Stress Essential Reads

Looking to Our Past: Escapism or Exploration?

The past is gone, cannot be changed, and cannot return. Is revisiting it in memory a reluctance to live in the present?

RID Yourself of Psychological Distress

By Tim Carey Ph.D. on November 19, 2015 In Control
When correcting any problem, the way in which the trouble is understood will have a large bearing on how effective and efficient the remediation efforts are.

Stress Relief in Seven Minutes, Doggie Style

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on November 19, 2015 Animals and Us
Yale University researchers have found that just seven minutes in the presence of a dog named Finn caused a major decline in anxiety levels of med school students and a big upswing in their moods.

On Stress, Anxiety, and Procrastination

Are you tired of feeling drained by anxiety and stress? Use calming solutions to bring about meaningful changes.

Five Common Misconceptions About Trauma

Contrary to popular opinion, experiencing growth after trauma is far more common than PTSD. The new science of post-traumatic growth has found in thousands of studies that up to 90 percent of trauma survivors eventually attest to a renewed zest for life, major empathetic growth, and increased emotional maturity.

Why Road Ragers (and Others) Rage

Hyper-aggressive people don't view their outrageous behavior as you and I do. In their minds, they are underdogs, avenging angels, agents of justice—anything but malevolent malefactors.

How Narcissists Really React When Things Don’t Go Their Way

Finding the smart way through to a solution can get you through many predicaments in life. Dealing flexibility is generally the best strategy, one that narcissists surprisingly can use.

Red Flags for Emotional Caretakers, Part Two

Do you find it hard to notice when you are giving up your own needs and feelings and caretaking others? Here are some red flags to help you notice when you are doing too much caretaking of others.

Why Do Employees Most Often Quit?

By Victor Lipman on October 16, 2015 Mind of the Manager
A new survey offers insights and answers. Think autonomy, micromanagement, culture and relationships...

Where Did Colleges Go Wrong?

By Hara Estroff Marano on October 14, 2015 Nation of Wimps
'Puppy days' and trigger warnings exemplify how colleges are increasingly in the business of infantilizing students rather than developing them.

5 Myths About Burnout (and the Truth We Need to Understand)

It’s Sunday night and you’re dreading the thought of going to work in the morning. You used to be able to juggle all of the demands of the job as you leaned into success, but now something is missing. You don’t feel as “plugged into” the projects you’re working on, but you know it’s not the right time to change jobs. Is this burnout? Are you just stressed out?

Here is a Powerful Acronym to Help Your Child Manage Stress!

Kids do better in life when they learn how to calm down and solve problems! Borrowing from Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) the word "ACCEPTS" provides prompts for valuable coping skills for children, teens, and adults to handle stress. To help your child or teen better deal with stress, take a look at the power of the 7 skills embodied in "ACCEPTS"

How Gratitude Can Help Your Career

By Peter Bregman on October 01, 2015 How We Work
I was opening the mail (the real mail, the one delivered by an actual, live person) and between the bills and solicitations, was a single letter, addressed to me, in sloppy — but recognizable — handwriting. Recognizable because the handwriting was mine.

Let It Go! Your Stuff, That Is

By Sherry Hamby Ph.D. on September 30, 2015 The Web of Violence
The benefits of improving your immediate physical environment are under-appreciated.

Time Management 101

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on September 29, 2015 Head of the Class
College students, especially those in their first year, often struggle with time management. How can they learn to use their time wisely while still reserving some for recreation and socializing? Documenting where and how they spend (and often lose) their time is a good first step.

What Do Hypoactive Sexual Desire and PTSD Have in Common?

By Jeffrey Lieberman M.D. on September 22, 2015 Shrink Speak
Science and social pressures influence how and when drugs are developed by the pharmaceutical industry.

Can a Relationship Give You as Strong a Jolt as Caffeine?

By Erica B Slotter Ph.D. on September 18, 2015 Me, You, & Us
Need an energy boost? Try skipping the coffee or mid afternoon snack and think about your romantic partner instead!

20 Signs That Your Boss May Be a Psychopath

When psychopathy hits the workplace, the effects can be devastating, especially if that psychopath is your boss. Take this 20-item quiz to find out if this recently-discovered form of the dark triad personality may be affecting you and those you love in ways you didn’t realize.

Secrets of La Pura Vida

By Jaime L. Kurtz Ph.D. on September 09, 2015 Happy Trails
Costa Rica's abundant natural beauty - a source of happiness?

On Wound Collectors

By Joe Navarro M.A. on September 06, 2015 Spycatcher
What do many mass murderers have in common? Something many see but fail to recognize in advance.

The Most Important Way to Fight Insomnia

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, or CBT-I, is a powerful non-drug treatment. Find out one of the main principles that underlies its effectiveness.

Memories of Trauma

By David Myers Ph.D. on August 26, 2015 Talk Psych
Imagine yourself as a traumatized passenger on a transatlantic flight that has run out of fuel and is seemingly destined to crash in the ocean. Such was the real life experience of psychologist Margaret MacKinnon, who, with colleagues, later compared passengers' memories with actual flight events. Their findings teach us a lesson about human memory.

What Mindfulness App Is Right for You?

New study reveals the top 4 mindfulness apps. Which one fits your personality best?

4 Ways to Keep Your Perfectionism from Getting You Down

Always wanting your life, and everything in it, to be perfect can become a thankless enterprise. In addition to the fact that perfection is almost impossible to achieve, striving for the ideal can cause your stress levels to mount. These 4 tips will help you keep perfectionism under control.

The Amygdala Is NOT the Brain's Fear Center

The amygdala is not a "fear" center out of which effuses the feeling of being afraid. "Fear" is a cognitively assembled conscious experience that is based on threat detection, arousal, attention, perception, memory, and other neural processes.

10 Ways to Test Your Job’s Stress Quotient

All jobs can be stressful at times – deadlines, conflict with a colleague, a heavy workload. But how can you tell if your job is TOO stressful? Here is a way to calculate your job stress.

7 Ways Childhood Adversity Changes Your Brain

If you’ve ever wondered why you’ve been struggling a little too hard for a little too long with chronic emotional and physical health conditions that just won’t abate, feeling as if you’ve been swimming against some invisible current that never ceases, a new field of scientific research may offer you hope, answers, and healing insights.

"To Give Our Work Lives Meaning"

By Tim Leberecht on August 04, 2015 The Romance of Work
Last year Brigid Schulte’s book, "Overwhelmed: How to Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time," was greeted with wide acclaim and bestseller status—and for good reason. Despite the technological amenities at our disposal, we feel more stretched than ever, clinging to the idea that we can find balance—even if we don’t know how exactly.

It’s Not 'All in Your Head.' It’s in Your Brain.

Current research helps us to understand that some physical illnesses, especially those that are not easily explained, are not made up at all. They are the result of complex neuroendocrine responses due to heredity, trauma and stress. The symptoms are real. They are not all in one’s head.

The Procrastination Fallacy of Working Better Under Pressure

Are you tired of feeling pressured and rushed? Try a simple two-step solution.