Race and Ethnicity Essential Reads

Treat Everyone Like They’re Running a Race

By Ryan Martin Ph.D. on July 15, 2015 in All the Rage
Why can’t we muster up that same level of encouragement and support for the people we run into on a daily basis?

Does Human Nature Make Genocide Inevitable?

I just appeared in a BBC debate about whether future genocide is inevitable. I said that it wasn't, especially if we utilize knowledge about human nature. Here's why I'm so optimistic about our evolved psychology and potential for peace.

There Are Monkeys Everywhere

We who are sighted can be the blindest of all. We can confuse what we see with what is really there, but what we see has to be taught to our eyes/minds. Actually there are monkeys all around us. You just have to learn to see them I will tell you how.

Afraid of Dark: Film Explores Stereotypes About Black Men

By Kyle D Killian Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in Intersections
"Afraid of Dark" documentary begins a conversation about the stereotypes African American males face on a daily basis.

Gay Marriage, Racism, and Obamacare: The Challenge of Caring

The gay marriage struggle, modern racism, and the disregard for the poor shown in the opposition to Obamacare all have a common root. We are wired for empathy, but not for a sense of common humanity and emotional openness. The challenge is not that we do not care: it is that we do.

A 20-Second Experiment in Racial Stereotypes

A 20-second demonstration of where stereotypes come from. Knowledge is power.

Can We Choose Our Identity?

By David J Ley Ph.D. on June 23, 2015 in Women Who Stray
Caitlyn Jenner, Rachel Dolezal, Barrack Obama. The news today is filled with a debate about how much choice and control we truly have, over defining who and what we are.

Does Black Irish Count as "Black?"

By Christopher Ryan on June 17, 2015 in Civilized to Death
Any conversation about race has to begin with the fact that nobody really knows what "race" means.

#transracial

By Laurie Essig Ph.D. on June 14, 2015 in Social Studies
Rachel Dolezal and Caitlyn Jenner force us to face the messiness of our true selves.

Black Comedians Poke Fun at Racial Stereotypes

Black Comedians Poke Fun at Racial Stereotypes. The comedian’s goal is to get us to laugh with him while laughing at him. By Michelle Stephens, PhD

Couldn't Have Said It Better: Baltimore Riots 2015

A short piece that explains why some of the responses in the media to the Baltimore riots feel particularly damning to Black Americans, especially when considered in context.

A Great Time for Women in STEM

By Jesse Marczyk on April 15, 2015 in Pop Psych
Women seem to be advantaged when it comes to getting hired in STEM fields. They need only apply.

Evolutionary Psychology Is Not About "Bettering the Species"

People often think that since "evolution" has a lot to do with speciation, then "evolutionary psychology" must be about "bettering the human species" in some way. It's not. At all. Read this if you want to know what evolutionary psychology is really about.

5 Questions We Often Ask Ourselves After Microaggressions

Society’s awareness of microaggressions and its many expressions have increased over the past few years. The internal dialogues and psychological struggles that microaggressions cause marginalized people, however, are rarely discussed and remain largely “Unseen and Unheard” by the general public. I hope this helps.

Meet Danielle Meitiv: Fighting for Her Kids’ Rights

By Peter Gray on April 11, 2015 in Freedom to Learn
Danielle and Alexander Meitiv have been giving their children some of the same freedom that they themselves enjoyed as children, in a world that is safer than the one in which they grew up. As a consequence, they have been visited by police, and the county Child Protective Services have threatened to take their children away. Here is my interview with Danielle.

Looking in the Cultural Mirror at 100, the Top 10

Five years ago, I began writing pieces for Looking in the Cultural Mirror. While psychology may define itself as the science of behavior, when it comes to people it often seems more like the science of American behavior than of human behavior everywhere. This, my 100th piece, discusses the blog’s background and aims. It offers links to the most popular 10.

Black and Yellow: Blasian Narratives

These “Blasians” are creating something new, testing how much unity there is in such diverse experiences of Blackness and Asian-ness.

Socioeconomic Factors Impact a Child's Brain Structure

In the largest study of its kind, a team of investigators from nine different universities have identified a correlative link between family income and a child’s brain structure.

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

For several years now a bipartisan group, which includes experts in the area of boys’ issues and fatherhood—and many of these are women, some of whom strongly identify as feminists—has been pushing for a White House Council on Boys and Men which would parallel the one that President Obama established for women and girls shortly after he took office in 2009.

Secrets Your Brain Hides From You

Why you can't trust your brain

Want to Live Longer? Make Good Friends.

By Dawn C. Carr MGS, Ph.D. on March 15, 2015 in The Third Age
It may be surprising, but who you choose as a friend matters, and so does the quality of those friendships. Good relationships have a potent beneficial impact on your health.

Are Pregnancy, Marriage, and Divorce Contagious?

We think our relationship decisions are decisions we make: but are we being influenced by our friends?

Do Generations Exist?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Is it misleading to speak about a self-absorbed “Me Generation” or jaded, cynical GenXers, overeducated and underemployed?

Malignant Narcissism and the Murder of a Parent

By Carrie Barron M.D. on February 24, 2015 in The Creativity Cure
This blog explores Malignant Narcissism and the damaging impact that it can have on family members and others.

Object Permanence In Adult Life

Eye contact, a pat on the back, a smile of appreciation, and a shared laugh-out-loud of sheer pleasure are the best and most direct signals of communication, after all.

Sticks and Stones May Break My Bones But...

By Neil Farber M.D, Ph.D. on February 20, 2015 in The Blame Game
Some refuse to use the term "Islamic Extremists" to describe the terrorist group, ISIS, calling them "Violent Extremists." By attributing cause and accountability, we are better able to define who they are, delineate their mission and goals, and derive solutions to stop them. Naming them DOES NOT blame, or indict non-violent Muslims - not guilt by religious association.

How Old Is Language?

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on February 19, 2015 in Language in the Mind
Can the time-depth of language be uncovered without a time-machine? Recent evidence, ranging from genetic dating, to new archaeological finds, is transforming what we know about language's vintage.

Feminist Pedagogy in the Classroom

By APA Division 15 on February 10, 2015 in PsychEd
One way to integrate critical thinking into classrooms is through feminist teaching. But, what is feminist teaching? How can educators use feminist teaching as a means to bring critical thinking to classrooms?

Amazing Website Predicts All Your Political Opinions!*

I've posted an interactive tool that shows how various features (race, religion, gender, education, etc.) relate to a range of political opinions (abortion, same-sex marriage, immigration, healthcare, etc.). Don't let a focus on your own views get in the way of learning about fascinating patterns in the data.

13 Things Mentally Strong People Don't Do

Mentally strong people know that good habits aren't enough. You also have to avoid the bad habits that could hold you back from reaching your full potential.