Essential Reads

Mike Mozart, used under Creative Commons License

The Downside of Having Nothing to Hide

By David Berreby on October 19, 2016 in The Outsourced Mind
Soon, we'll all know a lot more about each other's motives, in real time. And it won't be pretty.

5 Ways Our Body Language Speaks Loud and Clear

We constantly send out signals through our nonverbal communication, often without realizing it. A new study shows how these can impact our success at work.

Why Clowns Creep Us Out

By Frank T. McAndrew Ph.D. on October 14, 2016 in Out of the Ooze
Clowns are mischievous and unpredictable, and they have an association with serial killers in real life and in the movies. In other words, clowns are designed to creep us out.

In Defense of the Value of Football

Despite the recent fears of CTE, football remains a valuable tool for developing youth.

More Posts on Social Life

Fotolia, with permission

The Day After the Election, Will We Still Be Friends?

By Allison Carmen on October 23, 2016 in The Gift of Maybe
Many of us have people in our lives that we have argued with or may not be speaking to because of the presidential election. How can we repair these relationships and begin again?

Three Cheers for Methodological Terrorists

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on October 21, 2016 in Rabble Rouser
A political scientist argues that statistical and methodological criticism is central to improving psychological research, and that stigmatizing such critiques is deeply misguided.
J. Krueger

Why Teach More?

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on October 20, 2016 in One Among Many
Professors teach because they love it (and make a living). Therefore, they will teach more when the opportunity arises, no?

How Should Our Diet Change as We Age? (Part 2)

Is there a special diet that will extend our lives?

A Wine-y Time of Year

Wine is a delicious and pleasing quaff on a fall day, the season of the grape harvest or crush. But what are the health benefits or detriments?

Counter Work Behaviors

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on October 18, 2016 in A Sideways View
Bosses are really worried about bad behavior at work like theft, bullying etc. But why do employees sometimes misbehave?

Pre-Suasion: Before You Try to Persuade Someone…

In Pre-Suasion, Robert Cialdini asks: What is most important if you want to persuade? Hint: it’s not so much what’s IN your message, as in what happens in the moment just BEFORE.

What Can Secrets and Confessions Reveal?

By Diana Raab Ph.D. on October 17, 2016 in The Empowerment Diary
Most of us have secrets and/or confessions to reveal. Sharing with a therapist, friend, or a journal can be cathartic. Choosing the right recipient of the secret is important.

Nietzsche vs. the Batek

Could Nietzsche’s 'Superman' survive in a traditional human society?
Budgerigar_Norway_-01, Labelled for Reuse, Wikimedia Commons

Getting What You Want

By Tim Carey Ph.D. on October 13, 2016 in In Control
We are all wanters. Every one of us wants lots of different things all day, every day.

What Is Wrong With Social Psychological Science?

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on October 13, 2016 in Rabble Rouser
The dysfunctions in psychological science go way beyond replication

Five Tech-Steps to a Meaningful Relationship

If you’re searching for love and a long-term relationship, locating the right partner can be tough. It’s just incredibly difficult to find a great match.

From “My Bad” to “I'm Sorry": Trump's Evolving Apology

Trump has apologized . . . sort of. He said the words, more than once, yet many voters are unconvinced. Why? We forgive (and often forget), when apologies are authentic.

Can a Reality TV Script Work for a Presidential Campaign?

What Mr. Trump’s unwavering supporters teach us about authenticity in today's culture and its future.

People Who Interview Well

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on October 12, 2016 in A Sideways View
Are some people massively advantaged by the interview process and others seriously disadvantaged? Does this make it a poor selection device and if so, when and why?

The Halloween Costume as a Tool for Personal Growth

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on October 12, 2016 in How To Do Life
Trying on personas can be instructive and fun.

How Is Incivility Related to Scientific Integrity?

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on October 11, 2016 in Rabble Rouser
Psychological science is in distress. Studies fail to replicate at what some consider an alarming rate. Its statistics and methods are a mess. And its scientists behave badly.

Four Types of Commitment in Polyamorous Relationships

This blog looks at four ways polyamorists express their commitments to each other verbally, with fluid bonding, via Google calendar, and with ceremonies.

Tips for Making Friends When You're Depressed

Admittedly, it’s tough to make friends when you’re feeling depressed. Here are some tips that might help

Can Society Exist Without Authoritarianism?

By Michael Aaron, Ph.D. on October 07, 2016 in Standard Deviations
Despite much social progress, authoritarianism continues to exist. Studies show authoritarian traits are common. We must ask ourselves "Can society exist without authoritarianism?"

The Man Who Could See the Invisible

Thinking about Hurricane Matthew and its possible effects

Rome, Georgia: The Small Town Capital of Nice

Rome, Georgia is located in the heart of the South, and won me over with its friendliness. Here's an interview with the Mayor and Police Chief on community, division, and policing

Is Polyamory a Form of Sexual Orientation?

Polyamory may be a sexual orientation, both in a legal and personal sense.

Elder Orphans: A Real Problem or a New Way to Scare Singles?

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on October 04, 2016 in Living Single
Elder orphans: a serious concern, a scare story to put uppity singles in their place, and a term that should be put to rest

How to Avoid Attending Someone Else's Pity Party

Refusing to participate could be the kindest, most compassionate thing you could do.

Is It Time to Retire ADHD?

For many Americans heroin addiction begins with the abuse of legally prescribed medications. Most often this involves painkillers, but sometimes trouble begins with ADHD drugs.

Trump Is Only the Symptom

By Guy P. Harrison on October 02, 2016 in About Thinking
Donald Trump is not the problem. He's a symptom of the problem.

You Can Be Fired for Wearing Dreadlocks

A federal court and court of appeals held that an Alabama company had the right to rescind its offer of employment to an African American woman who insisted on wearing dreadlocks.

Staying Physically Active Promotes Self-Reliance as You Age

By Christopher Bergland on September 30, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study from Yale University reports that staying moderately physically active is key to maintaining mobility and a state of independence as people get older.

How to Communicate in a World of Spin

By Steve Sisgold on September 30, 2016 in Life in a Body
This virus of falseness is only getting worse and no one, it seems, is spared the plague of this spin.