Essential Reads

Modern Hunter-Gatherers Show We Evolved to Stay Active

By Christopher Bergland on November 29, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
New research on the lifestyle habits of a rare population of hunter-gatherers reaffirms the universal health benefits of staying physically active.

Love and Sports

By Michael W. Austin Ph.D. on November 21, 2016 in Ethics for Everyone
If it is intentionally cultivated, the virtue of love can flourish in athletic contexts.

Daily Physical Activity Boosts Brain Power and Self-Control

By Christopher Bergland on November 14, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Physical activity has the power to boost your brain power and increase your self-control, according to a new study.

Study Identifies No. 1 Source of Motivation to Exercise More

By Christopher Bergland on October 30, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study identifies a simple and effective source of motivation that can inspire you to become more physically active.

More Posts on Sport and Competition

The Rise and Rapid Reduction of 'Rowdy' Ronda Rousey

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on November 24, 2015 in Black Belt Brain
Even though we enjoy watching the best athletes demonstrate their skills, we also like to see skillful, but super-confident athletes get beaten. Is it because we cannot identify with them?

Why Exercise Isn't Always a Panacea

Just because some exercise is great for us doesn’t mean these benefits extend indefinitely. It turns out that yes, you can exercise too much: Beyond a certain point of exertion, our bodies—and our minds—start to break down.

My First Marathon

By Charlotte N. Markey Ph.D. on November 19, 2015 in Smart People Don’t Diet
Want to run a marathon? Perseverance and luck may be all you need. For me, it was mostly about continuing to put one foot in front of the other and hoping for the best.

Three Brain Doctors Expose “Untold Story” in “Concussion"

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on November 17, 2015 in Brain Trauma
As audiences worldwide examine the film’s controversial CTE topic, Drs. Daniel G. Amen, Theodore Henderson and Harry Kerasidis, point to advanced treatments and tools available now to battle the brain injury epidemic.

How Athletes Can Address the Psychology of Injury

By Laura M Miele Ph.D. on November 17, 2015 in The Whole Athlete
What we can learn from Lamar Odom.
David Bruce

Letting Go of Fear of Failure-Part IV

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on November 17, 2015 in The Power of Prime
Fear of failure is about the perceptions that you hold about failure and, for the vast majority of people, those perceptions are entirely disconnected from the reality of their lives. You perceive that bad things will happen if you fail, but the reality is that nothing particularly bad, aside from some disappointment, will likely result from a failure.

Who Should Help Pay for Yoga?

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on November 17, 2015 in Urban Survival
Here are four reasons why health insurers should pay attention to yoga programs and help us pay for them.

Motivation Is Tied to the Strength of Your Brain Connections

By Christopher Bergland on November 16, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Would you identify yourself as someone who is highly motivated or more apathetic? Neuroscientists at Oxford University recently discovered a neurobiological mechanism that might explain why some of us are inherently more ambitious than others. The findings also explain the neuroscience of why "Just Do It" is such a motivational slogan.
Ed Bozman

The Real Fear in Fear of Failure: Part III

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on November 10, 2015 in The Power of Prime
The real fear is not failure, the meaning you attach to failure, or even total failure. Instead, the real fear of failure is about the fear of experiencing the painful emotions that young people think they will suffer if they fail.

"Superfluidity" and the "Hot Hand" Are Synonymous

By Christopher Bergland on November 10, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Recently, David Remnick wrote a brilliant article in the New Yorker, Bob Dylan and the “Hot Hand," which reminded me of concepts I’ve been trying to convey about the extraordinary—but also universal—experience of “superfluidity.” After reading Remnick's essay, it's clear to me that "the hot hand" and "superfluidity" occur both in sports and the creative process.

Why 'More Research Needed' May Be a Concussion Cop Out

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on November 06, 2015 in Brain Trauma
People may dismiss concussions as the great unknown but much is known. We can create advanced tools and practical protocols for concussion management.

Jeering the Mets

Gloating over the Met’s loss, jeering at Daniel Murphy's error, conflating a “failure” with an identity is precisely the mentality that twists lifestyle differences into hatred and homophobia.

Will Obesity Bankrupt the United States in the Near Future?

By Christopher Bergland on November 03, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
As of November 2015, over 30 percent of adults in the United States are considered obese. The economic cost of the obesity epidemic is mind-boggling. Two new studies report that obesity-related healthcare is costing American taxpayers and individuals hundreds of billions annually in medical bills. What can each of us do to reduce the healthcare costs of obesity?

Why We Must Listen to Dahkota Kicking Bear Brown

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on November 03, 2015 in Brick by Brick
By sharing his story, Dahkota Kicking Bear Brown shows that if you stand up for your convictions, you can fight racism and make real change happen in the world

Do Professional Sports Reflect Modern American Whining?

By Stanton Peele on November 02, 2015 in Addiction in Society
Are sports stars and their management reflecting a culture-wide loss of authority?

High Tech Medicine Can Be Bad For Your Health

By Allen J Frances M.D. on October 28, 2015 in Saving Normal
Too many doctors have gotten into the habit of treating lab tests, not patients. This can lead to over treatment and disastrous medical mistakes.

Howler Monkeys Have a Deep Voice or Big Balls But Not Both

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on October 22, 2015 in Animal Emotions
Howler monkeys have low sexy calls or big balls, but not both. While this research "has no practical application to human mate choice … some research has suggested that men with deep voices have more sex partners, and therefore more opportunities to reproduce. But another study showed lower sperm quality in deeper-voiced men." Oh wouldn't it be nice if … or would it?
Pixabay

Bike Helmets for Brain Safety

Is wearing a bike helmet really necessary? And what about helmets for pee-wee football?

Baseball is Magic (When You're Seven Years Old)

By Steven Schlozman M.D. on October 18, 2015 in Grand Rounds
Why Baseball is Magic in the Low Light of October

Neuroscientists Decrypt the Mystery of Rapid Eye Movements

By Christopher Bergland on October 15, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
In a groundbreaking study, neuroscientists have decoded the mysterious brain mechanics behind rapid eye movements.

The Playground is Dangerous, But the Soccer Field Isn't?

By Richard Rende Ph.D. on October 15, 2015 in Inside Parenting
Parents may seem overprotective about play, but they aren't about sports. So are parents really risk aversive, or are they making decisions about potential benefits of activities?

Why Are FanDuel Television Advertisements So Effective?

Fantasy sports companies make ingenious use of psychology to attract new customers and grow rapidly.

7 Ways to Protect Your Joints in Yoga

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on October 12, 2015 in Urban Survival
Here are useful tips to make sure your wrists, shoulders, hips, and elbows stay safe when doing yoga.

Five Ways Teams and Leaders Can Deal with Negative Attention

By Laura M Miele Ph.D. on October 12, 2015 in The Whole Athlete
Great communication and mental health awareness are present in successful teams like the New England Patriots.

The Hyena That Wouldn't Laugh

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on October 12, 2015 in How To Do Life
What is laughable about us?

Is Excessive Screen Time Slowly Undermining Our Resilience?

By Christopher Bergland on October 10, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
What is the long-term cost of excessive screen time on our individual and collective well-being?

When Did Baseball Managers Become Mensches?

By Stanton Peele on October 10, 2015 in Addiction in Society
On-field baseball and other sports management seemingly has matured. Now if only the players would follow suit!

Do People See Emotions in Your Face That Aren't There?

By Gwendolyn Seidman Ph.D. on October 08, 2015 in Close Encounters
New research shows that women tend to attribute more hostility to other women's faces than is actually present. The notion of “resting bitch face”, the tendency for a woman’s neutral face expression to appear angry or annoyed, has been catching on in the media. These studies suggest that whether women detect resting bitch face may be due to competition with other women.

Is Runner's High Our Evolutionary Antidote for Laziness?

By Christopher Bergland on October 07, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Two new studies suggest that our ability to experience runner's high may have evolved as a way to motivate humans to enjoy physical exertion.

Two Low-Cost Ways to Avoid High-Cost Concussion Challenge

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on October 06, 2015 in Brain Trauma
Concussions are costing millions of dollars in research, treatment and prevention. Unfortunately, they can also cost lives. Here are two simple, low-tech, low-cost ways to get our heads in the game.