Stress Essential Reads

New Research Tools to Test Brain Injury

By Eric Newhouse on July 01, 2015 in Invisible Wounds
Scientists at UCLA have been studying the brains of retired football players to determine what types of brain damage are caused by repeated concussions, and new technologies are allowing them to examine living brains. The next step will involve combat vets to see how they differ from NFL players and from Alzheimer's victims.

The No-Vacation Nation

By Shimi Kang M.D. on July 01, 2015 in The Dolphin Way
Who killed summer vacation? That’s the million dollar question - literally. We’ve all seen it. Most of us have even been this person at one point or another: You know, the one who sits poolside at a resort glued to their smartphone or laptop, and whose entire holiday itinerary revolves around whether or not WiFi will be readily available.

The Power of Integrative Medicine When All Else Fails

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in Feeling It
A new generation of patients and doctors is changing the face of American medicine. It's about more than curing disease now—it's health for the whole person.

Saving Sleep Medicine

Sleep is critical to life, and sleep medicine important to health.

The Art of Idleness

By Neel Burton M.D. on June 25, 2015 in Hide and Seek
Research suggests that people will find any excuse to keep busy.

Sibling Incest in the News

Having worked in the child sexual abuse field for 30 some years, I am continually struck with a sense of sadness when yet another family comes forward with admissions of sibling sexual abuse. Rather than judgment it is important to be aware of treatment and healing options. Jumping to quick labeling without understanding the help needed is dangerous.

Young People, Not Alone in Their Despair

What is that cautionary tale? Things may not always—if ever—be as they seem.

Do You Know Your Health Destiny?

Would you like to change your health? Do you want to know more about how your genetics don't have to be your destiny? Then tune in to an interview with Eva Selhub, MD, author of "Your Health Destiny."

The Psychology of Web Browsing

Understanding the human need for control offers a powerful tool for enhancing customer experience. I recently helped one of the world’s largest and most influential news organizations analyze their website. They were trying to push video content by having it load automatically on their homepage.The extensive efforts to push the content created the opposite reaction..

Do Warning Signs Apply to Parents of Kids With Autism?

Many parents of children with autism find themselves becoming accustomed to routine discomfort, and, as a result, may not acknowledge typical warning signs as an indication to seek outside support.

How to Prevent Burnout From Spreading Like Wildfire

Burnout has been described as the "new normal", but does it really have to be inevitable? Stress levels are escalating and wreaking havoc on individuals and organizations. Today's market pressures warrant preventative measures and collective action to helping people and the institutions they work strive towards greater health.

Should I Quit?

Science says, "You should quit your job."

If You Want People To Listen, Stop Talking

By Peter Bregman on May 26, 2015 in How We Work
George had a different edge, which wasn’t immediately obvious to me because I was listening to what George said. His power was in what he didn’t say.

The Importance of Detaching From Work

Typically when we hear that someone is “detached”, or is actively seeking “detachment”, this is viewed negatively. There are, however, instances where a certain amount of detachment is a good thing; in fact, there is considerable evidence that regularly detaching from work is an important key to thriving under stressful conditions.

Losing My Mindfulness: A Tale of Spilled Milk and Blue M&Ms

What I know to be true experientially is what scientific research now proves—that mindfulness meditation literally changes the brain. Take a brief thirty seconds and give it a try. Right here, right now.

The Definitive Way To Respond to Others' Mistakes

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on May 13, 2015 in Feeling It
Mistakes happen. The question is: How should we respond? Research shows that compassion will help us come out ahead.

5 Things Successful Working Parents Give Up

Successful parents focus their spare time and energy on raising the children - not wishing they didn't have to work

Do Dogs Have Empathy for Human Stress and Discomfort?

Dogs and humans seem to respond in the same way when they hear the crying sounds of the distressed baby.

Are You Suffering From Telepressure? Time for the Cure

The benefits of technology may come with a price for employees.

Does Emotional Attachment to an Owner Change in Older Dogs?

Although older dogs may appear to be more placid and less emotionally responsive, physiological measures show that this is not the case. They may actually be reacting to stress to a greater degree than they did when they were younger.

10 Tips to Change From Reactive to Proactive in Situations

All of us encounter experiences in life when we may be temporally overwhelmed by a negative emotion, be it anger, pressure, nervousness, despair, or confusion. In these situations, how we choose to “master the moment” can make the difference between proactive versus reactive, and confidence versus insecurity. Here are ten ways to be less reactive in difficult situations...

Are Your Worst Nightmares Also Everyone Else's?

By E E Smith on April 16, 2015 in Not Born Yesterday
They are the grim subject of several centuries-old paintings, in which a black horse (or "night mare") hovers near a sleeping figure. They have been the terrifying theme of movies, past and present––from "I Wake Up Screaming" (1941), to the latest "Nightmare on Elm Street" flick. So, what exactly is a nightmare?

Parental Warmth: Simple, Powerful, and Often Challenging

Amidst all the chatter about parenting styles and techniques, it is easy to forget about the importance of warmth. This overlooked dimension is found to be critical to child development in study after study, so why don’t we give it the attention it deserves?

The Joy of Distraction

Negative affect is among the most important triggers of self-control failures.

The 4 Styles of Humor

What do you find funny, and what sort of humor appeals to you? Research has focused on different humor styles, and distinguishes four types.

8 Tips For Teasing Lovingly To Relieve Partnership Tension

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on April 13, 2015 in Ambigamy
Healthy teasing can make partners feel safe and free. Unhealthy teasing can make partners feel unsafe and unfree. Here are a few ideas about how to stay on the healthy side of teasing, especially when your working to expand how safe and free you both feel.

5 Reasons Studies Say You Have to Choose Your Friends Wisely

While it makes sense to befriend people you come in contact with regularly—like neighbors and co-workers—research shows the importance of being selective about who's in your social circle.

Do Sleep Issues in Teens Predict Drug and Alcohol Problems?

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on April 09, 2015 in Sleep Newzzz
Despite their seemingly boundless energy—and propensity to stay up late at night—teens need more sleep than adults.

How to Stop Working All The Time

By Ron Friedman Ph.D. on April 08, 2015 in Glue
Most attempts at behavior change fail for the same reason—they’re too ambitious. Here are 3 concrete tips that make disconnecting from work a lot easier.

Lessening Alzheimer’s Discordance: Five Recommendations

Dealing with the differing views of the illness held by the person with Alzheimer's disease and the care partner is a challenging but critical task. Lessening this discordance enormously reduces care partner stress, and is valuable for the person with the disease, as well.