Essential Reads

The Shot Clock and the Body Clock

How circadian rhythms win basketball games

March Madness

Why you should consider mental health services when choosing a college

The Bourgeois Revolution

Our fantasies and expectations about family life arose two centuries ago

Does Creativity have its Dark Side?

When creativity turns malevolent, you'll want to stay out of its way

Recent Posts on Sport and Competition

One Key to Happiness, Success, and Resilience

By Sherry Hamby Ph.D. on March 30, 2015 in The Web of Violence
What is your goal in life? To be happy? Successful? Resilient? How about “psychologically regulated"? That last one might not be a popular response to the question I posed, but it should be. And I will tell you why.

The Facts of (Business) Life

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on March 30, 2015 in A Sideways View
Is the Business School degree the ideal passport to health, wealth and happiness?

The Important Lesson in March Madness

By Kory Floyd Ph.D. on March 29, 2015 in Affectionado
March Madness reminds us that winning and losing are a natural part of life. We should teach our children the same.

Pressure Anxiety: A Contemporary Plague

By Hendrie Weisinger on March 29, 2015 in Thicken Your Skin
Pressure Anxiety---if you don't have it, chances are great you know many who do!

The 4 Pillars of Great Leadership

Over 100 years of research on leadership has clearly determined the keys to leader success. There are four key factors that make a leader effective, and here they are.

The Shot Clock and the Body Clock

By Alex Korb Ph.D. on March 27, 2015 in PreFrontal Nudity
During March Madness most people overlook important aspects of neuroscience that contribute to peak athletic performance.

How Does Practice Hardwire Long-Term Muscle Memory?

Why is it that once you've learned how to ride a bicycle or serve a tennis ball that you never forget the muscle memory involved in these actions? A team of neuroscientists recently pinpointed a new mechanism behind the consolidation of long-term motor memory.

The Case of the Incentivized Applicant

How much is a job interview worth?

Who Participates in Dog-sporting Events and Why?

Although people can be highly competitive in the various dog-sports, recent research shows that internal motives and social benefits are more important than trophies and accolades.

The Effective, Ethical, and Less Stressful Job Interview

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on March 25, 2015 in How To Do Life
Sitting there passively and giving canned answers is a formula for failure.

March Madness

By Jeffrey Lieberman M.D. on March 24, 2015 in Shrink Speak
Students and parents rarely consider that they might need mental health services during college and often urgently. For this reason, they would be well advised to include the quality and availability of mental health services along with traditional considerations as they decide on the college of their choice.

This New View of Memory Can Help You Improve Yours

When it comes to improving your memory, you may have to revise everything you thought can help. New research shows that to remember more, you might have to try remembering less.

Yes, You Can Get Addicted to Exercise

For approximately 3 percent of the population, striving to stay fit does them more harm than good.

Are You a Free-Range Parent? You Should Be

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on March 23, 2015 in The Power of Prime
Children need to have the freedom to explore their worlds on their own without parents acting like helicopters, always hovering around to "protect" them for the apparently dangerous world in which they now. Yet, our children are fenced in, literally and metaphorically, almost every moment of every day.

Pressure: Meet The Villain

By Hendrie Weisinger on March 23, 2015 in Thicken Your Skin
Pressure downgrades your "cognitive success tools," compromises your ethics, makes you a damaging parent, and can destroy your marriage. You'd be wise to learn how to manage pressure.

The Bourgeois Revolution

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 23, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Many of our most powerful fantasies and expectations about marriage and family life emerged two centuries ago.

If Selfish Genes Build Brains, Why Aren’t We All Solipsists?

Contrary to what you might think, the “selfish gene” paradigm does not imply that we should be self-centered to the point of believing that only we exist.

A Peculiar Work Situation

By Fredric Neuman M.D. on March 22, 2015 in Fighting Fear
There may be worse problems at work than simply being paid very little and being asked to do the job of two or three people all at once.

Book Review: Wisdom from the Couch

By Ryan Howes PhD, ABPP on March 22, 2015 in In Therapy
Dr. Jennifer Kunst shares the warmer, friendlier side of Kleinian psychology in this interview and book review.

The Pathways of Experience

When asked to describe the most important challenges of living, Freud is reputed to have said – for there is no firm evidence of his doing so – that every person should “work and love.”

Does Creativity have its Dark Side?

We are used to thinking of creativity as an entirely positive attribute. However, new research on malevolent creativity suggests that the truly creative may put their novel thinking to dangerous uses under the right circumstances.

The Neurobiology of BDSM Sexual Practice

How can one experience pain, either the physical pain of a smack on the tush or the emotional pain of humiliation, as pleasurable? Aren’t pain and pleasure diametrically opposed? The answer, informed by neurobiology, is that the opposite of pleasure isn’t pain but ennui— a lack of interest in sensation and experience.

The Urge to Connect

A 3 billion year perspective on where the human race is headed

Yes, You Should Get Paid to Watch Basketball at Work

By Ron Friedman Ph.D. on March 19, 2015 in Glue
Think watching basketball on the job is a waste of company time? Think again.

Do You Like Your Sister?

Sympathy, compassion, understanding, respect, generosity and a willingness to forgive are essential features of every important relationship, including ones between members of an immediate family.

Do Dog People and Cat People Differ in Terms of Dominance?

New data suggest that dog people and cat people are selecting their preferred pet because it complements their own personality.

An Analytical Approach to Finding Your Career

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on March 18, 2015 in How To Do Life
What are your core skills, interests, values, and non-negotiables?

Science and the Online Dating Profile

Online dating is the new singles bar, one in which your words won't be drowned out by the music. But which words should you use? There is some scientific evidence about relatively more effective ways to turn an online contact into a real huggable moment.

Treating William Shakespeare

Asking which of the things I did that worked and which didn’t is exactly the same as asking which things the patient does in response I should feel rewarded by.

Don’t Close More State Hospitals

Should we bring back the state hospital system?