Essential Reads

How to Feel Better When You’re Feeling Bad

Buddhist-inspired wisdom for navigating difficult times.

8 Negative Attitudes of Chronically Unhappy People

8 Negative Thoughts of Chronically Unhappy People

“Islamic Extremism” vs “Violent Extremism”

Is naming, blaming? The pathological avoidance of naming enemies.

Moving Toward Compassion in the Psychological Sciences

Investigating commonalities in modalities

Recent Posts on Philosophy

What Is Your Life Goal? 5 Personal 'Bottom Lines'

Organizations measure their success based on measurable, “bottom line” variables. What about people? What are you striving for? What gives your life meaning? Here are personal bottom lines.

A Response to Sam Harris's Writings on Moral Truth Pt 2 of 3

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Cui Bono
In August of 2013, Sam Harris issued a challenge to refute the central thesis of his book, The Moral Landscape. This thesis is that "questions of morality and values must have right and wrong answers that fall within the purview of science." This is part 2 of a 3-part post explaining why I agree with everything in his book except the central thesis.

Worthy Proverbs and Silly Ones

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in How To Do Life
We’re affected by proverbs, aphorisms, and slogans…and not always for the good.

How to Feel Better When You’re Feeling Bad

When you feel down, discouraged or frustrated, Buddhist concepts and techniques can offer surprising relief. Here's some starter key ideas, and info on an accessible and engaging guide that can help you to learn more.

Not Allowed to Dance?

By Kimerer LaMothe Ph.D. on February 28, 2015 in What a Body Knows
It is always interesting to look back to those twists and turns in the path that have gotten you where you are. This week, I’ve done just that, prompted by some quality time with Yvonne Daniel’s thoughtful, thorough book, Dancing Wisdom: Embodied Knowledge in Haitian Vodou, Cuban Yoruba, and Bahian Candomble (2003).

Modern Intellectual History of Cognitive Sciences

By Sean X. Luo M.D., Ph.D. on February 28, 2015 in Hooked on Patterns
Did cognitive science come out of Einstein or Darwin?

Waldeslust - Joy of the Forest

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in One Among Many
Spending a little time in Nature can break the yoke of self-domestication and bring peace and happiness. Begin with a walk in the woods.

The Blue/Black White/Gold Dress Controversy: No One Is Right

By David Kyle Johnson Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in A Logical Take
The blue/black, or white/gold, dress controversy reveals more than meets the eye.

Should We Fan the Romantic Flame?

By Aaron Ben-Zeév Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in In the Name of Love
All human experiences, including romantic ones, can be boring. The remedy for boredom is often change and novelty. Should we then change our romantic partners in order to fan our romantic flames? Although change is indeed essential to emotional intensity, there are several types of changes, and emotional intensity is far from being the whole story when it comes to romance.

The Diamond Rule

By Mark Goulston M.D., F.A.P.A. on February 26, 2015 in Just Listen
You've heard of Golden Rule and maybe even the Platinum Rule. Announcing the Diamond Rule

How to Integrate Mindfulness Practices into the Classroom

By Azadeh Aalai Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in The First Impression
How may college students benefit if mindfulness practices are introduced into their classes?

Waldorf Schools: Are They Way Behind the Times?

By Maureen D Healy on February 24, 2015 in Creative Development
Are computers a must-have for today's tech savvy kids?

A Response to Sam Harris's Writings on Moral Truth Pt 1 of 3

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Cui Bono
In August of 2013, Sam Harris issued a challenge to refute, in 1,000 words or less, the central thesis of his book, The Moral Landscape. This thesis is that "questions of morality and values must have right and wrong answers that fall within the purview of science." In a three-part blog post, I explain why I agree with everything in his book except the central thesis.

The 'Journey' of Psychotherapy

The “Journey” of Psychotherapy: On a voyage with an eating disordered patient. By Hilary Maddux, LCSW

Serenity: 6 Steps to Peace in the Midst of Change

By Rita Watson MPH on February 22, 2015 in With Love and Gratitude
Keep yourself and your relationship on an even keel and when change comes about -- second guessing will not shatter your peace. .

Discovering Peace of Mind

By Leon Pomeroy Ph.D. on February 22, 2015 in Beyond Good and Evil
I became the person I always wanted to be

8 Negative Attitudes of Chronically Unhappy People

All of us experience negative thoughts from time to time. How we manage our negative attitudes can make the difference between confidence versus fear, hope versus despair, mastery versus victimhood, and victory versus defeat. Here are eight negative attitudes of chronically unhappy people...

“Islamic Extremism” vs “Violent Extremism”

Some refuse to use the term "Islamic Extremists" to describe the terrorist group, ISIS, calling them "Violent Extremists." By attributing cause and accountability, we are better able to define who they are, delineate their mission and goals, and derive solutions to stop them. Naming them DOES NOT blame, or indict non-violent Muslims - not guilt by religious association.

Jealousy in Street Art

By Peter Toohey on February 19, 2015 in Annals of the Emotions
Does jealousy have a role in street art? Can it help to keep things fair?

Moving Toward Compassion in the Psychological Sciences

By Steven C. Hayes Ph.D. on February 17, 2015 in Get Out of Your Mind
We practice a kind of hypocrisy in the behavioral health area that’s not only embarrassing but counterproductive.

Does Yoga Give You Mental Agility, and If Not, What Would?

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on February 16, 2015 in Ambigamy
Yoga provides great physical agility but not great mental agility. Still, it is a great model for how to cultivate mental agility.

No, God Does Not Bless America

By David Niose on February 15, 2015 in Our Humanity, Naturally
Atheists are pushing back against schools defining patriotism with God-belief.

Listening to Sinewave Speech Almost Turns You Into a Psychic

There is no doubt that it feels differently to listen to a language you know and a language you don't know. But can that kind of knowledge influence the sounds we hear?

The Risks of Not Choosing to Vaccinate

A number of parents make the decision not to vaccinate their children. While parents clearly have the right to choose the kinds of medical care for their children, are the risks for other children and, indeed, the world worth it? The key question is the balance between individual rights and what is in the best interests of society.

The Catch-Phrase Technique

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on February 11, 2015 in A Sideways View
People often won't tell you what really motivates them. Many can't tell you because they do not have insight into their motives. Over the years, psychologist have tried to invent simple and efficient techniques that assess what people really think. One such is the catch-phrase technique.

When, if Ever, Is It Okay to Lie to Your Partner?

There are benefits and risks to lying in a relationship. You may want to protect your partner by telling a white lie, but if you’re found out, your partner will feel betrayed. New research provides guidelines on how to handle the truth in your closest relationship.

The Celestine Prophecy

By The Book Brigade on February 10, 2015 in The Author Speaks
We all start off as nonbelievers, says James Redfield. But if we open ourselves to the spirituality just below the surface of our everyday challenges, interesting things start to happen. We become more intuitive. And we get luckier.

Plato Said Knock You Out

How martial arts cultivates character and challenges the mind.