Essential Reads

Trying to Explain the Inexplicable

By Gary Smith Ph.D. on September 23, 2016 in What the Luck?
We are tempted to look for psychological explanations for successes and failures, when the more convincing explanation is simply that people get lucky—and luck is fleeting.

View Concussion as a “Brain Sprain”

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on September 20, 2016 in Brain Trauma
Defining concussions gets a variety of answers, so neurologist Harry Kerasidis outlines the brain injury and symptoms, by comparing it to the common ankle sprain.

Why Louisiana Defendants Say, "Geaux Tigers!"

Two economists suggest a surprising source of racial bias in juvenile sentencing.

Who Am I? Someone? Or Nobody?

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on August 24, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
Celebrity is competitive. The outrageously competitive have no limits on what they do to get noticed. Winning often means being a bigger jerk than anyone else is willing to be.

More Posts on Sport and Competition

And the Winner Is... Miss Universe 2016

By Hilary Levey Friedman Ph.D. on December 21, 2015 in Playing to Win
Why are so many people (especially non-pageant fans) fascinated by the mis-crowning?

How to Start a Play Committee in Your Community

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on December 19, 2015 in Moral Landscapes
People of all ages love to play and all you have to do to build a play community is find the playful folks around you.

12 Days of Non-Tech Gift Giving

By Victoria L. Dunckley M.D. on December 19, 2015 in Mental Wealth
Get "real" toys this year! Here are 12 gift categories for children that encourage imagination, bonding, movement, and of course loads of family fun.
Jake Barnes

Psychological Rehab After Sports Injury

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on December 18, 2015 in The Power of Prime
When athletes get injured, their minds get damaged too, yet little attention is paid to the importance of “mental rehab” to a complete and timely recovery and return to sport.

My Advice to a Baseball Player in a Slump

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on December 18, 2015 in How To Do Life
Lessons that may apply to any of us that are on a bad streak.
Mitchell Gunn, used with permission

An Olympic Champion’s Holiday Gift #2: Fight

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on December 14, 2015 in The Power of Prime
It’s normal to get nervous before a competition, particularly a big one. You’re putting all of your efforts on the line and you want to succeed really badly.
Mitchell Gunn with permission

An Olympic Champion’s 3 Holiday Gifts: #1 is Disappointment

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on December 11, 2015 in The Power of Prime
No one likes to be disappointed. Your heart aches for the opportunity lost. But not allowing yourself to feel disappointed is another opportunity lost and a lesson not learned.

How Important are Mental Components of Success?

Sports psychologists think mental aspects of performance are so critical, they make careers out of it.

Demystifying Sport Concussion Baseline Testing

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on December 08, 2015 in Brain Trauma
While the controversial movie "Concussion" draws attention, one important preseason test plays an important supporting role. Here's the bottom line on baseline testing.

Giving Parkinson's Disease a Kung Fu Kick

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on December 08, 2015 in Black Belt Brain
Physical activity--like martial arts training--can serve an important rehabilitative role in neurological disorders. Tai chi training can give Parkinson's a good ol' kung fu kick.

Yoga for Stress Relief

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on December 08, 2015 in Urban Survival
Find out how you can use yoga for stress relief.

The Secret to Great Leadership

By Ryan M. Niemiec Psy.D. on December 07, 2015 in What Matters Most?
Strong leaders agree on one thing: When it comes to great leadership, the first principle is “leader, know thyself.” The latest research takes this a step further.

Letter from a Former Olympian Who Needs a Career

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on December 07, 2015 in How To Do Life
Even most medalists struggle after The Games. Bu there are good options.
en.wikipedia.org

The World Sociopath Olympics

Forget the Nobel Prize. We're now ready for the Madoff Prize.

Why are so Many Rape Allegations being Ignored?

By Azadeh Aalai Ph.D. on December 01, 2015 in The First Impression
Did NFL quarterback Jameis Winston get a free pass to sexually assault a student during his tenure at FSU just because he was a star on the football field?

The Unseen Human Being: Reflective Gear Saves Lives

By Christopher Bergland on November 30, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
As we approach the shortest days of the year, it’s important to remember to wear reflective gear anytime you are walking, jogging, or cycling on public roadways after dark.
Mitchell Gunn, used with perfmission

Sports Just Don’t Make Sense

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on November 29, 2015 in The Power of Prime
Sports just don’t make sense. They don’t always go the way we want them to. Sports can be so frustrating. To the point where it’s easy to wonder why we devote so much time and energy to it. Let’s look at why sports don’t make sense. Sports are complex. Sports are unpredictable and uncontrollable. Nothing comes quick and easy in sports. Progress isn’t steady.
common.wikimedia.org

Do Stronger Muscles Mean Better Brains?

It's not what you do with muscles - it's what you did to make them.

In Discussing "Youth," Jane Fonda Touches on "Superfluidity"

By Christopher Bergland on November 24, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Jane Fonda recently described the awe-inspiring aspects of having a peak experience while discussing her upcoming movie 'Youth.'

The Rise and Rapid Reduction of 'Rowdy' Ronda Rousey

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on November 24, 2015 in Black Belt Brain
Even though we enjoy watching the best athletes demonstrate their skills, we also like to see skillful, but super-confident athletes get beaten. Is it because we cannot identify with them?

Why Exercise Isn't Always a Panacea

Just because some exercise is great for us doesn’t mean these benefits extend indefinitely. It turns out that yes, you can exercise too much: Beyond a certain point of exertion, our bodies—and our minds—start to break down.

My First Marathon

By Charlotte N. Markey Ph.D. on November 19, 2015 in Smart People Don’t Diet
Want to run a marathon? Perseverance and luck may be all you need. For me, it was mostly about continuing to put one foot in front of the other and hoping for the best.

Three Brain Doctors Expose “Untold Story” in “Concussion"

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on November 17, 2015 in Brain Trauma
As audiences worldwide examine the film’s controversial CTE topic, Drs. Daniel G. Amen, Theodore Henderson and Harry Kerasidis, point to advanced treatments and tools available now to battle the brain injury epidemic.

How Athletes Can Address the Psychology of Injury

By Laura M Miele Ph.D. on November 17, 2015 in The Whole Athlete
What we can learn from Lamar Odom.
David Bruce

Letting Go of Fear of Failure-Part IV

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on November 17, 2015 in The Power of Prime
Fear of failure is about the perceptions that you hold about failure and, for the vast majority of people, those perceptions are entirely disconnected from the reality of their lives. You perceive that bad things will happen if you fail, but the reality is that nothing particularly bad, aside from some disappointment, will likely result from a failure.

Who Should Help Pay for Yoga?

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on November 17, 2015 in Urban Survival
Here are four reasons why health insurers should pay attention to yoga programs and help us pay for them.

Motivation Is Tied to the Strength of Your Brain Connections

By Christopher Bergland on November 16, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Would you identify yourself as someone who is highly motivated or more apathetic? Neuroscientists at Oxford University recently discovered a neurobiological mechanism that might explain why some of us are inherently more ambitious than others. The findings also explain the neuroscience of why "Just Do It" is such a motivational slogan.
Ed Bozman

The Real Fear in Fear of Failure: Part III

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on November 10, 2015 in The Power of Prime
The real fear is not failure, the meaning you attach to failure, or even total failure. Instead, the real fear of failure is about the fear of experiencing the painful emotions that young people think they will suffer if they fail.

"Superfluidity" and the "Hot Hand" Are Synonymous

By Christopher Bergland on November 10, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Recently, David Remnick wrote a brilliant article in the New Yorker, Bob Dylan and the “Hot Hand," which reminded me of concepts I’ve been trying to convey about the extraordinary—but also universal—experience of “superfluidity.” After reading Remnick's essay, it's clear to me that "the hot hand" and "superfluidity" occur both in sports and the creative process.

Why 'More Research Needed' May Be a Concussion Cop Out

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on November 06, 2015 in Brain Trauma
People may dismiss concussions as the great unknown, based how many times this phrase comes up. The fact is, we do know a lot, and need to leverage what we know into advanced tools, practical protocols and efforts for concussion management.