Essential Reads

There’s a Bright Side to Personality’s Dark Triad

13 Ways to Find out if Your Personality is Dark or Bright

Prions, Memory and PTSD

A conversation with Nobel prize winning neuroscientist Dr. Eric R. Kandel

Can You Lose Your Eyesight for Psychological Reasons?

Can psychology explain why Germanwings crash pilot believed he was losing sight?

What's Wrong with Antianxiety Drugs?

A possible path towards better options

Recent Posts on Psychiatry

The GPS Approach to Chronic Pain

By Mark Borigini M.D. on September 01, 2015 in Overcoming Pain
It would seem that chronic pain that is experienced as a noxious physical stimulant, and is often hand-in-hand with symptoms whose origin lie in the emotional and cognitive parts of the human being, is fueled by neural links between the somatosensory part of the brain and those parts that process and express emotional and cognitive brain outputs.

Bad Science Creates False and Dangerous Beliefs

Science is what is used to justify psychiatry today. If it is science at all, it is bad science. Both the pharmaceutical industry and many of today’s psychological theories including those that support CBT, employ the hoax of evidence-based psychiatry.

The Lure of ISIS

By Saul Levine M.D. on September 01, 2015 in Our Emotional Footprint
Thousands of youth from multiple countries, cultures, religions, and social classes have abruptly left their homes and families to join ISIS, a dangerous, destructive, messianic Islamic self-styled nation (caliphate). They abandon their past values and relationships. become zealous True Believers, committed to their charismatic leaders and their God, dedicated to victory

Is it Normal to ‘Hear Voices’?

By Joe Pierre M.D. on August 31, 2015 in Psych Unseen
Hearing voices can be a normal experience, but what are auditory hallucinations and what does hearing them mean?

The Diagnostic Debate, Continued

How are people impacted on by the pervasiveness of the biologically-based diagnostic model? Ongoing international survey shows people are grateful to be asked what they think!

There’s a Bright Side to Personality’s Dark Triad

We know that people high on psychopathy and related traits lurk in the “dark side” of personality, but what about its opposite? Having a “bright side” to your personality may sound positive, but it can create its own shadows in your life. See how you rate on these 13 typical qualities of the colorful (but still dark) personality.

Psychiatry and Frankenstein

Effective psychiatric treatments may serve as unwanted reminders that the human mind is a machine that can be broken and remedied with mechanical fixes

Defusing Anger Using Respect

By Joseph A Shrand M.D. on August 28, 2015 in The I-M Approach
Anger is a powerful and scary emotion designed to change the behavior of someone else. But respect is equally powerful, a behavior designed to change the emotion of someone else. Read how respect is used in this story.

What is Prescription Misuse?

Although "prescription drug abuse" is a hot topic, it seems that many don't understand exactly what this entails. Here, we describe the various types of prescription drug abuse and how it can impact one's life.

Is the Motivation Behind the Virginia Shootings Contagious?

Paul Mullen, Christopher Cantor and colleagues have published an analysis of possible copy-cat mass slayings, where they argue the influence of one rampage on another may have occurred across continents, and even over many years.

Algorithms Predict Schizophrenia with 100% Accuracy

New algorithms can predict future psychosis with 100% accuracy by detecting disjointed thoughts in speech.

Could Psychiatrists Have Prevented the Virginia Shootings?

As reports began to appear of the disturbed background of that shooter, the media seems to have universally decided when reporting that case, that mass shootings are readily explained by severe mental illness.It is possible that the same media reaction and deductions may follow these tragic Virginia Live TV shootings, though it is early days in coverage of the case.

Prions, Memory and PTSD

By Shaili Jain M.D. on August 26, 2015 in The Aftermath of Trauma
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has been described as a disorder of memory. It has become quite apparent that there are two types of memory in PTSD. The work of Eric R. Kandel forms the basis for much of what we understand about how memories are formed.

Anger's Allure: Are You Addicted to Anger?

By Jean Kim M.D. on August 25, 2015 in Culture Shrink
Anger is becoming an epidemic; it's worth exploring the biological and psychological reasons why anger can become addictive for people, and alternatives to kick the habit.

Is Your Child's Psychiatrist an Autism Expert?

By Amy S.F. Lutz on August 24, 2015 in Inspectrum
Seventy percent of the autistic population suffers from co-morbid psychiatric disorders, yet psychiatrists receive very little training specific to developmental and intellectual disorders. The Developmental Neuropsychiatry Training Consortium hopes to change that.

Pervasive Adult Developmental Disorder

Pervasive Adult Developmental Disorder is a conceptualization I developed in because I found the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV categorization system for severe mental illness to be inadequate.

The Benefits of Personality Disorder

By Neel Burton M.D. on August 23, 2015 in Hide and Seek
Everyone suffers for who he is, and, very often, our greatest strength is also the germ of our deepest suffering.

Pet Ownership and Mental Health

By Azadeh Aalai Ph.D. on August 21, 2015 in The First Impression
Does the research on pet ownership validate the notion of man's best friend?

Sometimes I Hate Him

By Joseph A Shrand M.D. on August 21, 2015 in The I-M Approach
The I-M Approach is a strength based model of radical acceptance applied as easily to psychiatry and addiction as to every day life. This is the first of a series of stories inviting discussion from the readers about this model of care and approach to life in general. It is based on our human desire to be valued, and what can happen when we worry that we are not.

Can Genetics Help Choose ADHD Meds?

Anticipating Better ADHD Med Outcomes with Genetics: How Does It Work?

The Rwandan Genocide

What were you doing on the afternoon of April 7, 1994? You probably have no idea – unless you were getting married, lost a loved one or experiencing another major life event. If you were in Rwanda, you may have been watching your mother, father, brother or sister being slaughtered and expecting to be next.

Can You Lose Your Eyesight for Psychological Reasons?

What is referred to as 'medically unexplained visual loss' or non-organic visual loss (NOVL), is reported to occur in 1 to 5% of patients attending ophthalmology clinics. In many cases it continues without improvement for an extended period.

America's Infatuation with Jim Harbaugh

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on August 16, 2015 in Obesely Speaking
While other college coaches are busy strategizing to win football games, Jim Harbaugh is conquering a nation without trying.

What's Wrong with Antianxiety Drugs?

Recognition of the multiplicity of the brain systems that contribute to fear and anxiety disorders is the first step towards the development of better treatments.

Beware the Witch-hunt: Depression, Pilots and Air Crashes

Should pilots undertake regular psychological assessment? And how to make it accurate and reliable?

Psychiatry in Crisis

By Neel Burton M.D. on August 15, 2015 in Hide and Seek
Is the medical model still helping?

Creating Your Soul in Every Moment

If you think of your soul as the essence of “who” you are, then it opens the possibility that you can create this essence just as you create many other aspects of your life: what you do with your life, your values, what you consider virtues, etc. So in contemplating this notion I realized that not only do we create our lives, we also have the ability to create who we are,

Addiction, connection and the Rat Park study

By Adi Jaffe Ph.D. on August 14, 2015 in All About Addiction
Some recent chatter about addiction's causes has moved the pendulum back to social and environmental dysfunction. While I'm happy we're starting to look at the whole picture, we might want to be careful swinging too hard.

Suicide: It’s Time to Break Taboos

The suicide taboo, which has deep roots in our culture, has concealed a sad reality: that it can affect anyone at any time of life, regardless of socioeconomic status, age, race, gender or religion.

Best Practices in the Treatment of ADHD

While the last blog post focused on best practices for diagnosing ADHD, here we turn our focus to treatment best practices.