Philosophy Essential Reads

Keeping Track

By Jean Kazez on August 16, 2017 in The Philosophical Parent
Is it ethical to use Find-My-iPhone to track your kids?

Why Should We Care What the Victorians Thought of Self-Harm?

Forget what you thought you knew about self-harm. History suggests our attitudes are more culturally determined than we might think.

What is the Fascination With the Upcoming Solar Eclipse?

By Lori Russell-Chapin Ph.D. on August 13, 2017 in Brain Waves
How might this solar eclipse help us in the understanding of ourselves and our shadow?

Two Mistakes About the Meaning of Life

Wrong views inhibit people from realizing meaning in their lives.

I Love Him Most of the Time

Lively’s claim that she loves Reynolds most of the time runs counter to the nature of profound love. She probably desires him sexually most of the time, but loves him all the time.

Seeing the Sky as a Copernican

We are not naturally inclined to perceive the world in conformity with even our most familiar and well-learned scientific commitments.

The Psychiatric Scapegoating of Michelle Carter

The woman convicted in the texting-suicide case is guilty of no crime.

What Is a Meaningful Life?

Many consider life not to be meaningful enough. But reasons they present for this view are often problematic.

Yearning for the Romantic Road Not Taken

In “The Road Not Taken,” Frost refers to “the road less traveled” and “the road not taken.” Are the two notions identical? How does this distinction relate to the romantic realm?

The Hubris of Neuroscience

Pop neuroscience represents a reductionistic misapplication of knowledge, ignores differences between persons, and negates explanations of human conduct in terms of free will.

Should We Have Children?

By Neel Burton M.D. on July 23, 2017 in Hide and Seek
This fundamental question raises profound ethical issues.

Mental Illness as Strategy: Game Theory and Psychiatry

Mental illness--like depression, anxiety, and even schizophrenia--is a game, a strategy, invented by the player (often without acknowledgment) to achieve some end, or "payoff."

Being Bayesian in Insane Places

Can we really make progress in improving reliability of detecting problematic psychiatric events using computational tools?

The Question of Contact

By David Kyle Johnson Ph.D. on July 10, 2017 in Plato on Pop
Can personal experience ever be used to justifiably override scientific evidence or argument?

How Do We Handle Religion in Mental Health Settings?

By Jean Kim M.D. on June 27, 2017 in Culture Shrink
What is the best way to handle a client's religious views if they differ from your own?

Differences Between Self-Directed and Progressive Education

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on June 27, 2017 in Freedom to Learn
Self-Directed Education and progressive education both emphasize the education of the whole, unique person, but they differ greatly in how that education is best achieved.

In Pursuit of Happiness: Why Pain Helps Us Feel Pleasure

By Brock Bastian Ph.D. on June 22, 2017 in The Other Side
Is happiness just about the good times? Do painful experiences only make us unhappy? Here is new research on why our painful experiences are in fact necessary for happiness.

Free Speech and Thought on Campus

Whatever one's views are concerning politics, ethics, and religion, we should engage in discussion, dialogue, and debate about these issues.
stockfreeimages /14114118/Harbor-at-Sunset purchased on free trial

Globalization and Work: Have We Learned Anything Yet?

Free trade raises GDP but has its losers as well as its winners. It’s time to exchange the “winners could compensate losers” slogan for a “winners must compensate losers” policy.

Study Shows a Bias for Evidence of What We Want to Be True

New experimental findings suggest that we seek and stress corroborating evidence based on what we desire.

Does Google Know Your True Self?

Does your online behavior give a more accurate picture of you than your offline behavior? A new book raises some philosophical puzzles about the "true self."

The Law of Attraction

By David Dillard-Wright Ph.D. on June 07, 2017 in Boundless
Is the Law of Attraction nonsense? Perhaps it holds a grain of truth.
Eric Jannazzo PhD

How Am I Doing at Life?

Our culture's gamification of life has led to an epidemic anxiety, ever-buzzing though often just beyond our consciousness.

How to Teach Kids Right From Wrong

By Katherine Hawley Ph.D. on June 05, 2017 in Trust
How to help kids tackle tricky situations.

A Periodic Table of Behavior for Psychology

The Tree of Knowledge System provides psychologists (and scientists in general) with a new Periodic Table of Behavior.

Psychology of Peak Performance, Continued

By David Dillard-Wright Ph.D. on June 02, 2017 in Boundless
Endurance athletes teach lessons about mental toughness for everyone.

Consciousness and Information

Our conscious experience contains and depends upon many different kinds of information. What is the relationship between how information is processed and conscious awareness?
Eduard Kurzbauer / The Dispute / Walters Art Museum / Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

A Question That Good Critical Thinkers Ask, Part 1

If I were to tell you that reading this article will make you a better critical thinker, what question would a good critical thinker ask about my claim?

“Only You” or “I've Two Lovers, and I Love Them Both"?

Emotional partiality and diversity are essential to romantic love. However, they appear to conflict with each other. Which one has a greater romantic value?

Stop Looking for Yourself

By Svend Brinkmann Ph.D. on May 05, 2017 in Stand Firm
Those who reject the whole find-and-develop-yourself ideology have more chance of putting down roots and living a life with a certain degree of integrity.