Essential Reads

Who's Harder to Buy Gifts for, Men or Women? It Depends!

Who’s harder to buy gifts for, men or women? It depends on who’s doing the giving!

The Psychosocial Risks of Social Media and the Internet

By Jean Kim M.D. on March 21, 2017 in Culture Shrink
We need to remain vigilant about the risks of social media's influence on our society and human behaviors.

Predators Prey on Politeness: 5 Spring Break Travel Tips

Think you can spot a predator while traveling? Here are 5 tips to make sure you can. Take these precautions to ensure that your Spring Break travel is both satisfying and safe.

Social Norms, Moral Judgments, and Irrational Parenting

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on March 19, 2017 in Freedom to Learn
We are all conformists; it’s part of human nature. But sometimes our conformist nature leads us to do things that are downright silly or, worse, tragic.

More Posts on Social Life

“I’d Rather Not Be a Recluse”

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on March 23, 2017 in How To Do Life
The latest in a series of profiles on reclusive people.

Why are Some Women Still Afraid to Speak Up?

Observing the behavior of women in groups suggests that women still choose a particular mask to wear depending on the audience.

Why Do Some Men Get Premature Championship Tattoos?

By Kevin Bennett on March 22, 2017 in Modern Minds
Why do some men get premature championship tattoos? Here are four reasons why you might go for some skin art that predicts a successful season for your favorite team.

We Are All Mojo Junkies

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on March 21, 2017 in Ambigamy
We all gravitate toward self-revitalizing signs of hope, and in the process, we generate social and interpersonal congestion.

You Are What You Think

Ways to change common negative thoughts and make positive life changes.

Predatory Polyamory?

My first blog on this topic told monogamous folks that they did not need to worry about poly people trying to steal their partners, but readers wrote in telling a different story.

Looking for Love?

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on March 16, 2017 in Cravings
Where do people look for love and friendship? And where do they actually find it?

Too Many Questions!

How do you handle a friend who asks too many questions…to the extent that you feel like you’re being interrogated?

Harvard Study Finds Genetic ‘Toggle Switch’ for Sociability

Researchers at Harvard Medical School have pinpointed specific neuronal circuitry and a 'toggle switch' that can turn a mouse's sociability "on" and "off" in the laboratory.

Climate Change: How to Prevent Workplace Harassment

The workplace is our home away from home; let´s work together to keep it predator-free. Here are some methods of preventing sexual harassment from becoming sexual assault.

The Control Freak

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on March 15, 2017 in A Sideways View
Why do some people need to exercise constant and control of their own lives and others around them? Are they really freaks or is this need both relatively common and even adaptive?

Sexual Harassment Is in the Eye of the Beholder

Sexual Harassment: Do you know it when you see it? Many people don´t--including the perpetrators.

Empathy: There’s an App For That!

By Sara Konrath Ph.D. on March 14, 2017 in The Empathy Gap
The science behind using mobile phones for good

Can a Friendship Survive Major Political Disagreement?

Can friends stay friends when they disagree about politics? Here's how strategies like self-determination, curiosity, and respect can help you keep your friendships intact.

Avoiding "Fatal Attractions" in Intimate Relationships

Finding the right partner can be challenging. Picking one who will not annoy you or turn you off in the long run can be even harder. Fortunately, research can help...

Male Body Image and Neckties: What's the Relationship?

What a man's necktie says about his personality may not be exactly what you'd expect. Research on the male body image sheds light on this part of a man's clothing selections.

Avoid the Ad Hominem Attack

Arguments on all kinds of topics, between all kinds of people, are everywhere these days. In such a climate, we would be wise to avoid the ad hominem attack.

Can Modern People Survive in the Wild?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on March 09, 2017 in The Human Beast
The history of European explorers contains nasty stories of intelligent people failing to adapt to harsh new environments. One exception may be Viking colony in Greenland.

11 Surprising Things Good Friendships Do for You

By Andrea Bonior Ph.D. on March 08, 2017 in Friendship 2.0
Do you tend to think of your social life as a luxury to be pushed aside when things get busy? You might want to treat it like a crucial health issue. Read on for why.

Avoidant Personality Disorder

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on March 08, 2017 in A Sideways View
How can you best help and understand those with Avoidant Personality Disorder?

Do Dogs Ever Lie to or Try to Deceive People?

New data shows that dogs are capable of being deceptive around people when it is in their own self-interest.

What’s the Matter with Empathy?

By Sara Konrath Ph.D. on March 07, 2017 in The Empathy Gap
At a time when “empathy” is more controversial than ever, a researcher explains what it is, what it isn’t, and when it fosters kindness and compassion.

“I Have Feelings for You,” Its Eight Different Meanings

Virtually all of us would agree that such an emotional declaration as “I have feelings for you” implies fervid feelings of hopeful love. Unless, that is, it doesn’t.

Why We Love Talking About Ourselves

People love to talk, talk, talk.

It's Time to Thank Your Partner for Doing Their "Job"

By Amie M. Gordon PhD on March 06, 2017 in Between You and Me
When household duties become "jobs," gratitude diminishes and resentment grows. But research suggests a little appreciation may transform these tasks from "musts" to "wants."

A Parent’s Guide to Surviving Spring Break

By Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D. on March 05, 2017 in Social Lights
12 suggestions from a college professor

Social Psychology of Democracy, Wisdom

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on March 03, 2017 in Rabble Rouser
What makes for a strong democracy? The Founders (and a few others) weigh in, with some surprising insights.

Hygge Is Here—and That’s a Good Thing

Make your life better, with hygge!

Selling Mental Illness and Its Cure

By Stanton Peele on March 02, 2017 in Addiction in Society
Kay Jamison's presentation of her biography of poet Robert Lowell, "Setting the River on Fire," shortchanged his lived experience and creativity in favor of his mental illness.

Taking a Facebook Sabbatical

Tired of Facebook? Newsfeeds got you down? Take a hiatus and see what happens. One millennial psychologist did just this and lived to tell the tale.