Psychiatry Essential Reads

No Horsing Around About the Human-Equine Bond

For millennia, horses have worked hard for humans, and today they serve as the ultimate therapists. Here's a look at the important roles horses play in the human experience.

Inside the Mind of the Munich Mass Killer

This kind of conundrum has led some psychiatrists to suggest mass or spree killers suffer from a rare disorder so far unclassified and unknown in the textbooks.

Stronger Drugs, Stronger Placebos

By Peter D Kramer on July 19, 2016 in In Practice
New research is elucidating the biological underpinnings of the placebo response. The results might enhance our appreciation of real—inherently effective—medications.

Risk of Relapse to Alcohol Drops After 5 Years of Sobriety

By Matthew MacKinnon MD on July 18, 2016 in Neuraptitude
New research reveals that a former alcoholic's risk of relapse after 5 years of sobriety is about the same as the risk of developing alcoholism in the general US population.

The Powerful Psychology Behind Cleanliness

Organization is a topic that's sweeping the internet. What is it about cleanliness that makes us feel so good? Here's a look at the science behind our need to be tidy.

A Possible New Class of Antidepressants

Recent advances in knowledge about the generation of new brain cells throughout the lifespan are leading to the development of new drugs to treat neuropsychiatric illnesses.

Not All Muslims? Not All Mental Illness Either.

Yes, moderate Muslims are too often painted with the same brush as jihadists, but people with mental illness are no more monochromatic than the Muslim world.

An MRI-Based Approach to Understanding Conduct Disorder

By Kevin Murnane, Ph.D. on June 28, 2016 in The Info Monkey
Covariance in the thickness of the cerebral cortex shows promise of improving both the theoretical understanding and clinical treatment of conduct disorder.

The Last Time Biological Psychiatry Over-Reached

Purely genetic explanations for a variety of psychiatric and behavioral disorders are currently in vogue in many mental health circles. It is not the first time.

DNA Imaging: Icon of a New, Genomic Literacy

Images of DNA pose the problem of genomic literacy and raise questions about what the text of the genome means, with potentially revolutionary implications for society.

Raise the Child You Have, Not the One You Wish You Had

By Amy Tuteur M.D. on June 21, 2016 in Push Back
Too many children with disabilities are going without help because their parents wish the child didn’t have a disability, so they pretend that he doesn't.

Your Brain on Folate

The links between folate and depression are complicated, but not beyond understanding.
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Cortisol and PTSD, Part 1

Recently, I spoke with Dr. Yehuda about cortisol, intergenerational transmission of stress, and the future of PTSD treatment and research.

14 Career Options for Psychology Majors

There are thousands of psychology-related jobs everywhere, but these are the most common positions companies look for.

The Big Divide in US Psychiatry

Peter Kramer just brought out a new book, Ordinarily Well: The Case for Antidepressants. The book is fluently written, interestingly argued and deserves wide sales.

TMS for Depression Adds to Treatment Options

When psychotherapy and medication are not enough in treating major depression,TMS is an example of a new method that may help.

Cognitive Impairment in Depression

Cognitive symptoms of depression may not respond well to treatment with antidepressant medications.

Why Are Some Soldiers With Combat Stress More Resilient?

By Eric Newhouse on June 07, 2016 in Invisible Wounds
Researchers in San Diego have found genetic differences in two groups of combat vets—those with PTSD and those without it—that may explain why some are more resilient.

Can You "Grow Out Of" ADHD?

ADHD is typically thought of as a childhood illness. Still, the number of adults living with ADHD is greater than the number of adults who live with OCD and schizophrenia.

Cities, Children, and Psychosis

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on June 01, 2016 in Media Spotlight
Are children who grow up in cities more vulnerable to developing mental illness later in life? A new research study raises disturbing implications about the impact of city life.

Now You See It: Diametric Differences Revealed in the Brain

The first study to image brain activity in game playing according to participants’ autistic as opposed to psychotic tendencies reveals patterns consistent with the diametric model.

Favorable Trajectories

By Peter D Kramer on May 27, 2016 in In Practice
How distinctive are antidepressants? Answers from research that looks at progress made by individual patients.

Central Planning and U.S Child Psychopharmacology

Is there overcontrol of the prescription of antipsychotics to children and adolescents in the U.S.?

The Infant “Crying It Out” Debate: Chapter 615

A new Australian study looks at two different infant sleep interventions and whether they work or cause damage.

Justice Breyer: Social Media Qs “Staring at Us in the Face”

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer weighed in on social media at the APA last week. Social Media problems are "staring us in the face," he said, and neuropsychology matters.

Who Pays for Mental Illness?

Estimated costs of schizophrenia in the U.S. were $155 billion in 2013. Only 1/4 of costs were for health care for the mentally ill. What accounts for the remaining $117 billion?

ADHD Is Overdiagnosed, Here's Proof

By Allen J Frances M.D. on May 23, 2016 in Saving Normal
Being the youngest kid in the class puts you at great risk for inappropriate ADHD diagnosis and treatment. We should let kids outgrow immaturity, not treat it with a pill.

Compulsive Hair Pulling Is More Common Than You Think!

Do you compulsively pull out your own hair? Feel like you are the only one who does this? You are not alone!

Using Brain Scans to Diagnose Mental Disorders

Some clinics are using brain imaging (especially SPECT) for diagnosing psychological conditions like ADHD and depression, but there's little science to support this use.

Behavioral Addictions: A Dangerous and Slippery Slope

By Allen J Frances M.D. on May 16, 2016 in Saving Normal
The potential list of behavioral addictions can conceivably expand to include almost every area of activity that people feel passionate about.