Sport and Competition Essential Reads

The Adjustment of Adoptees

By A Guest Blogger on March 31, 2015 in Brainstorm
Does the emotional, behavioral and academic adjustment of adopted children differ from that of non-adopted children? New research sheds light on the differences—and similarities—between both groups.

The Shot Clock and the Body Clock

By Alex Korb Ph.D. on March 27, 2015 in PreFrontal Nudity
During March Madness most people overlook important aspects of neuroscience that contribute to peak athletic performance.

March Madness

By Jeffrey Lieberman M.D. on March 24, 2015 in Shrink Speak
Students and parents rarely consider that they might need mental health services during college and often urgently. For this reason, they would be well advised to include the quality and availability of mental health services along with traditional considerations as they decide on the college of their choice.

The Bourgeois Revolution

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 23, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Many of our most powerful fantasies and expectations about marriage and family life emerged two centuries ago.

Does Creativity have its Dark Side?

We are used to thinking of creativity as an entirely positive attribute. However, new research on malevolent creativity suggests that the truly creative may put their novel thinking to dangerous uses under the right circumstances.

Yes, You Should Get Paid to Watch Basketball at Work

By Ron Friedman Ph.D. on March 19, 2015 in Glue
Think watching basketball on the job is a waste of company time? Think again.

Do Dog People and Cat People Differ in Terms of Dominance?

New data suggest that dog people and cat people are selecting their preferred pet because it complements their own personality.

Science and the Online Dating Profile

Online dating is the new singles bar, one in which your words won't be drowned out by the music. But which words should you use? There is some scientific evidence about relatively more effective ways to turn an online contact into a real huggable moment.

Women Like Men With Big Medals

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on March 15, 2015 in Caveman Politics
If our basic drive is to survive and reproduce, why do men, who have been the primary war fighters throughout human history, volunteer to subject themselves to the life-threatening dangers of war?

The 'Other' Marshmallow Test

The tower building exercise - and its marshmallow - reveals another secret of successful human behavior, in this case for mental health professionals: when we put the goals of our patients first and foremost, they are going to be more effective, and so will we.

Is True Friendship Still Possible?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 04, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Face-to-face conversations extending over decades is indeed evaporating.

Marketers' Shocking New Ability to Target Women

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in The Human Beast
During the fertile phase of their monthly cycle, women are prone to greater risk taking. For psychologists, this means that they are more likely to initiate sexual affairs. Marketers discovered that women are more likely to try new brands as well. Now they plan to use this fact in targeted marketing. Assuming that they get away with it, will the scheme work?

Living in the Here and Now

By Susan Hooper on February 26, 2015 in Detours and Tangents
For most of my life, I have wanted to be somewhere else, living an entirely different life. A calendar from years ago showed me that I had then—and may even have now—a life that other people might envy.

Red vs. Blue: Which Should You Choose?

By Jamie Madigan Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Mind Games
Has anyone ever done research on whether playing on the red team or the blue gives one a mental edge in games? Yep.

Traveling Through Time

By Dr. Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Trouble in Mind
Our ability to mentally travel back and forward in time gives us our sense of self and enhances our lives and coping abilities in many ways.

Generations Divided

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on February 21, 2015 in The Prime of Life
We live in a society acutely conscious of age. Ours is also an intensely age segregated society that denigrates whole groups of people based on their age.

Pressure at the Academy Awards

By Hendrie Weisinger on February 18, 2015 in Thicken Your Skin
Most people perform below their capability in a pressure moment.

What Is Mindfulness and How Does It Work?

By Gregg Henriques on February 06, 2015 in Theory of Knowledge
Mindfulness is one of the most important developments in mental health in the past twenty years. Understand what it is and how it works.

Calmfidence: The Secret to True Resilience

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on February 02, 2015 in Ambigamy
Make the best of your worst-case scenarios.

NFL Message: Just Go Punch Someone

By Stanton Peele on February 02, 2015 in Addiction in Society
The NFL wants players to eschew unjustified, irrational, emotionally-driven violence—except if they feel like hitting people.

Superstitions and the Super Bowl

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on January 28, 2015 in Mental Mishaps
Put on your team jersey and don your special hat. Make sure you have the right chips and dips. Are your friends ready? Will everyone be in the correct seat on the couch drinking the exact right beverage? Your team is depending on you. You’ve got to help them win. If you get any of this wrong, your team will lose and it will be your fault.

There's More to Yoga Than a Yoga Butt

The mental rewards of meditation.

17 Rules to Guide You Through Any Conflict

Whether in your relationships or your work life, it’s inevitable that you’ll be involved in a conflict with someone over something. These 17 principles will guide you in learning how best to put your emotions, motives, and communication skills to settle any of those conflicts in to produce successful results.

How to Have a Well-Behaved Child, Part 3

By Kenneth Barish Ph.D. on January 19, 2015 in Pride and Joy
Self-regulation, especially in childhood, is not learned well from consequences or punishment. The threat of punishment has its place, but it is a small part of learning discipline and self-control.

Charles Darwin's Daily Walks

What Charles Darwin's daily walk did for his mind

How to Win

Smart effort is a good thing. It might well win Urban Meyer another national championship. But he learned the hard way that bottomless, pull-your-hair-out effort produces more stress than success.

There Is Nothing Either Good or Bad But Thinking Makes It So

Lack of empathy is the black hole in our social relations.

In Tragedy, Putting Sports in Perspective

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on January 07, 2015 in The Power of Prime
When young people lose their lives in sports, it is a bracing slap in the face about why we are involved in sports and a reminder about what is really important (and it’s not the results!). Let’s honor them by keeping sports in perspective as a marvelous part of life, but not life itself.

Why You and Your Siblings May Still Be Rivals

No matter how much siblings love each other, they’re bound to have their share of conflict, often over the attention of their parents. Whether you’re a sibling, or a parent of one, you know that sibling rivalry is real. Here are some insights to help you understand where it comes from and what the effects of parental favoritism can be over time.

7 Things We Just Learned About Human Nature

By Matthew Hutson on January 01, 2015 in Psyched!
Uri Gneezy and John List are known for their field experiments, testing hypotheses in the real world.