Essential Reads

Are You Tired of Being Judged?

We can't avoid being judged, but we can avoid letting others define us.

Tom Brady Broke the Rules, But Don't We All?

What "Deflategate" can teach us about human nature

Putting Music to the Words

Some species sing, some species call, but only humans do both

Recent Posts on Sport and Competition

The Importance of Failure: A Culture of False Success

It is becoming commonplace to give every child a trophy and generally dilute the competitive nature of sports. These changing trends are bringing new, long term challenges and repercussions that need to be taken note of. By fostering a false sense of success, we are ultimately doing a psychological disservice to children in more ways than one.

How Over-Thinking Kills Your Performance

By Gregory Ciotti on March 11, 2015 in Habits, Not Hacks
Why assessing your performance will often steer you wrong.

The Hard Problem of Life

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on March 11, 2015 in Hot Thought
Life and consciousness are problems allegedly so hard that no amount of scientific progress can ever solve them.

Is the Intense Pressure to Succeed Sabotaging Our Children?

Last week, a 13-year-old killed himself after receiving an email from his school that he was behind in his homework. What is the toll of putting so much academic and extracurricular pressure on children? What can parents, teachers, and policy makers do to break this vicious cycle and reduce the insanity of the K-12 rat race of trying to get into an A-list college?

Finding Meaning in Work

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 10, 2015 in The Prime of Life
How can we find significance and purpose in work in today's economy?

10 Ways to Spot an 'Everyday' Sadist

When we think of sadism, it’s often the “50 Shades of Grey” variety. However, sadism doesn’t just live in the bedroom. This 10-item quiz will help you find out who secretly harbors an unnatural desire to harm.

Barry Beck Finds His Purpose Bringing Hockey To China

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on March 10, 2015 in Brick by Brick
For the past 7 years, Barry Beck, a former NHL All-Star and capitan of the New York Rangers, has aimed to expand the sport of ice hockey. As a mentor and coach at the Hong Kong Academy of Ice Hockey, he has broken down barriers for the sport and developed a culture of growth and development for over 25,000 children.

Sports Are Like Sleep

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on March 09, 2015 in The Power of Prime
So, how are sports like sleep? You can’t TRY to play well. Forcing yourself to play well creates overthinking, muscle tension, and the attempt to control your body in the hopes that you can make your body play well. But, the harder you try to play well, the less likely you will play well. You want to allow great play to emerge naturally.

Which Is the More Narcissistic Sex?

We tend to associate the personality trait of narcissism with women who, at least in the popular sense, spend far more time and energy on their appearance than apparently do men. New research on sex differences shows clearly that there is a gender difference, but not in how we might expect.

How to Parent

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 06, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Parenting, then and now.

All About You - Quiz

By Alice Boyes Ph.D. on March 06, 2015 in In Practice
A little positive self-reflection can be a very nurturing thing to do. Here are some questions to stimulate your thinking. There are no right or wrong answers here. Take a little "me" time to think about what's important to you.

Negative Interest

By Ken Eisold Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in Hidden Motives
This is odd: “about $3 trillion of assets in Europe and Japan … now have negative interest rates.”

How Playing Baseball in Prison Can Help You Face Your Fears

By Jonathan Fader Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in The New You
Not many people like to socialize with some of the nation’s most notorious criminals. Even fewer challenge them to a competition.

Adulthood's Dirty Secret

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Social class' impact on education and family life.

The Big Mistakes of Religion and Secularism

People have a choice about religion and spirituality: to conform more or less rigidly to accepted teaching, or to think and act independently. Both bring problems, but the issues resolve spontaneously as we grow more mature and find a true set of values to follow

Who Says Wanting Control is a Bad Thing?

Yet, when it comes to our bodies, wanting to feel in charge is completely normal. But as we age it becomes less likely that we can control our bodies.

An Intelligence Officer's Explanation of the Islamic State

A simple way to understand the complex threat of ISIS

A Reflection on Extreme Prejudice and Violence

By Andy Tix Ph.D. on March 04, 2015 in The Pursuit of Peace
It is painful to passively accept the extreme prejudice and violence being reported across the world. Reflecting on these incidents can help to raise awareness of similar tendencies around and within all of us. What can we do locally and in ourselves to counter prejudice and violence, and promote more peaceful and effective relations, particularly across different groups?

Is True Friendship Still Possible?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 04, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Face-to-face conversations extending over decades is indeed evaporating.

Marketers' Shocking New Ability to Target Women

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in The Human Beast
During the fertile phase of their monthly cycle, women are prone to greater risk taking. For psychologists, this means that they are more likely to initiate sexual affairs. Marketers discovered that women are more likely to try new brands as well. Now they plan to use this fact in targeted marketing. Assuming that they get away with it, will the scheme work?

Colorblindness Is a Poor Adaptation to Neo-Diversity Anxiety

American racial, intergroup anxiety is getting worse. And one poor adaptation people are trying to use to avoid their own racial neo-diversity anxiety is the “I don’t see color” strategy.

You Can't Be Happy All of the Time, But Don't Stop Trying

By Frank T McAndrew Ph.D. on March 01, 2015 in Out of the Ooze
We work very hard to reach goals, anticipating the happiness that they will bring us. After a brief fix of “yippee," however, we quickly slide back to our sorry-ass, humdrum, ordinary state of being. Studies of lottery winners and others who seem to "have it all" throw cold water on our dream of a different life. And yet, we persist. Why?

Envy and Social Propinquity

Did you ever notice how you will envy those most like you in some important way? If you love chess you won't envy Yitzhak Perlman, just as if you play violin you won't envy Bobby Fisher. What is the deeper meaning beneath this phenomenon and how can it help us better understand those pangs of envy we sometimes feel?

Healthy Relationships Overlooked in Search for a Quick Fix

By Amy Banks on February 28, 2015 in Wired For Love
Simply thinking about your strongest relationships can change your brain chemistry in a positive way. Imagine the benefits of being face to face with the people you love!

ADHD and Early Death: A False Assumption

By Claudia M Gold M.D. on February 28, 2015 in Child in Mind
Space and time to listen to the story are critical to effective treatment of problems of regulation of attention, behavior and emotion. Perhaps the risk of early death in individuals diagnosed with ADHD lies in the absence of recognition and treatment of complex underlying causes.

What Sex Teaches Us About Leadership

Paying attention to sex can make you a better leader

Winning Moves in "Searching for Bobby Fischer"

By Skip Dine Young Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Movies and the Mind
"Searching for Bobby Fischer" is a movie about greatness in chess. But more than that, it is about maintaining compassion as one pursues excellence. It is also a caution to parents who may be tempted to overly identify with their children's success.

Living in the Here and Now

By Susan Hooper on February 26, 2015 in Detours and Tangents
For most of my life, I have wanted to be somewhere else, living an entirely different life. A calendar from years ago showed me that I had then—and may even have now—a life that other people might envy.

Study Finds Habits in Children Take Root by Age 9

By Rebecca Jackson on February 26, 2015 in School of Thought
The research is eye-opening for many parents who hope their children will eventually take on more responsibility. The evidence is clear; it's not happening without intervention. This article examines the new research and provides parents with an updated guide of age age appropriate responsibilities to build self-sufficiency and resilience in children.

Not Just High Achievers

By Hilary Levey Friedman Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Playing to Win
How can we understand the impressive performances on Child Genius? It's more than just brains, it's also achievement patterns.