Essential Reads

Why Is Neuroticism So Toxic?

By Christopher Bergland on February 03, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroticism is widely considered the most toxic of the "Big Five" personality traits. Read this blog post for some easy tips on how-to become less neurotic.

The Replacement of Awe

By Andy Tix Ph.D. on February 03, 2016 in The Pursuit of Peace
Many of the most popular media events in history are similar in that they elicit a sense of awe. In doing this, they can replace sources that traditionally have inspired people.

College Athletes May Be More Depressed Than You Think

Similar to the compulsive exerciser whose tireless adherence to fitness most people admire, many college athletes may be struggling beneath a veneer of achievement.

FoMO Parenting: Nothing New

Parenting is stressful enough without FoMO Parenting. FoMO (Fear of Missing Out) isn't new. It’s just easier to see.

More Posts on Sport and Competition

Why Atheism Will Replace Religion: New Evidence

Atheists are heavily concentrated in economically developed countries, particularly the social democracies of Europe. In underdeveloped countries, there are virtually no atheists. Atheism is a peculiarly modern phenomenon. Why do modern conditions produce atheism? In a new study, I provide compelling evidence that atheism increases along with the quality of life.

Can Rest Improve Your Sports Performance?

Do body clocks, light, and sleep change sports performance? Yes - and it's true for virtually every kind of performance you can track.

Parenting: Set Your Children's "Defaults" Early

You may be wondering what a computer default has to do with raising children. Well, in raising your children, whether you realize it or not, you’re creating a set of default options in just about every aspect of their lives.

Sex, Drugs & Education: The Spiritual Perspective

Sex and drugs divert people away from the true goal of what may be characterised as an essentially spiritual mission, the quest to discover and hold true to a deep-seated inner compass, a true-self or ‘soul', and to be guided in life by fellow-feeling, wisdom, compassion and love.

Common Sense Is Neither Common nor Sense

If common sense was common, then most people wouldn't make the kinds of decisions they do every day. People wouldn't buy stuff they can't afford. They wouldn't smoke cigarettes or eat junk food. They wouldn't gamble. In other words, people wouldn't do the multitude of things that are clearly not good for them.

O.J. Revisited: Those Who Don't Learn From the Past Are Doomed to Repeat It

For criminal prosecutors, one of the biggest lessons from the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial back in 1995 should have been that, especially in circumstantial cases, psychology plays at least as powerful a part in jurors' decisions as so-called scientific evidence.

Education: Testing in Schools Isn't Working

To all who believe that testing is the panacea for what ails public education in America today, it's time to wake up and smell the coffee.

When Competition Stifles Innovation

Competition, it's said, is good. Especially for innovation. True, up to a point. But, there's a problem with leaning too heavily on competition as a core driver of innovation. Which is that you unwittingly risk capping your own willingness to birth genius at whatever level your closest competitor gives in at.

Psychology, Not Economics, is Behind Market Bubbles

To explain market bubbles, ditch the economics, pick up a psychology textbook.

O.J. Revisited: Will the Casey Anthony Jury Acquit If They Can't Make It Fit?

"Those that fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it." For criminal prosecutors, one of the biggest lessons from the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial back in 1995 should have been that, especially in circumstantial cases, psychology plays at least as powerful a part in jurors' decisions as so-called scientific evidence.

How to Keep Reality TV from Ruining Your Life

At lunch today, I was part of a spirited conversation on the pros and cons of reality TV. That's a broad category, of course, covering a wide range of shows from The Real Housewives to American Idol to Jersey Shore to Project Runway. My older daughter loves that show where they do fancy cake decorations -- what's it called?

Fiction as stealth persuasion

The fictional words and actions of entirely made-up characters who have never drawn a breath in the real world can impact our attitudes and behavior more powerfully than the pleas or arguments of real flesh-and-blood people talking to us about real things in the actual world. Why should this be?

On Innovation and Optimism

By Moses Ma on June 24, 2011 The Tao of Innovation
To succeed as an innovator, you must be indefatigably optimistic. This rule of thumb applies to the economy as well. Like what Economist Larry Summers said, "The central irony of financial crisis is that while it is caused by too much confidence, borrowing, lending and spending... it can only be resolved by increasing confidence, borrowing, lending and spending."

Through a Clinical Lens: Friday Night Lights

I'm a big fan of "Friday Night Lights." It's one of the things on television, and the best sports show since Aaron Sorkin's "Sports Night." Just thought that needed to be said. Speaking of thoughts, this past week's episode - Gut Check - engendered many thoughts about why therapists are valuable, and what they might do if they had been in the mix.