Essential Reads

5 Ways to Heal a Broken Heart

Simple steps to get to a better place.

3 Tips for Seeking Compassion When Emotionally Distressed

Why prior experience does not always lead to empathy

Meaningfully Salient Parenting

For the child to become whole, he or she must have a model who is whole.

5 Reasons That Life Is Hard

Evolutionary Psychology and Everyday Life

Recent Posts on Resilience

5 Ways to Heal a Broken Heart

How do you recover from one of the most painful life experiences?

Get Out Of Your Toxic Relationship By Taking These 3 Steps!

Toxic relationships are not good for you. They can break down your emotional health. Here are three steps to get yourself out of your toxic relationship!

Routine, Grit, and Vision

Establishing simple, repeatable, and mundane routines set you up for a life of adventure in everything. Small steps, big rewards.

Lovely Me

Amy loses weight by squarely facing her emotional eating patterns and envisions living the life in the body of her choice.

3 Tips for Seeking Compassion When Emotionally Distressed

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on April 19, 2015 in The Squeaky Wheel
When you want to reach out after an emotionally distressing event, which person is more likely to be compassionate and supportive, someone who has been through a similar experience or someone who has not? Read on to find out...

Meaningfully Salient Parenting

Meaningfully salient parenting can be spoken about, but, in essence, it is a deeply heartfelt and intimate engagement between parent and child, mother and father, and all within the family system.

What Causes You Inner Turmoil?

Being in heated conflict not with others but with yourself can—let’s face it—be agonizing. To be split down the middle, to endlessly waver between two (and sometimes more) options, can at its worst be almost unimaginably distressing. Obsessive to an extreme, it can lead to a paralysis of will (not to mention, much lost sleep). . . .

The Upside of Jealousy

Simply put, jealousy is motivated by fear. When fear is driving your behaviors, it is essential to tune into the cognitive components that accompany the fear to help you break it down and make it containable.

5 Reasons That Life Is Hard

If you're like me, you've got a computer, a smart phone, a TV, a couch, some pets, a great family, and lots of awesome things - but you still often find that life is hard. Evolutionary psychology can help explain why.

How The Politics of Memory Affects Us All

By Sam Osherson Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in Listen Up!
How our society remembers history affects our sense of identity and well-being. The current controversy about remembering the Vietnam War trickles through families up to the present day, and shapes what kind of future our children will encounter.

Can You Really Calm Disturbing Feelings With Just One Word?

By Meg Selig on April 16, 2015 in Changepower
Can one word calm your agitated feelings? Yes! Try this simple and effective word magic and ease your distress in a nanosecond.

Two Year Tragiversary of the Boston Marathon Bombings

By Russell Friedman on April 15, 2015 in Broken Hearts
Three unconnected events connect us to a loss of trust, a loss of safety, and a loss of innocence.

Body Smart

Your diaphragm plays a huge role in your tension and relaxation.

Why Some People Let Us Down When We Need Them

If someone has experienced a particular event, they’ll sympathize with those going through the same experience. But those who have gotten through difficult situations tend to be the harshest judges of those who fail under similar circumstances.

Curiosity: The Heart of Lifelong Learning

What makes children want to learn? Curious children often spend a great deal of time reading and acquiring knowledge because they sense a gap between what they know and what they want to know—not because they are motivated by grades.

When a Sociopath Is Hell Bent on Destroying You

By Carrie Barron M.D. on April 13, 2015 in The Creativity Cure
Sociopaths (anti-social personality, psychopath) can decimate a life. The mental, emotional or physical trauma can be stunning. The aftermath of sociopathic is unique because the assault instills a dim world view, a shaky sense of safety and a feeling that one has been visited by evil. Here are 16 points of focus to begin recovery.

Working Moms Have Healthier, More Successful Kids

Though we spend more time with our kids these days than decades ago, it may not be improving their developmental outcomes. A study of family time diaries shows that family income is a better predictor of children's academic and psychological outcomes than the amount of individual attention they receive from their parents between the ages of 3 and 11.

12 Keystone Principles That Bolster Resilience

These 12 keystone principles will increase your resilience and help you stay brave in the face of adversity.

Gracing Clients’ Lives

Boomer died suddenly at age 9, leaving a trail of progeny and well wishes for his therapy work with clients.

The Real Dangers of “Diagnosing” Everyone a Narcissist

By Craig Malkin on April 12, 2015 in Romance Redux
The current promiscuous use of "narcissist" not only trivializes the pain of people who've suffered greatly in abusive relationships, it generates massive confusion about what narcissism really is. Here's the truth about narcissism and narcissists--and why we need to stop, take a breath, and think carefully before we use either word as an insult.

7 Secrets to Hitting Your Reset Button

Dr. Michael Roizen, co-author with Dr. Oz on the best-selling YOU series, has just published a new book, “This is Your Do-Over.” The book provides 7 secrets to better physical health. Fortunately, these same secrets are the pathway to positive mental health, happiness, and well-being.

Why Stress Rules Our Lives

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on April 12, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Why today's adults feel more stress than did their predecessors -- and the lessons that we might learn from the past to better cope with our life stresses.

Worrying

By Joann P. Galst Ph.D. on April 12, 2015 in Fertility Factor
Uncertainty is one of the certainties of life. While difficult to cope with, there are ways to help yourself as you traverse your path to parenthood.

Business As Unusual

Bring it or blow it. Can you stand the feeling of intimacy and closeness in a new business relationship? Does this throw you off your game and make you back off, or blow it? In this entry we address how it is that irrelationship can trigger old, and familiar anxieties, kick up old song-and-dance routines, and ultimately, cause you to fail in your entrepreneurial efforts.

Happiness, Meaning and Taxes

By John Sean Doyle on April 11, 2015 in Luminous Things
Sometimes we find the meaning in our lives only when we set aside those things that are the best and most beautiful about us... Sometimes for our lives to matter we must delay our dreams and passionate engagements and instead do our duty.

Meet Danielle Meitiv: Fighting for Her Kids’ Rights

By Peter Gray on April 11, 2015 in Freedom to Learn
Danielle and Alexander Meitiv have been giving their children some of the same freedom that they themselves enjoyed as children, in a world that is safer than the one in which they grew up. As a consequence, they have been visited by police, and the county Child Protective Services have threatened to take their children away. Here is my interview with Danielle.

The Best of Times or the Worst of Times for Marriage?

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on April 10, 2015 in Living Single
Fewer people are marrying than ever before, as claims about the power of marriage—for adults, for children, and for society—intensify. How accurate are those claims? What are the implications of offering more incentives to people to get married and more benefits and protections once they do?

Bullying: A Case Study Revisited

They delighted in their own cleverness, and in their ability to get many uninvolved bystanders to sing a chorus as they waited in the food line. In other words, the humiliation of one girl became a popular bonding experience, and ad-libbing new lyrics was a way to get positive peer attention.

When Did “Victim” Become a Bad Word?

Our culture discourages people from acknowledging and/or talking about a victim's suffering. Many people feel embarrassed when they feel bad.. It’s as if they’ve done something wrong—as if their personality or their character has failed them in some way. It’s no wonder that many victims believe that to acknowledge their pain and suffering is to “feel sorry for themselves.”