Essential Reads

The No-Vacation Nation

How Going on Holiday May Just Save Our Minds and Our Economy.

3 Reasons Not to Spend Your Money on Things

Science says buying new shoes won't make you happier, but a dinner out might

The Truth Behind Your Rainbow Profile Picture

Psychological research with your profile pic analyzes more than you think.

Sober Summer!

A survival guide

Recent Posts on Social Life

The Sexism in Science Controversies

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on July 02, 2015 in Rabble Rouser
Are scientific claims of sexism in science overstated?

The No-Vacation Nation

By Shimi Kang M.D. on July 01, 2015 in The Dolphin Way
Who killed summer vacation? That’s the million dollar question - literally. We’ve all seen it. Most of us have even been this person at one point or another: You know, the one who sits poolside at a resort glued to their smartphone or laptop, and whose entire holiday itinerary revolves around whether or not WiFi will be readily available.

Self/Other-Help

As we are developing the irrelationship theory, model, and recovery process, we see it as our most primary of tasks to be inclusive of the experience of our readers, clients and colleagues. We are committed to building this model in a way that is in synch with our recover model: in a collaborative reciprocity with those for whom these ideas are resonating.

Is the Modern World More Violent?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in The Human Beast
If it bleeds, it leads is a truism of news coverage. We all sympathize with the victims of senseless violence, and their families, because we know that it could have been us, and our families. Yet, our world has never been less violent – except in news media and entertainment.

4 Things You Should Never Do During an Argument

By Amie M. Gordon PhD on June 30, 2015 in Between You and Me
The last time you got into a fight, how did you act? Did you criticize or roll your eyes as you sat in stony silence? Did you get defensive? Or maybe you were able to joke around and lighten the mood. Although everyone fights, people differ in how they deal with conflict. And it turns out that how we deal with conflict says a lot about the future of our relationships.

3 Reasons Not to Spend Your Money on Things

By Amie M. Gordon PhD on June 30, 2015 in Between You and Me
The other weekend I went to the mall in search of new running shoes. When I arrived, the parking lot was so full that I had to circle around before I found a spot. The stores were equally crowded inside. Apparently none of these shoppers had read Leaf Van Boven's 2005 review article highlighting the benefits of spending money on experiences over material goods.

The Truth Behind Your Rainbow Profile Picture

By Andrea Bonior Ph.D. on June 29, 2015 in Friendship 2.0
In a spontaneous and beautiful display of support, many people rainbow-tinted their profile pics to celebrate marriage equality. What many did not know was how much cold, hard data analysis goes on about their decision to do so.

Sober Summer!

For those trying to cut back on their drinking or for sober alcoholics, the summertime and the many celebrations that accompany it can be temptations.Many will report that the warm weather, the outdoor bars, family gatherings, vacations, the beach, sporting events, etc. can bring back memories of “the good ole’ days”. Here are some tips for sober summertime fun!

Does Everyone Seem Clique-y? the Problem May Be You

By Andrea Bonior Ph.D. on June 28, 2015 in Friendship 2.0
Entering any group as an outsider can be difficult. Often, we sabatoge ourselves by assuming that others are snobby or exclusive, when in reality they just already know each other-- and that's what makes us uncomfortable.

The Real Problem With Work

By Ken Eisold Ph.D. on June 28, 2015 in Hidden Motives
Men and women suffer from the same problem on the job: too much work

Regional Differences in Personality: Surprising Findings

Individual personality traits and the geographic region where one lives are correlated with important social outcomes. Research has found that personality traits are also geographically clustered in ways correlated with these same outcomes. Some of the results are surprising as the individual level and societal level correlates of personality can differ strikingly.

10 Odd Emotions You May (or May Not) Have Experienced

Have you ever felt that you were out of place? Or,a sense of sadness that you will never know what will happen to your great-great-grandchildren? How many of these strange feelings have you have experienced?

Born in the USA

When the 4th of July comes around, do you find yourself getting all patriotic? That’s OK – it’s part of our evolved coalitional psychology. Read on to find out why!

Aztec Marriage: A Lesson for Chief Justice Roberts

No, the Supreme Court did not overthrow Aztec marriage today. When claims that marriage has been a single "social institution" that formed the basis for human society get strange...

An Overlooked Reason To Commit

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on June 26, 2015 in Ambigamy
You can't tell what a compromise will cost until you commit to it and start figuring out how to make it cost less.

Why Does Racism Persist? Update

What is racism's immortal head? Why does racism persist?

The Non-Committal RSVP

Are you having trouble getting people to commit to showing up? I’m impressed with the two convicted convicts who escaped from a NY prison. I know they are horrible and dangerous. Still, I admire their ability to get a plan together and stick with it. Obviously, they are not from LA.

A 20-Second Experiment in Racial Stereotypes

A 20-second demonstration of where stereotypes come from. Knowledge is power.

The Psychology of Competition

Competitions are fun, let’s be honest. At one point or another, you probably have enjoyed being part of some kind of competition. Of course, competitions are more fun if you actually “win” (but for you to win, someone else must lose). Given this basic inequality: can competitions promote pro-social behavior?

Should I Send My Ex-friend a Birthday Card?

My best friend's birthday is approaching and I wanted to know if I should still wish her a happy birthday even though we’re not speaking.

Does Love Change Your Brain?

Falling in love may be more than just an emotional experience; it might alter your brain chemistry.

Want to Make More Friends? Get a Dog

New data confirms that walking your dog makes it more likely that you will know your neighborhood and form friendships in your community.

Reflections on Pixar's "Inside-Out" and the Neglect of Shame

Distinguishing whether you are depressed because you have experienced a prolonged state of sadness, or because you have experienced a prolonged state of shame, is critically important.

9 Ways to Handle Nosy People

Some questions are just too personal, but you’re worried that if you don’t answer them, you’ll seem rude. These 9 tips will give you a graceful way to duck the question and help you protect you from future, similar, assaults on your privacy. You'll also gain important insight into yourself and your sensitivities in the process.

Love for a Killer: "A Very Evil Kid”

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on June 22, 2015 in Moral Landscapes
When Adam Lanza massacred school children, people asked about his genes. But that was the wrong question. Genes are inert without experience. Families of victims of Dylann Roof’s gun rampage forgave him. It’s a show of love that he probably needed much earlier in his life.

Ignorance About Race Is Killing Us

If we don’t seriously engage the problem underlying Race in the USA, more people will die and many more will continue to suffer

Corrosive Communication

Sticks and stones, who believes it? Words can hurt. Here’s a look at sarcasm and the accusation of defensiveness.

Every Relationship Has Rules. Do You Follow Yours?

Whether they realize it or not, couples have rules that help keep their relationship going. From mundane household chores to the guiding principles behind deeper issues of fidelity, honesty, communication and support, it’s important to take stock of the ones that guide you and your partner.

How Phones Are Tearing Us Apart

By Guest Blogger on June 19, 2015 in Brainstorm
Research suggests that smartphones may decrease our trust in one another, lower the quality of our relationships, and degrade the quality of our conversations.

The Simple Solution to Income Inequality

By Ken Eisold Ph.D. on June 18, 2015 in Hidden Motives
It is a no-brainer, basically: a progressive rate in income taxes, along with estate taxes that target the super wealthy.