Essential Reads

Gutsy Third Person Self-Talk Utilizes Your Vagus Nerve

Excessive first person "self-talk" can increase egocentric bias. That said, using "non-first-person" pronouns and your own name has been found to promote healthy self-distancing.

Why Social Stigma Matters

Hate crimes are on the rise. New research helps to explain why.

Race-Related Trauma Disrupts Psychological Well-Being

The woes of race-related trauma in school and a perspective on well-being

13 Things You Never Knew About College Admissions

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on April 28, 2017 in Living Single
Evidence-based answers to some of the thorniest questions about fairness in college admissions.

More Posts on Race and Ethnicity

Psychology Is Like Oregon

Neither Oregon nor Psychology is diverse. Examining one's perspectives on diversity may help with change.

Interracial Marriages: What Has (and Hasn't) Changed

How many marriages are interracial today versus 60 years ago? Where are interracial marriages most common?

The 80% Edge

We may want to perform at our best, but at times illness, injury, or life events conspire to limit what we can truly expect of ourselves.How then can we maximize our performance?

Be True to Your School(s)

Sports team loyalties are similar to cultural identities. Sometimes you have more than one.

Blasphemy!

By Robert J King Ph.D. on May 09, 2017 in Hive Mind
Religious and Secular blasphemy accusations come from a similar source. And we need to call a halt to this nonsense.

No, I'm Not "Good"

This is a raw, honest account of my experience as the first Filipina and Pacific Islander Student Body President for the University of Washington during a year of societal turmoil.

Losing My Religion

A solitary religious experience is common in White Christian churches. In contrast, Asian ethnic churches emphasize being part of a community.

Unfriendly Skies: United Airlines and Police Violence

Abuse of an Asian American doctor on a United flight reminds us that education and status do not protect people of color from police brutality.

Are Accusations of Cultural Appropriation Misguided?

By Liane Gabora Ph.D. on April 29, 2017 in Mindbloggling
When Newton said he saw further by standing on the shoulders of giants what mattered was that he assimilated these 'giants' ideas perhaps more deeply than their own biological kin.

Face of Controversy

By Dara Greenwood Ph.D. on April 29, 2017 in Mirror, Mirror
Why Plagiarism Isn't the Only "Lesson in Exploitation" of Michelle Obama's Controversial Mural Image

Save Your Mixed Tears™ and Other Tips for Mixed Living

“Grappling with everything that comes with being mixed can be painful and feel conflicting, but one of your strongest allies in that journey is yourself.”

The Accidental Asian Tourist

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 28, 2017 in Minority Report
Traveling abroad has reminded me of how much the rest of the world has no concept of Americans of Asian descent.

Mona Haydar Speaks Your Language

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 26, 2017 in Brick by Brick
Haydar is no ordinary artist, and the concept behind Haydar’s first single, “Hijabi,” is anything but common.

What Is "American"?

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 25, 2017 in Minority Report
In today's political climate, the question of, "What is American?" is being challenged by those who find immigrants and people of color not fitting into their image of "American"..

"Get Out": From a White Woman’s Perspective

By Madelon Sprengnether on April 25, 2017 in Minding Memory
“Get Out” not only analyzes our nation’s history of dividing racial reality into either/or categories but also reveals the price we pay socially and culturally for doing so.

Report From NYC Satellite March for Science

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on April 23, 2017 in Rabble Rouser
The Satellite March for Science was 99% about Science, Not "Social Justice"

#MarchForScience, Social Media, Diversity and Identity

UCSF showcased a panel of scientific leaders at their Stand Up For Science day. What does this tell us about diversity in science, and about social media?

Why I am Marching in the March for Science

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on April 17, 2017 in Rabble Rouser
Two reasons to march in The March for Science.

Familismo

Familismo is a Latinx cultural value. But it can facilitate mental health for people from any cultural background.
National Center for Education Statistics/U.S. Department of Education. Retrieve from https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cnb.asp

Why Do Students of Color Feel Like an Imposter in School?

Do students of color have perceptions of intelligence? Some thoughts on feeling like an imposter

Can Religious Identity Inspire Pro-Environmental Action?

Religious identity can shape worldviews, build community, and provide networks of communication. So why is it so hard to motivate adherents to take pro-environmental action?

Working While Black

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 06, 2017 in Minority Report
We've heard of African-Americans being racially targeted while driving, a.k.a. "driving while black," but few are aware of another kind of bias.

Life as a Banana

Assimilation can be good for Asian Americans' mental health. But there may be hidden benefits of being Asian in the United States.

What Bias Looks Like for Me

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 03, 2017 in Minority Report
Do you feel warmly or coldly towards white people? How about Black people? Foreigners? Muslims? Christians? As you can see, there will always be those we feel more comfortable.

Dropping the Ball

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 02, 2017 in Minority Report
Whippings, lynchings, and killings of African-Americans are outlawed in this country but white NFL owners are showing us how they can operate like 19th century plantation "masters"

Bias isn't Bad

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 01, 2017 in Minority Report
Having candid conversations about race is very difficult as Caucasians may equate bias as being racist. As an Asian-American I can admit to having bias but the difference is....

Refugees Make Great Neighbors

Over time, refugees outperform native-born citizens academically, use health services less, and are less likely to commit crime. Inviting them into our communities is a win-win.

Child Abuse and Neglect: Why Prevention Is Important

Facts and resources for National Child Abuse Prevention Month.

On Interpreting Islamic Terror

We tend to see outgroup members as all alike to each other. But this simply isn't the case.