Psychiatry Essential Reads

Gray & White Matter MRI Opposite in Autistics vs. Psychotics

Brain-imaging reveals white and grey matter in autistic brains vary oppositely to schizophrenic brains, suggesting a new diagnostic tool only explained by the diametric model.

Psychiatrists, Sorcerers, and Transmissible Brain Disease

By David Rettew M.D. on December 06, 2016 in ABCs of Child Psychiatry
Fear and stigma about mental illness keeps our society from facing up to its transmissibility; this paradox resonates with the history of Kuru, a transmissible brain disease.

New Research Reveals Neural Roots of Social Anxiety

People with social anxiety disorder have an extreme fear of new social objects or situations. New neuroscience research shows how observational learning plays into this fear.

Can You Spice Up Your Antidepressant?

Is curcumin the next supplement to take psychiatry by storm? Not yet, but there's some promising data so far.

Parenting Matters, Especially for “Difficult” Kids

By David Rettew M.D. on November 25, 2016 in ABCs of Child Psychiatry
No pressure, but a new study indicates that parenting behaviors matter most for temperamentally challenging kids.

The Diametrics of Personal Space: Autism vs. Schizophrenia

New research into the sense of personal space.

Early-Life Environment Influences Brain Growth and Behavior

Two recent studies demonstrate that environment influences brain growth and emotional behavior in children and adolescents.

Can One Be Autistic and Bipolar at the Same Time?

Co-occurrence of autism and bipolar disorder seems ruled out by the diametric model until you realize that different mental modules and brain centres may be involved in each.

Your Brain on Daylight Savings

Daylight Savings transitions can affect our delicate circadian clocks, leading to disruptions in behavior and mood.
Image Point Fr/Shutterstock

Seasonal Affective Disorder: What You Need to Know

With the end of Daylight Savings Time, it's a good time to delve into the impact that lack of sunlight can have on mood, sleep and energy.

Effective Up and Down the Line

By Peter D Kramer on November 04, 2016 in In Practice
A recent study finds that antidepressants work across the spectrum of major depression, for patients with severe, moderate, and mild forms of the disorder. Will the press notice?

Helping Your College Student Cope With Psychosis

By Marcia Morris M.D. on October 30, 2016 in College Wellness
Resilience. Hope. Recovery. Remember these words if your child has an episode of psychosis.

Children's Dreams and Nightmares

By Patrick McNamara Ph.D. on October 30, 2016 in Dream Catcher
Recurring nightmares in early childhood need to be treated as they may portend later behavioral problems

In Pakistan, Schizophrenia Denialism Is a Death Sentence

By Joe Pierre M.D. on October 28, 2016 in Psych Unseen
Pakistan has ruled that schizophrenia isn't a mental illness, paving the way for the execution of a mentally ill prisoner. Could something similar happen in the U.S.?

10 Subtle Signs of Psychosis

There are a number of subtle signs that you or a loved one may be mildly psychotic. Read on to find out what to look for.

Goldwater 2016: Are Psychiatrists' Opinions of Trump Rigged?

By Joe Pierre M.D. on October 25, 2016 in Psych Unseen
5 reasons why psychiatrists and psychologists should heed the “Goldwater Rule”

Misuse of Stimulants by College Students

Nonmedical use of prescription stimulants by college students is common. Students who misuse these drugs have a higher prevalence of alcohol use disorder and conduct disorder.
Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock.com

Trump's Temperament: Not Narcissistic, But Not Normal

By Nassir Ghaemi M.D., M.P.H. on October 23, 2016 in Mood Swings
Beyond pejoratives terms to scientifically based concepts

The Bizarre Outbreak of Hallucinations in Oregon

By Robert Bartholomew Ph.D. on October 19, 2016 in It's Catching
A mysterious outbreak of hallucinations has U.S. authorities baffled.

5 Steps for Navigating (or Leaving) a Toxic Relationship

By Ralph Ryback M.D. on October 17, 2016 in The Truisms of Wellness
Navigating toxic relationships is a process that requires help from supportive friends, family, and professionals. These tips can help you chart your course and build better bonds.

No, Placebo Response Rates Are Not on the Rise

By Peter D Kramer on October 13, 2016 in In Practice
New research finds that placebo responses are not on the rise in antidepressant trials—a result that suggests the impact of placebo has been exagerated

Mental Health Care Could Look Really Different Soon (Or Not)

As one state sits on the precipice of funding healthcare in a completely different way, the number of possibilities for change in the way mental health care is delivered are huge.

World Mental Health Day: Let's Break the Stigma

10 Common Warning Signs: Identifying a mental health condition.
Amelia Panico Photography

A Profile of Siddhartha Mukherjee

A profile of the Pulitzer Prize winning Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee

A Return of Psychedelic Medications?

Recently, there has been increased interest in the use of psychedelic drugs for the treatment of addictions and other psychiatric disorders.

Bad Moms: Social Stigmas and Postpartum Mental Illness

By Jean Kim M.D. on September 29, 2016 in Culture Shrink
We need to examine how the biological symptoms of postpartum mental illnesses intersect with the high societal expectations regarding the "perfect mother."

Help Your College Student Combat a Major Danger: Depression

By Marcia Morris M.D. on September 25, 2016 in College Wellness
With the right treatment plan, your child can develop the tools to fight her way out of the darkness of depression and into the light of recovery.

10 Things to Know About Déjà Vu

Acceptance of déjà vu has widened in recent decades, and research psychologists are just beginning to understand this phenomenon.

The Cutting Edge of Gut Health and Disease

By Emily Deans M.D. on September 18, 2016 in Evolutionary Psychiatry
What is the state of the science on gut health and disease? World experts shared their latest findings on the microbiota at a recent symposium at Harvard Medical School.

The Mothers of Mankind

Proposed self-domestication of our species raises the issue of who the domesticators were. Insights of the imprinted brain theory argue they were ancestral mothers.