Essential Reads

Understanding the Islamic State - A Fool's Errand?

The quest to understand the "validity" of a religious sect will be unsatisfying.

Can Law Improve People's Lives?

It certainly can, and it should. Here is a starting point.

Do Generations Exist?

Are generations caricatures or are they drivers of social and cultural change?

How Technology is Tricking You Into Tipping More

Digital payment systems use subtle tactics to increase tips. Here's how...

Recent Posts on Politics

How Youth Wind Up Taking Antipsychotic Medications

Yes, the number of kids taking antipsychotic medications is rising, but what does that mean? A new study begins to illuminate the process being the prescriptions.

Are Canadian Voters Really This Dumb?

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on March 01, 2015 in Caveman Politics
One of the nonpolitical shortcuts people use when evaluating politicians is their nonverbal displays—the messages they send with their facial expressions, body movement, eye contact, voice, and touch. How much does style matter over substance in politics?

Gangs: Protecting Today’s Youth - Part Two

Many youth who join gangs are looking for a family because they are lacking one at home. A gang is not a family, nor will it ever replace one. A little acceptance, love, compassion, and support can go a long way in deterring youth gang involvement.

Understanding the Islamic State - A Fool's Errand?

By Frank T McAndrew Ph.D. on February 28, 2015 in Out of the Ooze
Attempts to identify the beliefs that define the "validity" of any religion are doomed to fail because of our own cognitive biases and the nature of religion itself.

Blaming the Victim

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 28, 2015 in Memory Medic
"What did we do to make them hate us so much?"

Where’s The Market For Organs (And Sex)?

By Jesse Marczyk on February 28, 2015 in Pop Psych
Sometimes you aren't allowed to sell things that you are free to give away; a curious bit of moral psychology

How (Not) to Win the War on Terrorism

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
How can we protect society against a few committed radicals who can disrupt society by marshaling powerful communications networks? In the good old days, we tracked the movement of physical assets as early warning signs of trouble. What can we do now, when weapons are intangible and untraceable? Might it be possible to mobilize the mainstream as a balancing force?

The Blue/Black White/Gold Dress Controversy: No One Is Right

By David Kyle Johnson Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in A Logical Take
The blue/black, or white/gold, dress controversy reveals more than meets the eye.

They Talk, We Listen

By G.A. Bradshaw Ph.D., Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Bear in Mind
"I don’t know what happened, my Sweet Girl is gone. Yesterday she left in the morning and didn’t even say good-bye. She just left. I waited all day yesterday and she never came home, and today she’s still not home. I am really, really sad. I don’t even know what I am going to do with myself."

Can Law Improve People's Lives?

Can law make people's lives better? The answer is yes, and treating mental illness more effectively is one place to start.

The Psychological Antidote – Part II

By Ran Zilca on February 26, 2015 in Confessions of a Techie
If today we choose to show others how similar we are to them instead of how different, we may prove their dehumazing thoughts wrong, break the vicious cycle of dehumanization, and prevent tomorrow’s violence by creating a situation that reduces the motivation for conflict.

Do Generations Exist?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Is it misleading to speak about a self-absorbed “Me Generation” or jaded, cynical GenXers, overeducated and underemployed?

How to Encourage Non-Liberal Students in Psychology

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Rabble Rouser
How do you encourage non-liberal students to pursue careers in the social sciences? It is simple. Stop being hostile to them and their ideas. What a shock. If one creates an environment safe and supportive for all students, regardless of their politics, non-left students become interested in psychology.

How Technology is Tricking You Into Tipping More

By Nir Eyal on February 23, 2015 in Automatic You
Digital payment systems use subtle tactics to increase tips, and while it’s certainly good for hard-working service workers, it may not be so good for your wallet. Here's the hidden psychology of why you unconsciously pay more.

Banking Reform Comes Through the Back Door

By Ken Eisold Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Hidden Motives
​After many high profile failures to reform banking, thwarted by the power of the banking lobby, including efforts to break up banks “too big to fail,” it now seems that a simple and obvious rule has made a significant difference.

How Mass Murder and Serial Murder Differ

By Scott A. Bonn Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Wicked Deeds
A mass murder often occurs when the perpetrator, who may be deeply troubled, strikes out in a blitz-like attack. Unlike serial killers, mass murderers are often killed at the scene of the crime. They do not plan to escape and kill another day like their serial killer counterparts who are addicted to murder.

Live as if You’ll Die Tomorrow—Write a Will Today

By Cortney S. Warren Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Naked Truth
Writing a will is not something most of us think about. Or talk about. Or want to think or talk about. Because writing one reminds us that we are all going to die. Yet, until we find the scientific fountain of youth, death is inevitable. If you want any control over what happens to your belongings and dependents (such as your children and pets), write a will today.

What’s Behind Women’s Intuition?

By Audrey Nelson Ph.D. on February 22, 2015 in He Speaks, She Speaks
The ability to decode nonverbal cues is ultimately valuable and essential for effective communication. So women must ask themselves, how can we use these skills to enhance our effectiveness instead of letting them divert us? Women must not focus on others for a definition of what is “normal” or acceptable behavior; they must define it for themselves.

Discovering Peace of Mind

By Leon Pomeroy Ph.D. on February 22, 2015 in Beyond Good and Evil
I became the person I always wanted to be

Who Was George Washington?

By Gregg Henriques on February 22, 2015 in Theory of Knowledge
An analysis of George Washington's character and relational strivings on what would have been his 283rd birthday.

Fear and Loathing in Ferguson

Is the crisis in Ferguson, Missouri another illustration of our Borderline Society?

How To Solve The Diversity Problem

By Katerina Bezrukova Ph.D. on February 21, 2015 in Team Spirit
Can tolerance between different religious groups and races be increased or is it just something “we have to live with?”

The Jews Are Going Extinct

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on February 21, 2015 in How To Do Life
Why that’s bad, why it’s coming, and how to stop it.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Renamed

This month, the Institute of Medicine gave CFS a new moniker. Read on to learn more.

“Islamic Extremism” vs “Violent Extremism”

Some refuse to use the term "Islamic Extremists" to describe the terrorist group, ISIS, calling them "Violent Extremists." By attributing cause and accountability, we are better able to define who they are, delineate their mission and goals, and derive solutions to stop them. Naming them DOES NOT blame, or indict non-violent Muslims - not guilt by religious association.

Your Health Care, America's Health Care, Today and Tomorrow

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on February 20, 2015 in How To Do Life
The Affordable Care Act/ObamaCare is already causing shortages. How can you cope? What should society do?

Socially-Strategic Welfare

By Jesse Marczyk on February 19, 2015 in Pop Psych
Cross-national differences in beliefs about welfare appear to be generated by the same underlying psychology. If you want to get people to agree on welfare, you need to get to them agree about the recipients.

Escaping Across the Border Through Art

By David Gussak Ph.D., ATR-BC on February 19, 2015 in Art on Trial
Often, women who are emigrating from Mexico—sometimes illegally—may be doing so to escape from violence and suffering. Sometimes, they escape towards it. This post examines how one art therapist, guest blogger Valentina Castro, uses art to help endure and heal from such pain.

Jealousy in Street Art

By Peter Toohey on February 19, 2015 in Annals of the Emotions
Does jealousy have a role in street art? Can it help to keep things fair?

Health Insurance—Insuring Insecurity

Corruption breeds cynicism—welcome to health insurance