Essential Reads

Who Am I? Someone? Or Nobody?

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on August 24, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
Celebrity is competitive. The outrageously competitive have no limits on what they do to get noticed. Winning often means being a bigger jerk than anyone else is willing to be.

Blame It on Rio Part 1

The US swimming debacle in Rio, spearheaded by all-star Ryan Lochte, is a timeless story of Young Male Syndrome.

Olympics Bare Extreme Range of the Human Spirit

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on August 16, 2016 in Black Belt Brain
While we can aspire to Olympic ideals of decorum we often fail to adhere to their real life practice...a short coming not restricted to high performance athletes, of course.

When Sibling Rivalry Goes Awry

You may remember the days in the not so distant past when you were the envy of friends and family. “Your kids get along so well,” they would gush.

More Posts on Sport and Competition

Do Mean Girls Ever Grow Up?

The "mean girl" mother was in the PTA and prevented me from being a room mother and even lost some of my son's paper work for school. Her husband runs youth sports. This spring, her husband "lost" my youngest son's paperwork for summer baseball tryouts so he never got to try out for the "A" team.

Concussions are Brain Injuries

By Thomas Watanabe M.D. on July 19, 2011 in Impact to Aftermath
A video about symptoms of concussions.

You Don’t Like What You Ignore

By Art Markman Ph.D. on July 18, 2011 in Ulterior Motives
The world is a busy place. That means that you need to choose what you are going to look at. When you ignore something, that can affect how much you like it later.

Cognitive Biases v.s. Common Sense

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on July 18, 2011 in The Power of Prime
As the fields of psychology and behavioral economics have demonstrated, homo sapiens is a seemingly irrational species that appears to, more often than not, think and behave in nonsensical rather than commonsensical ways.

Mindfulness and Equality

By Susan L. Smalley Ph.D. on July 15, 2011 in Look Around and Look Within

Why Atheism Will Replace Religion: New Evidence

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on July 14, 2011 in The Human Beast
Atheists are heavily concentrated in economically developed countries, particularly the social democracies of Europe. In underdeveloped countries, there are virtually no atheists. Atheism is a peculiarly modern phenomenon. Why do modern conditions produce atheism? In a new study, I provide compelling evidence that atheism increases along with the quality of life.

Can Rest Improve Your Sports Performance?

Do body clocks, light, and sleep change sports performance? Yes - and it's true for virtually every kind of performance you can track.

Parenting: Set Your Children's "Defaults" Early

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on July 13, 2011 in The Power of Prime
You may be wondering what a computer default has to do with raising children. Well, in raising your children, whether you realize it or not, you’re creating a set of default options in just about every aspect of their lives.

Sex, Drugs & Education: The Spiritual Perspective

Sex and drugs divert people away from the true goal of what may be characterised as an essentially spiritual mission, the quest to discover and hold true to a deep-seated inner compass, a true-self or ‘soul', and to be guided in life by fellow-feeling, wisdom, compassion and love.

Common Sense Is Neither Common nor Sense

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on July 12, 2011 in The Power of Prime
If common sense was common, then most people wouldn't make the kinds of decisions they do every day. People wouldn't buy stuff they can't afford. They wouldn't smoke cigarettes or eat junk food. They wouldn't gamble. In other words, people wouldn't do the multitude of things that are clearly not good for them.
Risky Business: Why Teens Need Risk to Thrive and Grow

Risky Business: Why Teens Need Risk to Thrive and Grow

By Elizabeth Donovan M.A. on July 11, 2011 in Youth and Tell

Sex, Drugs, & Rock 'n Roll

By Walter E. Block Ph.D. on July 11, 2011 in Defending the Undefendable
O.J. Revisited: Those Who Don't Learn From the Past Are Doomed to Repeat It

O.J. Revisited: Those Who Don't Learn From the Past Are Doomed to Repeat It

By Stephen A. Diamond Ph.D. on July 07, 2011 in Evil Deeds
For criminal prosecutors, one of the biggest lessons from the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial back in 1995 should have been that, especially in circumstantial cases, psychology plays at least as powerful a part in jurors' decisions as so-called scientific evidence.

Education: Testing in Schools Isn't Working

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on July 07, 2011 in The Power of Prime
To all who believe that testing is the panacea for what ails public education in America today, it's time to wake up and smell the coffee.

When Competition Stifles Innovation

By Jonathan Fields on July 05, 2011 in Awake at the Wheel
Competition, it's said, is good. Especially for innovation. True, up to a point. But, there's a problem with leaning too heavily on competition as a core driver of innovation. Which is that you unwittingly risk capping your own willingness to birth genius at whatever level your closest competitor gives in at.

Psychology, Not Economics, is Behind Market Bubbles

By Ben Y Hayden Ph.D. on July 03, 2011 in The Decision Tree
To explain market bubbles, ditch the economics, pick up a psychology textbook.

O.J. Revisited: Will the Casey Anthony Jury Acquit If They Can't Make It Fit?

By Stephen A. Diamond Ph.D. on July 01, 2011 in Evil Deeds
"Those that fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it." For criminal prosecutors, one of the biggest lessons from the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial back in 1995 should have been that, especially in circumstantial cases, psychology plays at least as powerful a part in jurors' decisions as so-called scientific evidence.

Challenges of Traumatic Brain Injury Research

By Thomas Watanabe M.D. on June 30, 2011 in Impact to Aftermath

How to Keep Reality TV from Ruining Your Life

By Gretchen Rubin on June 30, 2011 in The Happiness Project
At lunch today, I was part of a spirited conversation on the pros and cons of reality TV. That's a broad category, of course, covering a wide range of shows from The Real Housewives to American Idol to Jersey Shore to Project Runway. My older daughter loves that show where they do fancy cake decorations -- what's it called?
Fiction as stealth persuasion

Fiction as stealth persuasion

By Julie Sedivy Ph.D. on June 26, 2011 in Sold on Language
The fictional words and actions of entirely made-up characters who have never drawn a breath in the real world can impact our attitudes and behavior more powerfully than the pleas or arguments of real flesh-and-blood people talking to us about real things in the actual world. Why should this be?