Religion Essential Reads

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Seven Pathways to Thriving

By Ryan M. Niemiec Psy.D. on November 08, 2017 in What Matters Most?
New research reveals key personal enablers of thriving in life. Learn these seven pathways and the ingredients that can help you create them.

Awe in Religious and Spiritual Experience

By Andy Tix Ph.D. on November 07, 2017 in The Pursuit of Peace
Recent research is uncovering new connections between awe and spiritual experience.

How the God You Worship Influences the Ghosts You See

By Frank T. McAndrew Ph.D. on October 29, 2017 in Out of the Ooze
While religion may ease our terror of death, it may also increase our chances of being haunted by ghosts and other spirits during our lifetime.

Has the Islamic State Lost?

By Scott Atran Ph.D. on October 24, 2017 in In Gods We Trust
Not so fast. A field report from Kurdistan.

Immigrant Muslim Couples and Domestic Violence

By Lisa Aronson Fontes Ph.D. on September 22, 2017 in Invisible Chains
Non-Muslims are often uncertain how to help Muslim victims of intimate partner violence. Parveen Ali, Ph.D., advocates for greater understanding and activism to keep women safe.

Refining the Definition of Synchronicity

Our cosmos is finely tuned by numerous constants without which life on Earth would not be. Some of these coincidences have probabilities much lower than any personal coincidence.

Why Does God Want to Kill Me?

By Mario D Garrett Ph.D. on September 20, 2017 in iAge
We are meant to die. It is nature's way of making our species survive. But our strategy as humans has been to develop a large brain and to live longer, to which there's a downside.

Longing for More

By Andy Tix Ph.D. on September 19, 2017 in The Pursuit of Peace
What do you really want in life? Applying theory and research on the German concept of Sehnsucht may help you to better understand your quest and live well.

The Blame Game: We Love to Blame Others, But Why?

By Rob Henderson on August 29, 2017 in After Service
Why do we love blaming others? Research explains this quirk in our psychology.
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Why We Hate People Who Disagree

By Mark Alicke Ph.D. on August 13, 2017 in Why We Blame
Can we like people who disagree with us?

What Stops People From Cheating on Their Partners?

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on August 04, 2017 in ExperiMentations
Infidelity generally leads to pain and suffering for all involved, and is the most common factor in divorce. How do we resist temptation, making it more likely we'll stay together?

Religion, Secularism, and Homophobia

By Phil Zuckerman Ph.D. on July 21, 2017 in The Secular Life
Millennials are the least homophobic Americans, and also the least religious.

The Question of Contact

By David Kyle Johnson Ph.D. on July 10, 2017 in Plato on Pop
Can personal experience ever be used to justifiably override scientific evidence or argument?

Trump and Putin Do a Scene from a TV Series at G20 Summit

Artists unknowingly predict and sometimes create the future through their work. These coincidences point to a greater mind of which we are all a part.

Why the Five Stages of Grief Are Wrong

By David B. Feldman Ph.D. on July 07, 2017 in Supersurvivors
Despite our society’s widespread belief that grief proceeds in five simple stages, research shows that this isn’t the case. So what is true?

How Do We Handle Religion in Mental Health Settings?

By Jean Kim M.D. on June 27, 2017 in Culture Shrink
What is the best way to handle a client's religious views if they differ from your own?

Pope Francis, Conservation Psychology, Science, and Earth

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on June 13, 2017 in Animal Emotions
The Pope's encyclical letter on care for our common home has many very important ideas that are closely related to conservation psychology, anthrozoology, and the role of science.
Eric Jannazzo PhD

How Am I Doing at Life?

By Eric S. Jannazzo Ph.D. on June 06, 2017 in The Full Spectrum
Our culture's gamification of life has led to an epidemic anxiety, ever-buzzing though often just beyond our consciousness.

18 Questions to Ask Before Getting Married

By Andrea Bonior Ph.D. on May 24, 2017 in Friendship 2.0
The more love, the better. But love can often blind you to differences that need to be worked out before the wedding. Here are some unexpected things to think about.

The Real Truth About Generational Differences

Do generations actually exist? The truth about Millennials.

New Details Revealed About an Important Human Ancestor

Another cave of fossils and a surprising young age sheds dramatic new light on the origins of complex behaviors and humanity itself.

The Science of Religion for Everyone

Why insist that religion is immune from scientific study when cognitive and evolutionary theories have already made great strides in explaining a wide array of religious phenomena?

The New 'Religious Freedom' Is a Boon for Churches

By David Niose on April 19, 2017 in Our Humanity, Naturally
As courts and politicians continuously redefine religious liberty, hang on to your checkbook.

The Psychology Behind London's Terrorist Attacker

A recent study found that much tactical planning goes into lone-actor terrorist events.

Intellectual Humility Augments Nonpartisan Open-Mindedness

Regardless of your party or religious beliefs, new research from Duke shows that intellectual humility may be the key to breaking down barriers that divide us.

Martyrdom: Worst Idea Ever

By David Dillard-Wright Ph.D. on February 26, 2017 in Boundless
Martyrdom as an idea causes massive problems, on both the interpersonal and geopolitical levels.

Why Progressive Humanist Values Will Ultimately Prevail

Increasing geopolitical instability may threaten progressive, Humanist values in the short-term. But here's why I'm optimistic that these values will ultimately prevail.

Seeing Is Believing: Religion, Madness, and Mechanism

Mentalism conflicts with mechanism in both religion and art.

When There is Nothing to Say

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on January 08, 2017 in Obesely Speaking
Witnessing the transition from a place in time to a place in eternity.

Freedom of Dissociation

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on December 20, 2016 in Ambigamy
The freedom that many of us crave is the freedom from having to learn from our mistakes, indeed from facing inconvenient truths at all.