Stress Essential Reads

If You Want People To Listen, Stop Talking

By Peter Bregman on May 26, 2015 in How We Work
George had a different edge, which wasn’t immediately obvious to me because I was listening to what George said. His power was in what he didn’t say.

The Importance of Detaching From Work

Typically when we hear that someone is “detached”, or is actively seeking “detachment”, this is viewed negatively. There are, however, instances where a certain amount of detachment is a good thing; in fact, there is considerable evidence that regularly detaching from work is an important key to thriving under stressful conditions.

Losing My Mindfulness: A Tale of Spilled Milk and Blue M&Ms

What I know to be true experientially is what scientific research now proves—that mindfulness meditation literally changes the brain. Take a brief thirty seconds and give it a try. Right here, right now.

The Definitive Way To Respond to Others' Mistakes

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on May 13, 2015 in Feeling It
Mistakes happen. The question is - how should we respond? Research shows that compassion will help us come out ahead.

5 Things Successful Working Parents Give Up

Successful parents focus their spare time and energy on raising the children - not wishing they didn't have to work

Do Dogs Have Empathy for Human Stress and Discomfort?

Dogs and humans seem to respond in the same way when they hear the crying sounds of the distressed baby.

Are You Suffering From Telepressure? Time for the Cure

The benefits of technology may come with a price for employees.

Does Emotional Attachment to an Owner Change in Older Dogs?

Although older dogs may appear to be more placid and less emotionally responsive, physiological measures show that this is not the case. They may actually be reacting to stress to a greater degree than they did when they were younger.

10 Tips to Change From Reactive to Proactive in Situations

All of us encounter experiences in life when we may be temporally overwhelmed by a negative emotion, be it anger, pressure, nervousness, despair, or confusion. In these situations, how we choose to “master the moment” can make the difference between proactive versus reactive, and confidence versus insecurity. Here are ten ways to be less reactive in difficult situations...

6 Tips for Managing Life With a Control Freak

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on April 17, 2015 in Fixing Families
It's difficult to live with someone who is always controlling in a variety of ways. Some tips for not taking it personally and for changing the dynamics.

Getting Existential with Josh Rouse

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 17, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Josh Rouse shares how he has been able to conquer anxiety through mindfulness.

Are Your Worst Nightmares Also Everyone Else's?

By E E Smith on April 16, 2015 in Not Born Yesterday
They are the grim subject of several centuries-old paintings, in which a black horse (or "night mare") hovers near a sleeping figure. They have been the terrifying theme of movies, past and present––from "I Wake Up Screaming" (1941), to the latest "Nightmare on Elm Street" flick. So, what exactly is a nightmare?

Parental Warmth: Simple, Powerful, and Often Challenging

Amidst all the chatter about parenting styles and techniques, it is easy to forget about the importance of warmth. This overlooked dimension is found to be critical to child development in study after study, so why don’t we give it the attention it deserves?

The Joy of Distraction

Negative affect is among the most important triggers of self-control failures.

The 4 Styles of Humor

What do you find funny, and what sort of humor appeals to you? Research has focused on different humor styles, and distinguishes four types.

The Emotional "Trials" of Trial Independence (ages 18 - 23)

For many last stage adolescents (18 - 23) independence can prove too much of a good thing when they flounder in so much freedom, become stressed out, and experience emotional crisis as a result. At this juncture, parents can be of help.

8 Tips For Teasing Lovingly To Relieve Partnership Tension

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on April 13, 2015 in Ambigamy
Healthy teasing can make partners feel safe and free. Unhealthy teasing can make partners feel unsafe and unfree. Here are a few ideas about how to stay on the healthy side of teasing, especially when your working to expand how safe and free you both feel.

5 Reasons Studies Say You Have to Choose Your Friends Wisely

While it makes sense to befriend people you come in contact with regularly—like neighbors and co-workers—research shows the importance of being selective about who's in your social circle.

Do Sleep Issues in Teens Predict Drug and Alcohol Problems?

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on April 09, 2015 in Sleep Newzzz
Despite their seemingly boundless energy—and propensity to stay up late at night—teens need more sleep than adults.

How to Stop Working All The Time

By Ron Friedman Ph.D. on April 08, 2015 in Glue
Most attempts at behavior change fail for the same reason—they’re too ambitious. Here are 3 concrete tips that make disconnecting from work a lot easier.

Lessening Alzheimer’s Discordance: Five Recommendations

Dealing with the differing views of the illness held by the person with Alzheimer's disease and the care partner is a challenging but critical task. Lessening this discordance enormously reduces care partner stress, and is valuable for the person with the disease, as well.

Uncontested Divorce Can Improve a Relationship

By Wendy Paris on April 07, 2015 in Splitopia
New legal processes can improve a relationhip on the other side of marriage. Some of the most exciting innovations in divorce are coming from the legal professionals.

Should We Call it Postpartum Depression?

For reasons that are both straightforward and extremely complex, I just think the terminology should be different.

The Psychology of Spring Cleaning

By Jonathan Fader Ph.D. on April 03, 2015 in The New You
For many of us the onset of spring is a reminder to start our annual spring overhauls – decluttering, organizing, and cleaning. While spring cleaning has the obvious benefits of an organized closet, a sparkling counter top, and possibly more open spaces, more importantly, it has been associated with improved mood, decreased stress, and heightened creativity.

A Happy Life or a Meaningful One? They Are Not the Same

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on April 02, 2015 in Living Single
Although experiencing happiness and meaningfulness in your life often go together, they are not exactly the same. Research shows what kinds of experiences are markers of a life that is happy but not meaningful, and the (sometimes surprising) experiences that comprise a life that is meaningful, but not happy.

Are People Who Express Anger Unhealthy?

By Art Markman Ph.D. on March 31, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
Long-term stress is bad for you. Decades of research demonstrates that when people are stressed over a long period of time, their immune system is suppressed. These individuals experience health problems including heart disease and high blood pressure.

The Backlash Against Psychiatric Diagnoses

Only in mental health does there exist the idea that we should avoid diagnostic terms if the cause of the suffering is great. This well-intentioned but misguided effort only alienates people further.

Teenagers Are From Earth

Our black-and-white thinking about adolescence is getting in our way.

Work-Life Balance is Dead

By Ron Friedman Ph.D. on March 27, 2015 in Glue
Technology has made work-life balance obsolete. Here's why we should aim for work-life integration instead.

The Germanwings Crash, and How We Can Think About It

As uncomfortable as it is to accept, we now have to deal with the fact that a pilot locked his fellow pilot out of the cockpit and intentionally flew a plane filled with passengers into a mountainside.