Essential Reads

The Self "Loathsome Gluttony" of Binge-eating Disorder

When eating to live turns to out of control living to eat

Analyzing Analysts

Shrinks documents psychiatry's new focus on medical treatments of mental illness

10 Tips to Change From Reactive to Proactive in Situations

10 Ways to Be Less Reactive in Difficult Situations

Breakup: How to Tell If You Suffer from Complicated Grief

The emotional responses to a severe breakup can resemble the responses to death.

Recent Posts on Psychiatry

Real Psychiatry and Darwinian Evolution are One and the Same

The basic principle for the development of human personality is at one with Darwinian evolution. Psychotherapy is the treatment that addresses the human issues in precisely the way they were constructed in the first place.

Using Time-Outs: Top 5 Mistakes Parents Make

Time-outs do not cause brain damage and are an effective strategy to reduce negative behavior in children. However, they can easily be used in less than optimal ways. Keeping in mind these 5 common errors can help parents get the most out of this valuable technique.

Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, MD, Inaugurated

Surgeon General Vivek Murthy's inaugural speech calls for civic leaders to ignite discussions on mental health, and to bring the topic "out of the shadows".

The Self "Loathsome Gluttony" of Binge-eating Disorder

Binge eating disorder (BED) is a new diagnostic category in psychiatry's DSM-5 although it was first described in 1959. Already pharmaceutical companies are heavily marketing their medications to this new population.

Analyzing Analysts

In Shrinks, Jeffrey Lieberman reviews psychiatry's "tumultuous history," and its current emphasis on the medical treatment of mental illnesses. He maintains that psychiatry fares best when it avoids the extremes of reductionist neurobiology and the psychodynamic element in existential disease. That said, Shrinks does not address important questions about talk therapy.

Medical Model? Recovery Model? No Problem

By Stephen Seager M.D. on April 20, 2015 in BrainTalk
Regarding the treatment of serious mental Illness, there is currently a fundamental rift between two camps: the Medical Model and the Recovery Model.

10 Tips to Change From Reactive to Proactive in Situations

All of us encounter experiences in life when we may be temporally overwhelmed by a negative emotion, be it anger, pressure, nervousness, despair, or confusion. In these situations, how we choose to “master the moment” can make the difference between proactive versus reactive, and confidence versus insecurity. Here are ten ways to be less reactive in difficult situations...

Alpha Brain Waves Boost Creativity and Reduce Depression

Neuroscientists have discovered that increasing alpha brain waves through electrical stimulation or mindfulness can boost creativity and minimize depression.

The Hand that Rocks the Cradle Rules—But Whose Hand Is It?

The history of the nature/nurture controversy reveals fraud on the nurture side and developments in our view of nature that the imprinted brain theory readily explains.

Cyberbullying? There’s an App for That

In the 2004 teen comedy “Mean Girls,” a central plot point is a notebook filled with vicious rumors and gossip — the “Burn Book,” it is called. Now the concept has been taken into the social media age with the “Burnbook” app.

How The Politics of Memory Affects Us All

By Sam Osherson Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in Listen Up!
How our society remembers history affects our sense of identity and well-being. The current controversy about remembering the Vietnam War trickles through families up to the present day, and shapes what kind of future our children will encounter.

Breakup: How to Tell If You Suffer from Complicated Grief

Sometimes it is impossible to let go of grief. When you continue to grieve a loss, your condition is called complicated grief. Complicated grief is so severe that psychiatrists now consider it for inclusion in the psychiatric manual for diagnosing mental disorders. Here is how to tell if you suffer from complicated grief.

Parental Warmth: Simple, Powerful, and Often Challenging

Amidst all the chatter about parenting styles and techniques, it is easy to forget about the importance of warmth. This overlooked dimension is found to be critical to child development in study after study, so why don’t we give it the attention it deserves?

Hoarders and Collectors

By Elias Aboujaoude M.D. on April 16, 2015 in Compulsive Acts
A hoarding diagnosis should have nothing to do with a person’s net worth or a clinician’s take on what is worth collecting and what does not deserve getting attached to.

Treatments Available to Long Term Abduction Victims

A variety of therapeutic techniques that focus on empowerment and reconnecting with family can help abduction victims heal.

Is There an Epidemic of Fake Service Dogs?

In order to gain access to public places such as restaurants and hotels with their pets a number of people are purchasing service dog vests and meaningless assistance dog identification cards and certificates from commercial online service dog registries. These do not require that the dog be trained nor that the person have a disability.

Screening Test for Mental Illness

In the past weeks as our sympathies turned to families of the victims of Flight 9525, many have asked how we can allow such evil to exist in our world. But the right question is “How can we allow a person with serious mental illness to fly a commercial airplane?”

Breaking Good

By Adi Jaffe Ph.D. on April 13, 2015 in All About Addiction
Coming face to face with your own shame and emotion about the past can be hard. This is me trying to do it in public.

The DSM 5 - Who Cares?

By Stephen Seager M.D. on April 13, 2015 in BrainTalk
DSM 5. Misinformation and misconception

Mental Illness On Reality TV: Helpful Or Harmful?

By Seth Meyers Psy.D. on April 12, 2015 in Insight Is 20/20
A new TV show begs a very basic question: Does showing the intensely emotional moments of untreated mentally ill individuals help or harm the overall cause?

Can We Exercise Too Much?

By Pirkko Markula Ph.D. on April 12, 2015 in Fit Femininity
Physical activity has been proven to improve physical and psychological health. However, is any amount of exercise good? Too much exercise can prevent psychological well-being. When excessive exercise develops into exercise dependence, it becomes compulsive behaviour that controls the exerciser's life.

Faulty Reporting on ADHD

By Christopher Lane Ph.D. on April 11, 2015 in Side Effects
Newspaper of record criticized for its tardy response to overmedicalization.

Dying Well Means Dying At Home

By Allen J Frances M.D. on April 11, 2015 in DSM5 in Distress
There is no worse death than a hospital death. Dying well means dying at home. This requires preparation and preparation requires recognizing that dying is a necessary, and indeed desirable, part of life. Preparing for a good death may be one of the best decisions you will ever make in your life.

Make Meditation a Habit to Improve Your Life

There is no doubt at all that a regular meditation practice improves health in a number of ways, but the caveat is that the practice must be regular.

Should Elective Surgery Be Delayed for Very Young Children?

Accumulating evidence supports the possibility that general anesthetics have adverse effects on brain development in very young children. A recent New England Journal of Medicine editorial suggests that parents and doctors consider the risks and benefits of delaying elective surgery until children are 3 years old or older.

The Cerebellum, Cerebral Cortex, and Autism Are Intertwined

Neuroscientists have identified a new marker for autism based on abnormal connectivity between specific regions of the cerebellum and the cerebral cortex.

Ambushed by Eldercare? You’re Not Alone

How to handle the multiple challenges of eldercare.

Recent Links Between Food and Mood

By Gary L Wenk Ph. D. on April 08, 2015 in Your Brain on Food
A poor diet that was high in saturate fats and caloric levels lead to depression. Fortunately, it is never too late to take advantage of the benefits of a healthy diet.

We Break Our Own Hearts

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on April 07, 2015 in Obesely Speaking
Our perception is our worst enemy in love and addictive behaviors.

Skinny Shaming

By Alexis Conason Psy.D. on April 07, 2015 in Eating Mindfully
Sometimes I feel like I'm living in the Goldilocks fable. This one is too fat…that one is too thin…is anyone just right? While the media has continued to bombard us with the usual fat shaming messages, I’ve also been noticing a lot of skinny shaming recently.