

5 Steps to End a Toxic Relationship

By Rosemary K.M. Sword on April 27, 2015 in The Time Cure
The tendency to unconsciously seek out toxic relationships frequently starts with past negative experiences when we are children and might carry on throughout our lives. They can become so deeply ingrained in the way we think and feel that we don’t realize we are steeped in toxicity...

Why Feeling Invisible Could Be a Key to Feeling Better

Technology can be used to create the illusion that your body is completely invisible to yourself and others. Experiments show that this reduces social anxiety in stressful social situations. This finding may lead to exciting new treatment strategies.

Keep Your Body Tuned Up

Your body is a complicated machine, too

Is Your Workplace Stressing You Out?

Being constantly stressed out is so universal in America that many laborers have accepted it as unpleasant, but a way of life. Remember, you are not powerless, and the biggest changes in life can sprout from a small change in self. Take charge of your life by following these steps to alleviate some stress.

I Feel Your Pain: The Neuroscience of Empathy

Mirror neurons help us detect pain and emotion in others and evidence that empathy has biological roots.

My Son Is Afraid of the Uncanny Valley

By Thomas Hills Ph.D. on April 22, 2015 in Statistical Life
Isn't it a moral violation that images we would never choose to look at pop up on our computers—AND INTO OUR HEADS—without our permission? I'm all for free speech (and images). But really, shouldn't we be able to not look?

10 Ways Mindfulness and Meditation Promote Well-Being

This post includes a "Top Ten" list of ways that mindfulness and meditation promote well-being based on the latest scientific research.

Does Emotional Attachment to an Owner Change in Older Dogs?

Although older dogs may appear to be more placid and less emotionally responsive, physiological measures show that this is not the case. They may actually be reacting to stress to a greater degree than they did when they were younger.

4 Lifestyle Changes That Will Boost Your Mental Health

When we seek help for a mental health condition, we can expect to hear about various medications and treatment options, but what’s often missing from the conversation is any talk of lifestyle changes.

Homework: An Hour a Day Is All the Experts Say

How much time does your teen spend doing busy school work each night? According to a recent study, if it's more than one hour…then it's too much.

Moral Motivation and God's Rewards

What humans' moral intuitions suggest about the relative merits of religious versus secular accounts of moral motivation.