Resilience Essential Reads

Near Misses Are Motivating

By Art Markman Ph.D. on July 03, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
Modern slot machines are fascinating devices. Most of them are not mechanical, they are electronic. That means that you pull the lever (or press a button) and the machine draws a random number that determines whether you have won. After that, the machine displays a show on the screen that ultimately lets you see whether you won.

Why Are People with Disabilities the Targets of Violence?

Why do offenders target people with disabilities? Are there links between types of disability and type of victimization? The Data Doctor answers a question from the aunt of a former student.

Do You Forgive and When Should You?

From our partner not doing their share of the chores to infidelity, brutal mass murder and everything in between, there are many times in life when we are called on to forgive (or not). Consider these psychological facts before making your personal decision about forgiveness.

How John Steinbeck Convinced Me to Start a Writing Diary

For years I resisted keeping any sort of diary or journal, but reading the writing diary of John Steinbeck made me look at keeping one in a different light.

Gay Marriage, Racism, and Obamacare: The Challenge of Caring

The gay marriage struggle, modern racism, and the disregard for the poor shown in the opposition to Obamacare all have a common root. We are wired for empathy, but not for a sense of common humanity and emotional openness. The challenge is not that we do not care: it is that we do.

An Honest, Heartfelt Portrayal of Bipolar Disorder

Hollywood depictions of mental illness usually are far off the mark. In Infinitely Polar Bear, Mark Ruffalo gives a rich, three dimensional, and deeply sympathetic performance as the bipolar father of two young girls.

How to Be Grateful for Not-So-Great Dads

With Father's Day approaching and blogs abuzz about what makes the quintessential dad, or top ‘pop’ gifts, what about those who have not-so-great dads? Is it possible for them to appreciate a holiday dedicated to fathers? Let’s get real and accept that mediocre or “bad” dads exist and consider this for a second: can one be thankful for a terrible father?

Young People, Not Alone in Their Despair

What is that cautionary tale? Things may not always—if ever—be as they seem.

Sleeplessly at War

Sleep deprivation can hurt or kill you - especially when you're a soldier.

Teach Kids the Wisdom of Failure Long Before Graduation

By Tamar Chansky Ph.D on June 09, 2015 in Worry Wise
Our job is to not wait for graduation to talk about failure and success. It’s a little late then. Rather, we need to be rolling out the red carpet for our kids throughout their education. Making saying “I don’t know” or making mistakes safe. Making “I don’t know for sure” a noble and defendable position.

Educational Prestige as Career Insurance

By Chris Rider Ph.D. on June 03, 2015 in The Continuum
Research finds that for two people with the same jobs, the one who graduated from the more prestigious school will suffer lesser career consequences if their employer fails, and that a school’s alumni network places a central role in maintaining one’s career trajectory. So, you might want to choose a graduate school based on the career insurance that the school provides.

7 Reasons for Gay & Lesbian Couples to Celebrate

Rainbow weddings and "Mr. & Mr." or "Mrs. & Mrs." events are a growing phenomenon -- but keeping the relationship strong is equally challenging regardless of the gender identity of the couple!

Simple, Everyday Actions That Support Mental Health

Learn simple ways to support yourself and others for better mental health.

The Importance of Detaching From Work

Typically when we hear that someone is “detached”, or is actively seeking “detachment”, this is viewed negatively. There are, however, instances where a certain amount of detachment is a good thing; in fact, there is considerable evidence that regularly detaching from work is an important key to thriving under stressful conditions.

The Psychology of Getting Back in the Batter’s Box

Want to learn about building resilience? Developing team values? Developing a positive identity? Little League baseball has got all of this and more.

Living After a Police Officer Dies

By Nancy Berns Ph.D. on May 15, 2015 in Freedom to Grieve
If you look closer, you’ll see some of them wiping away tears. You’ll see the exhausted look of fresh grief on many faces. For others, eyes shine with appreciation of being among family—not related by blood but related by blood lost.

5 Things Successful Working Parents Give Up

Successful parents focus their spare time and energy on raising the children - not wishing they didn't have to work

The Hidden Price of Progress

By Nick Tasler on May 11, 2015 in Strategic Thinking
Last month's protests in Baltimore reveal surprising paradox in the psychology of change.

Who Is Divorce Toughest On?

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on May 04, 2015 in Living Single
There are big differences among people in how well they do after getting divorced. A recent review article suggested 5 ways that resilient people differ from those who have the hardest time.

5 Ways to Heal a Broken Heart

How do you recover from one of the most painful life experiences?

Lessons From the Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

Do you live by the philosophy of Outside-In or Inside-Out? Love or hate the show, there’s some first rate psychological wisdom in it.

Life Is Not a Premortality Condition

By Allen J Frances M.D. on April 21, 2015 in DSM5 in Distress
Western medical science has changed life into a premortality condition and death into a failure of treatment.

5 Natural Reasons Why Life Is Hard

If you're like me, you've got a computer, a smart phone, a TV, a couch, some pets, a great family, and lots of awesome things - but you still often find that life is hard. Evolutionary psychology can help explain why.

Why Some People Let Us Down When We Need Them

If someone has experienced a particular event, they’ll sympathize with those going through the same experience. But those who have gotten through difficult situations tend to be the harshest judges of those who fail under similar circumstances.

Meet Danielle Meitiv: Fighting for Her Kids’ Rights

By Peter Gray on April 11, 2015 in Freedom to Learn
Danielle and Alexander Meitiv have been giving their children some of the same freedom that they themselves enjoyed as children, in a world that is safer than the one in which they grew up. As a consequence, they have been visited by police, and the county Child Protective Services have threatened to take their children away. Here is my interview with Danielle.

Black and Yellow: Blasian Narratives

These “Blasians” are creating something new, testing how much unity there is in such diverse experiences of Blackness and Asian-ness.

Should We Blame Depression for the Germanwings Crash?

By David B. Feldman Ph.D. on April 06, 2015 in Supersurvivors
In the aftermath of the Germanwings Flight 9525 tragedy, the media quickly pointed to the co-pilot's "severe depression" as a possible cause of the crash. Was this really the cause? Or does this tell us more about our society's continued stigmatization of mental illness than of what really happened?

7 Scientifically Proven Benefits of Gratitude

Take a few minutes each day to acknowledge all that you have to be thankful for. Showing just a little bit of gratitude can transform your life in incredible ways.

6 Traits of Successful People

Embracing and enacting these six traits will lead you along the same path to success as the notable individuals throughout history.

Whatever Doesn't Kill You, Will Only Make You Stronger?

By Dawn C. Carr MGS, Ph.D. on March 20, 2015 in The Third Age
When bad stuff happens to resilient people, it appears that in the short-term they don’t do anything different from what nonresilient people do. Instead, they feel something different about their ability to handle things. And as a result, they fare better physically and psychologically over the long-term.