Sport and Competition Essential Reads

Modern Hunter-Gatherers Show We Evolved to Stay Active

By Christopher Bergland on November 29, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
New research on the lifestyle habits of a rare population of hunter-gatherers reaffirms the universal health benefits of staying physically active.

Love and Sports

By Michael W. Austin Ph.D. on November 21, 2016 in Ethics for Everyone
If it is intentionally cultivated, the virtue of love can flourish in athletic contexts.

Daily Physical Activity Boosts Brain Power and Self-Control

By Christopher Bergland on November 14, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Physical activity has the power to boost your brain power and increase your self-control, according to a new study.

Study Identifies No. 1 Source of Motivation to Exercise More

By Christopher Bergland on October 30, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study identifies a simple and effective source of motivation that can inspire you to become more physically active.

Can Artificial Intelligence Make Us Happy?

Does AI spell the doom of humankind? Or should we welcome it? Given the significant limitations of human rationality, only AI can help humans to solve many difficult problems.

The Neuroscience of Finger Length Ratio and Athletic Prowess

By Christopher Bergland on October 14, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have found a correlation between finger length ratios and brain function. A new study reports that having a shorter index finger may indicate athletic potential.

In Defense of the Value of Football

Despite the recent fears of CTE, football remains a valuable tool for developing youth.

A Fundamental Source of Error in Human Judgment

By Gary Smith Ph.D. on October 07, 2016 in What the Luck?
We encounter it almost every day, yet almost nobody understands it.

Irisin: The "Exercise Hormone" Is a Fat-Fighting Phenomenon

By Christopher Bergland on October 05, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study reports that the exercise-induced hormone irisin can reduce the number of mature fat cells by 20 to 60 percent. If you want to lose weight, irisin production can help.

10 Tips for Friendly Political Discussions

Although some of us like to “root for the underdogs,” most of us still want to be on the winning team. How do you discuss politics with friends who pull for the "other" team?
Labelled for reuse; https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7589775

Goals Are Not What You Think!

By Tim Carey Ph.D. on October 02, 2016 in In Control
Goals are always about the outcome or result of particular behaviours, not about the actions that bring those results into being.

Trying to Explain the Inexplicable

By Gary Smith Ph.D. on September 23, 2016 in What the Luck?
We are tempted to look for psychological explanations for successes and failures, when the more convincing explanation is simply that people get lucky—and luck is fleeting.

View Concussion as a “Brain Sprain”

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on September 20, 2016 in Brain Trauma
Defining concussions gets a variety of answers, so neurologist Harry Kerasidis outlines the brain injury and symptoms, by comparing it to the common ankle sprain.

Why Louisiana Defendants Say, "Geaux Tigers!"

Two economists suggest a surprising source of racial bias in juvenile sentencing.

Who Am I? Someone? Or Nobody?

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on August 24, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
Celebrity is competitive. The outrageously competitive have no limits on what they do to get noticed. Winning often means being a bigger jerk than anyone else is willing to be.

Blame It on Rio Part 1

The US swimming debacle in Rio, spearheaded by all-star Ryan Lochte, is a timeless story of Young Male Syndrome.

Olympics Bare Extreme Range of the Human Spirit

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on August 16, 2016 in Black Belt Brain
While we can aspire to Olympic ideals of decorum we often fail to adhere to their real life practice...a short coming not restricted to high performance athletes, of course.

When Sibling Rivalry Goes Awry

You may remember the days in the not so distant past when you were the envy of friends and family. “Your kids get along so well,” they would gush.

Michael Phelps’ Heroic Journey Goes Far Beyond Gold Medals

By Christopher Bergland on August 15, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Michael Phelps is the most-decorated Olympian of all time. He's also a role model for sharing intimate details of how he completed the hero's journey after hitting rock bottom.

#PhelpsFace and the Neuroscience of Getting “in the Zone”

By Jordan Gaines Lewis, Ph.D. on August 11, 2016 in Brain Babble
What explains the swimmer's snarling face toward Chad le Clos before Monday's 200m butterfly?

The Struggle and the Triumph of the Olympics

One reason we love the Olympics is that we want to see others achieve incredible things, even through seemingly insurmountable challenges.

Study: The Male Warrior Hypothesis May Be Real

By Christopher Bergland on August 05, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Why are male athletes more likely to be touchy-feely after a sports competition than their female counterparts? A new study from Harvard University offers some interesting clues.

Yes, You Can Do It! Self-Control May Be an Infinite Resource

Researchers are beginning to question the notion that self-control is a depletable resource. This is good news for anyone looking for inspiration and motivation to seize the day.

Kids’ Sports as a Window Into Human Nature

The dark side of kids’ sports is as dark as human nature gets. Evolutionary psychology can explain why.

Storming on Bastille Day

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on July 25, 2016 in Play in Mind
Sometimes, we learn most when things go haywire.

Epigenetic Mechanism in the Cerebellum Drives Motor Learning

New research pinpoints how we learn new motor skills such as riding a bicycle, playing the piano, driving a car, etc.

Acceptance and Transformation

Should left-handers demand that half the baseball diamond be reversed?

Skilled Performance Takes More Than Practice

By Art Markman Ph.D. on June 23, 2016 in Ulterior Motives
There has been a big debate in psychology about whether elite performance reflects talents or skills. A new meta-analysis helps to resolve this question.

The Naturalistic Fallacy Fallacy (Part I)

While it's true that "is doesn't imply ought," it's dangerous and stupid to ignore human nature.

14 Career Options for Psychology Majors

By Vineel Maharaj on June 13, 2016 in Beyond the Psychology Major
There are thousands of psychology-related jobs everywhere, but these are the most common positions companies look for.