Politics Essential Reads

Nonconformity Has Counter-Intuitive Benefits, Study Finds

By Christopher Bergland on August 22, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study reports that going along with a group—whose viewpoints you are diametrically opposed to—triggers a physiological threat response.

What Do You Hear? Clinton, Trump, and Their Predecessors

By Gregg R. Murray Ph.D. on August 21, 2016 in Caveman Politics
What do you hear Hillz and the Donald saying? Do the data say the same thing?

Trump´s Tweets and Twitter Psychology: You Talkin´ to Me?

Twitter is both public and personal. Facilitating interaction between political candidates and prospective voters creates synthetic intimacy which can translate into votes.

When You've Been Bad, Is it Enough to Say You're Sorry?

Regret may seem like a watered down version of an apology but, according to new research, honest feelings of regret will have more lasting effects on behavior.

Exercising Our Freedom and Intelligence: Part 8

By Michael Hogan Ph.D. on August 19, 2016 in In One Lifespan
The future is uncertain. There is little doubt about that. Scenario-based collective intelligence design may help us to shape the future, specifically, through our innovations.

Add a Dose of Skepticism to Whatever You Believe

A finely honed doubt is as beautiful as a deeply held belief.

Is It Offensive to Declare a Psychological Claim Wrong?

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on August 16, 2016 in Rabble Rouser
You might think that scientists just let the data speak. Instead, if what the data say is, "Your pet theory or claim is wrong," many scientists get very defensive and hostile.

Learning the New Language of Racism

Language influences how we feel and how we react to things. Language is the foundation of change. Rather than avoid and deny, we need to start learning.

In Politics, a Closed Mouth Gathers No Foot—or Free Press

Donald Trump is media accessible. Yet for positive press, the key is to appeal to the voting public through the likability and trustworthiness of the reporter, not the candidate.

The Social Psychology of Brexit

By Mark van Vugt Ph.D. on August 12, 2016 in Naturally Selected
How can social psychology contribute to understanding the consequences of Brexit for the European Union? Exit-voice-loyalty theory offers some suggestions and solutions.

Thriving in a Gig Economy

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 12, 2016 in How To Do Life
How to avoid it or do well in it.

The Logic Underlying Trump's Outrageous Comments

Trump phrases things in a way that gets through to his supporters, but leaves him almost immune from attack by his detractors.

How to Spot a Liar or Just Someone Trying to Avoid the Truth

How do you spot a liar? New research on exchanges hurled during political debates suggests you might start by looking not at the liar, but at everyone else.

The Battle of the Archetypes

By Moses Ma on August 07, 2016 in The Tao of Innovation
Using a modern slant on Jungian analysis, the masculine and feminine archetypes are at war – understanding group dynamics and collective psychology is how politicians win.

Harmonicas, Social Connections, and Politics

Research and experience indicate that live music experiences help with group emotional connectedness. Words not required.

4 Reasons to Give Someone a Second Chance

The idea of giving someone a second chance is central to the notion of forgiveness; new research shows how forgiving someone benefits both of you.
courtesy: Twitter

The Psychology of Our Post-Factual Presidential Election

By David Ropeik on August 01, 2016 in How Risky Is It, Really?
A foolish mistake by a campaign worker that got little attention reveals a lot about how seemingly irrational we can be when it comes to politics.

If the Anchor Likes You So Do I: Likability Is Electability

Why do we have positive or negative impressions of political candidates? The answer might be because of the way they were treated by journalists, especially those whom we trust.

Beyond Knee-Jerk Partisanship? Clinton, Trump, and Speeches

Numbers are in. And the morality and negativity of the Clinton and Trump nomination acceptance speeches are in the spotlight.

Suspicious Characters

We must be careful in marking individuals off as despicable, or in making ourselves comfortable with them by terms like “crazy” or “radicalized” or "depressed.”

Still Not With Her?

By Laurie Essig Ph.D. on July 31, 2016 in Social Studies
People who consider themselves feminists are still not getting behind Hillary Clinton. That might be because they're sexist. We all are.

Forecasting November

Does new research into how we think of others suggest a Trump bump or Clinton defeat?

Plato on Democracy, Tyranny, and the Ideal State

By Neel Burton M.D. on July 26, 2016 in Hide and Seek
What would Plato have to say about today’s democracies?

The Surprising Psychology of the Email Hack

All too often we hear of a public figure whose email was hacked. What they thought was private becomes grist for the media mill. How would you feel if someone targeted you?

What Explains Demographic Gaps? Simpson's Paradox

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on July 25, 2016 in Rabble Rouser
Racial, gender, and other gaps do not always reflect discrimination

The GOP, Convention Turn Taking, and the Primacy Effect

When voters watch competing messages during both conventions, political turn-taking can benefit the party who goes first. This is true even when controlling for partisan bias.

Did the GOP Unconventional Convention Change Your Vote?

In politics, the impact of an initial positive impression endures—even in the face of subsequent negative attacks. The GOP convention may particularly impact partisan voters.

How to Say What You Mean without Sounding Like You're Mean

In a time when opinions are key to almost any dialogue between people, you may wonder- what’s the best way to express yours? This simple approach will help you find your voice.

How to Make Political Conversations More Productive

Being able to talk together constructively is a small but mighty consolation in these troubling times.

Proactively Coping With Racism

For most people of color, it becomes increasingly impossible to escape the stress caused by the barrage of news coverage broadcasting the gruesome details of racial violence.