Essential Reads

Trying to Explain the Inexplicable

By Gary Smith Ph.D. on September 23, 2016 in What the Luck?
We are tempted to look for psychological explanations for successes and failures, when the more convincing explanation is simply that people get lucky—and luck is fleeting.

View Concussion as a “Brain Sprain”

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on September 20, 2016 in Brain Trauma
Defining concussions gets a variety of answers, so neurologist Harry Kerasidis outlines the brain injury and symptoms, by comparing it to the common ankle sprain.

Why Louisiana Defendants Say, "Geaux Tigers!"

Two economists suggest a surprising source of racial bias in juvenile sentencing.

Who Am I? Someone? Or Nobody?

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on August 24, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
Celebrity is competitive. The outrageously competitive have no limits on what they do to get noticed. Winning often means being a bigger jerk than anyone else is willing to be.

More Posts on Sport and Competition

The Dark Side to the 2016 Olympics

By Azadeh Aalai Ph.D. on August 17, 2016 in The First Impression
Behind the pageantry, what are some of the hidden aspects to the Olympic games, and how do they trace back to the Nazi regime?

Are Olympians Addicted to Exercise, Work or Neither?

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on August 16, 2016 in In Excess
Olympic athletes are dedicated to their profession and spend hours every day training and exercising. But are Olympic athletes addicted to exercise, their work, or neither?

Your Child and Sports

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 16, 2016 in How To Do Life
What's a parent to do?

ADHD and Michael Phelps: Medication Is Not a Crutch

Not taking stimulant medication for your diagnosed ADHD? You still have ADHD.

Athletes and Performing Artists: They're All Around You

This is an exciting moment when organizations and structures are increasingly connecting the performance issues and mental skills of both athletes and performing artists.

No Shame: Why Michael Phelps Deserved to Carry the U.S. Flag

By Jason Powers M.D. on August 10, 2016 in Beyond Abstinence
Two years ago, the most decorated Olympian of all time was so mired in depression that he thought about killing himself. His comeback on dry land inspires me the most.

Olympics May Increase Child Prostitution in Rio

By Michael Ungar Ph.D. on August 10, 2016 in Nurturing Resilience
With the Olympics has come more child sexual exploitation. A new film, in development, is focusing attention on what happens to Brazil's child victims when they grow up.
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Watching Video Is Great Mental Training

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on August 10, 2016 in The Power of Prime
Watching videos of yourself and the best athletes in the world in your sport is a powerful tool for strengthening important mental muscles such as confidence, intensity, and focus.

America's Obsession With Winners and Losers

By Ray Williams on August 09, 2016 in Wired for Success
America has an obsession with defining success and happiness by winners and losers. This attitude and behavior permeates everything from sports to politics and business.

Inside the Mind of the Olympic Gold Medal Winner

Some involved in this research pointed out, amazingly, that their gold medal performance was not, in their view, the most outstanding moment in their career.

9 Ways to Convince (or Trick) Yourself to Start Working Out

By Joel Minden, PhD on August 03, 2016 in CBT and Me
If you're having trouble finding the time or energy to exercise, here are some practical strategies to increase exercise behavior and motivation.

3 Things You Can Learn About Yourself From the Way You Play

There's a relationship between the ways we resolve situations in the games we play, and how we deal with situations in real life.

Psychology, Learning, and the Serenity Prayer

Tolerate failure in order to succeed.This is true if you golf or play a sport, write, or pretty much do anything that requires learning and mastery. The Serenity Prayer says it all

Rugby Returns to the Games with New Concussion Risk, Respect

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on July 29, 2016 in Brain Trauma
America's fastest-growing sport, Rugby, returns to the Olympics, bringing inherent concussion risk along with a "healthy respect" for how the game handles concussions.

Better Mindsets, Better Results

Here are 4 mindset shifts that can help us win at life.

What Dale Earnhardt Jr. Can Teach Auto Accident Survivors

By James F. Zender Ph.D. on July 29, 2016 in The New Normal
Dale Earnhardt Jr. advances public awareness of concussions.

Your Eyes Are a Window Into the Inner Workings of Your Brain

William Shakespeare is credited with observing, "Eyes are the window to the soul." A new study goes one step farther by showing how your eyes are a window into your brain.

What Style of Yoga is Best for Your Health?

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on July 22, 2016 in Urban Survival
New study compares different styles of yoga to answer the question is one yoga style better than another. The answer will surprise you.
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For Athletic Success, You Pay Now or Pay Later

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on July 20, 2016 in The Power of Prime
You’re going to pay for what you do or do not do in your conditioning in one way or another. You can pay now with temporary fatigue and pain or you can pay later in lasting regret.

Play Foul and Fair

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on July 14, 2016 in Play in Mind
Rule breakers come in three varieties: the cheater, the spoilsport, and the game changer. We despise the first, we puzzle over the second, and usually, we admire the third.

Is Pokémon GO a Virtual Drug?

Is Pokémon GO a revolution or passing fad? Does its form of augmented reality offer new opportunity for therapeutic benefits or are risks like addiction and recklessness too great?

Want to Build Strength and Gain Muscle? Lift Lighter Weights

If you want to gain physical strength and build muscle—lifting lighter weights can be just as effective as lifting heavy weights, according to a new study.
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Strengthen Your Confidence Muscle Like a Champion

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on July 11, 2016 in The Power of Prime
Confidence is the most important mental muscle because you may have all of the ability to perform your best, if you don’t believe in that ability, you won’t use that ability.

Who's More Likely to Try to Cheat Their Way to the Top?

The dark side of getting ahead involves cheating and sabotaging others. Lab research comparing the two sexes finds the dark side is more likely to be inhabited by men.

One Motivational Technique Really Works (And It's Easy!)

A massive new study has pinpointed the most effective motivational technique for improving performance—and it’s incredibly easy.

Superfluidity: The Science and Psychology of Optimizing Flow

Have you ever had a 'flow' experience that felt as if you were "standing outside yourself"? The science and psychology of 'superfluidity' help to explain the highest tier of flow.

No More Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polkadot Bikinis

Why one group of teens won't be wearing any teenie weenie bikinis this year

Tourist Psychology

By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on June 26, 2016 in A Swim in Denial
In the prison of habit the tourist dreams of mind-blowing abandon

The Power of Imagery

By Clifford N Lazarus Ph.D. on June 25, 2016 in Think Well
While the power of positive thinking is great, the power of positive imagery is often greater. Here are two of the most effective visualization techniques.
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How Athletes Can Take Risks That Pay Off

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on June 22, 2016 in The Power of Prime
It never feels like the right time to take risks in sports because there are risks to taking risks, primarily that of failure. Yet, only by taking risks can athletes find success.