Relationships Essential Reads

3 Best and Worst Ways to Be a Friend When a Friend Needs You

A recent news article suggests that people need friends as well as lovers. When your friend’s relationship is in trouble, research shows what to do and not do as a confidant.

The Most Attractive (Invisible) Asset on a Date

If you set your device on the table on a date, beware: distraction signals disinterest. Instead, cultivate chemistry through the most significant silent compliment: your attention.

Bromance Over Romance, Say Men in New Study

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on October 17, 2017 in Living Single
A study of 30 heterosexual university men found that they valued their bromances more than their romances in every way except one.

Choosing a Romantic Partner

By Aaron Ben-Zeév Ph.D. on October 17, 2017 in In the Name of Love
It is mistaken to hold that keeping all romantic options open cannot be bad, as you can always select the best. There is a cost to this and too much of a good thing can be harmful.
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The Key to Forgiveness?

By Tim Cole Ph.D. on October 15, 2017 in Intimate Portrait
How easy is it to forgive a partner? The answer depends on how much you still believe that your partner cares and wants to do right by you.

The Science of Falling Out of Love

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on October 15, 2017 in Media Spotlight
New research explores the thorny question of how to cope after a failed relationship and what it can mean for long-term emotional health.

Don’t Justify What You Want to Change

We justify resentment by citing evidence of unfairness and how badly other people behave. The more adrenaline we need for justification, the more subject to confirmation bias.

Is Facebook Making You Depressed?

Long a concern of psychologists studying Facebook use, the possibility of users become depressed comes under scrutiny in newly published research.

When Someone You Love Becomes an Addict

With addiction, love isn't enough. Here's how to get help.

My Partner Cheated on Me—Should I Try to Make It Work?

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on October 12, 2017 in ExperiMentations
How do we decide whether to stay or go after someone cheats on us? New research sheds light on the decision-making process and helps us understand our own relationships.

Did You Get the Parental Guidance You Needed Growing Up?

As a child, did you frequently feel behind the curve—or eight-ball? If so, what was that like for you? And why do you think it was such a struggle for you to blend in with others?

6 Tips for Decoding Emotions in Text Messages

Is she mad at you? Is he in love with you? Here's some ways to decode emotions in text messages to find out.

How Helping Others Can Relieve Anxiety and Depression

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on October 10, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
A new study shows that thinking of others' well-being may be more beneficial than trying to boost our self-image.

Why People Hold Grudges and What to Do About Them

When people hold grudges against you, it can be painful and confusing. New research shows there’s a reason they act this way. Understanding why may help you feel a bit better.

Why We Dislike Photographs of Ourselves

Do you tend to dislike photographs of yourself? Here's why, and how you can improve your fondness of your photographs.

The Pressure to Be Perfect

Perfectionistic thinking is different from having high expectations and a drive to do a good job, in that the pressure to be perfect brings with it a host of negative thoughts.

Teen Dating, Sex Hit Record Lows for Recent Decades

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on October 07, 2017 in Living Single
The authors think the path to adulthood is slowing. I think the story is bigger than that.

2017 Nobel Literature Winner on Sycophancy

Ishiguro's brilliant portrait of the excruciating side of sycophantic self-nullification.

Why You Need a CyberBuddy

By David J Ley Ph.D. on October 04, 2017 in Women Who Stray
Finding people who can be a support to you, in dealing with the scary and intimidating world of online harassment, is an important and effective self-care strategy.

Romantic Conflict, Part 2

By Catalina Toma Ph.D. on October 03, 2017 in Virtual You
The good and the bad of managing romantic conflict through technological devices—texting, email, instant messenger.

Good Ways to Deal with Bad Bosses

By Victor Lipman on October 02, 2017 in Mind of the Manager
A bad boss can make a good job a misery. Here are five constructive ways to help your career by "managing your own management."
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Three Steps to Say “No” Gracefully

It can be really hard to say no. Despite my best attempts not to care what other people think of me, I still find myself wanting to be liked.

3 Signs You’re in a Bad Relationship

By Kelly Campbell Ph.D. on October 02, 2017 in More Than Chemistry
It is difficult to admit is that a relationship that started out so great has turned into something bad. Here are three signs that it might be time to end your relationship.

4 Road Signs You're in The Land Where Love Dies

By Kevin D. Arnold Ph.D., ABPP on October 01, 2017 in The Older Dad
Has your love been crushed by the weight of loneliness? Here are 4 things that can help revive your love.

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Create the Right Rituals

Meaningful rituals can show love by reflecting commitment, defining relationship boundaries, providing comfort, provoking memories, anchoring expectations, and providing pleasure.

How to Help a Grieving Friend

By Megan Devine on September 29, 2017 in It's OK That You're Not OK
Want to help a grieving friend, but afraid to say the wrong thing? A few simple rules can make things easier.

Midlife and Having Extramarital Sex? The Numbers Are Rising

By Douglas LaBier Ph.D. on September 28, 2017 in The New Resilience
A new survey reveals a surprising pattern.

The Paradox of Confiding in (Near) Strangers

By Lydia Denworth on September 28, 2017 in Brain Waves
Think you only discuss important matters with your closest confidants? A new book suggests your inner circle is bigger than you imagine.

Can Scientists Forecast Attraction?

Long-term attraction is more likely to occur in the presence of qualities facilitating attraction, together with personality traits such as availability and inscrutability.

A Classic Study of Sycophancy

The types of sucking up, or a pioneering theory of sycophancy