Essential Reads

The Adjustment of Adoptees

Studying the behavior and adjustment of adopted children

The Backlash Against Psychiatric Diagnoses

Why bad things can cause real diagnoses, except in psychiatry

After the Germanwings Crash, 7 Lessons About Mental Illness

Clinicians can miss diagnoses, and patients can keep diagnoses private.

Precision Medicine’s Cultural Limits

Even if we had an Oracle Chip, we'd still need doctors.

Recent Posts on Psychiatry

Pilot suicide: A likely scenario

By Nassir Ghaemi M.D., M.P.H. on March 31, 2015 in Mood Swings
Suicide is unpredictable. It was depression. The antidepressants caused it. Why all these views are questionable, and why there is a more probable psychiatric scenario to explain the recent German pilot suicide.

Autism and Sleep

By John Cline Ph.D. on March 31, 2015 in Sleepless in America
Parents of children with autism often report sleep difficulties for themselves and their children. Research over the past decade has given information about the sleep difficulties faced by these children. Problems falling and staying asleep, having negative attitudes toward and fears related to sleep are significantly more common among these children.

5 Ingredients of an Extraordinary Ordinary Life

Extraordinary people exist within even the most ordinary lives. They are the ones with the knack for living genuinely and who inspire us to attempt the same.

Music Therapy Activities Wiki

Learn more about music therapy, the value of music therapists and how music therapists envision and develop music therapy strategies. MusicTherapyActivities.Wikia.com is an encyclopedic collection of therapeutic music activities, indexed by goal and objective-- and it will help you understand more about the range of this dynamic approach to health.

Language

Language represents a huge developmental leap. Think of all the things we can accomplish with our words and language. We can enhance relationships with our children. We can share feelings and ideas.

The Adjustment of Adoptees

By A Guest Blogger on March 31, 2015 in Brainstorm
Does the emotional, behavioral and academic adjustment of adopted children differ from that of non-adopted children? New research sheds light on the differences—and similarities—between both groups.

Don't Give Up on the Difficult Patient

By Allen J Frances M.D. on March 31, 2015 in DSM5 in Distress
The most difficult patients often eventually form the deepest relationships and have the most satisfying outcomes. We are most important and make the biggest difference in the lives of the people who need us most, even if the day to day is not always smooth. With redirection, what was once the power to destroy can now become the power to heal and create.

Mental Health Screening Wouldn't Have Saved Germanwings 9525

By Jean Kim M.D. on March 30, 2015 in Culture Shrink
Screening must balance concerns of rare high-risk cases versus the vast majority of functional people with mental illness trying to overcome stigma and judgment

Can We Reverse Cognitive Decline?

By Katherine Bouton on March 30, 2015 in What I Hear
Good brain health is the bottom line. Now we just have to figure out how to preserve that health in those with hearing loss.

Advocacy or Privacy?

By Liza Long on March 30, 2015 in The Accidental Advocate
Is it oversharing to talk about your child's mental illness? What if your child has cancer?

The Backlash Against Psychiatric Diagnoses

Only in mental health does there exist the idea that we should avoid diagnostic terms if the cause of the suffering is great. This well-intentioned but misguided effort only alienates people further.

Say ‘No’ to the Fiction of Brain Diseases

During my lifetime I have witnessed the fall of Freudian psychiatry and the ascension of molecular psychiatry. Unfortunately, we have gone from the frying pan into the fire. We need to restore psychiatry where it belongs. The psychotherapy of character is an art and a science that bridges the old divide between psychotherapy and the brain.

After the Germanwings Crash, 7 Lessons About Mental Illness

By Carrie Barron M.D. on March 30, 2015 in The Creativity Cure
Not all depressions are alike. Severe depression with psychotic features may elude a clinician as they are well masked or not present at the time of the exam. Symptoms ebb and flow, troubled people can be high functioning and we have much to uncover about the conditions of the Germanwings co-pilot.

A Better Way to Prevent Rampage Killings

By Izzy Kalman on March 30, 2015 in Resilience to Bullying
To protect their children from a student who wrote a violent novel that describes how he kills them, parents at Tidwell Middle School are demonstrating to have him expelled from school. If anything, their demonstrations may be helping to create a monster and putting their children in greater danger. There is a better way to for these parents to demonstrate.

Suicide or Mass Murder? : The Deliberate Downing of Flt 9525

By Stephen A Diamond Ph.D. on March 29, 2015 in Evil Deeds
What motivates suicidal mass killings like the deliberate downing of Germanwings Flt. 9525?

Fear the Future

By James Sherlock on March 29, 2015 in Ape Expectations
In our modern world, anxiety is a burden to many. In our past, however, it may have been the difference between life and death.

Murder in a Locked Room:

By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on March 29, 2015 in A Swim in Denial
In a paradox worthy of Greek tragedy, the fortified cockpit door to Germanwings Flight 9525 invited the mass murder it was meant to prevent. Can we make sense of a co-pilot’s rampage?

Misdiagnosis of Bipolar Disorder, Part II

A case study illustrating comorbidity and distinctions between bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder and attention deficit disorder.

One Pilot’s Suicide Prompts a Call for Common Sense

By Julie K Hersh on March 29, 2015 in Struck By Living
The Germanwings crash causes a new look at regulations for pilots. Do current FAA regulations cause pilots to hide depression and bipolar disease, resulting in more severe illness?

Techniques to Manage Your Procrastination: Part II

Techniques to Manage Your Procrastination: Part II. 8 tips sure to work if you don’t put off using them. Part I of this post is Procrastination: Why You Do It. By Jane Burka, Ph.D. and Lenora Yuen, Ph,D.

Suicide and the Criminal

In the news as this blog is written is a "mass murder" of 149 passengers and suicide committed by an airplane pilot.

From “wow” to “meh” – 8 ways to deal with any letdown

By F. Diane Barth L.C.S.W. on March 28, 2015 in Off the Couch
Has this happened to you? You love everything about your new job – your terrific boss, your fabulous co-workers and your first assignment. Even your little cubicle is in the perfect location, with a bit of sunlight from a nearby window and near all of the right people. And then, sometimes all of a sudden, sometimes just bit-by-bit, you start to feel less excited.

Are We Losing Our Need for Physical Touch?

By Ray Williams on March 28, 2015 in Wired for Success
Has our hi-tech, media-socialized world lost something critical to our species—non-sexual human physical touch? Hasn't human physical contact set us apart from other animals, and has helped us develop complex language, culture, thinking and emotional expression?

Changing the ‘No Casserole’ Response to Mental Illness

A mother of two who is active in the International Bipolar Foundation shared a story the other day. When her youngest daughter was diagnosed with diabetes, friends called, sent cards and flowers, brought food, and posted encouraging Facebook messages.

Dr. Frieda Fromm-Reichmann: Creativity in Psychotherapy

Treatment of psychotic patients is very difficult and many practitioners believe that it is impossible to employ psychotherapy ef with such patients. Frieda Fromm-Reichmann was a courageous and creative therapist who extended and improved treatment in dramatic and sustaining ways. Her work has been a model for all mental health practitioners treating severely ill patients.

A Corporate Push to End the Stigma of Mental Illness

By Sigurd Ackerman M.D. on March 27, 2015 in Shrink Tales
A new era of corporate acknowledgment of, and support for, mental health would give a dramatic boost to how we address mental illness in America.

It’s Complicated: Ten Years After

By A Guest Blogger on March 27, 2015 in Brainstorm
Grief is a fickle and complicated lifelong journey that can assault its victims with debilitating symptoms at any time after its origin. Understanding that grief knows no time limit can ease the path toward acceptance.

Did Copilot Andreas Lubitz Conceal His Illness?

Many patients with severe, melancholic depression dissimulate and pretend that everything is fine so that family and caregivers will not block their suicidal plans. This danger of dissimulation in severe depression is something that psychiatrists have always known about.

What Makes You Say You’re Lonely?

By Peter Toohey on March 26, 2015 in Annals of the Emotions
What does it mean to be lonely and how do say that you are lonely? Is language enough to describe it? Are you lonely just because you think you are lonely and say you are lonely? Or are specific circumstances required for there to be loneliness? What does loneliness mean for the animal and human brain? Is loneliness and the word “loneliness” common to all cultures?

Precision Medicine’s Cultural Limits

"Everyone is different." This is the fundamental tenant of Precision Medicine: to utilize this difference to improve outcome. Real life is more complicated, and there is a lot that is not yet worked out before this approach will yield benefits.