Essential Reads

Getting Existential with Josh Rouse

Musician Uses Mindfulness to Manage Anxiety

The Brain Is Wider Than the Sky

What Emily Dickinson Can Teach Neuroscience

The Key To Diagnosing Narcissism Diagnosers

Just what's behind our obsession with how to diagnose narcissists?

The Ghost in the Machine

What makes you who you are?

Recent Posts on Philosophy

Ex Machina: Oedipus Ex?

By Ravi Chandra M.D. on April 23, 2015 in The Pacific Heart
Ex Machina opens wide this weekend. What does it mean to us to create life technologically? What does it say about our fears and hopes? Thoughts on Ex Machina and Her.

Is Your Cell Phone Conscious? On Information Integration

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on April 23, 2015 in Hot Thought
The theory that consciousness is just information integration suffers from vagueness, mathematical problems, naïve claims about self-evidence, and misattribution of consciousness to entities such as smartphones.So it is less plausible than alternate theories that explain consciousness as the result of brain mechanisms.

The Brevity of Time

You would think that awareness of our common fate – the knowledge that we are all ‘in the same boat’…. in that we all, individually, die – would induce some small, however slight, sense of our common ‘humanness’ across the world’s nations and cultures.

Moral Motivation and God's Rewards

What humans' moral intuitions suggest about the relative merits of religious versus secular accounts of moral motivation.

Will You Be Openly Secular?

By David Niose on April 19, 2015 in Our Humanity, Naturally
Openly Secular Day aims to encourage nonbelievers to be open about their personal secularity.

My Journey to Figuring Out How to Live Life

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on April 18, 2015 in How To Do Life
Thoughts on the life well-led and the meaning of life.

What We Choose to Believe - The Power of Belief

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on April 17, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
Why are we more tolerant of our own fallibility than that of machines that operate on probabilities (algorithms)? What does this say about our confidence in science and scientific evidence? Does the entrepreneurial mindset offer a different perspective on how we learn and grow?

Getting Existential with Josh Rouse

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 17, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Josh Rouse shares how he has been able to conquer anxiety through mindfulness.

What Makes Us Tick?

They met in a airport because of a book that one of them was reading, the same the other had recently read. The conversation was so stimulating that they decided to continue it online and share it with their readers. They both believe this will be the first of an endless series of talks about the subject—what makes people tick—that tickles them the most.

The Brain Is Wider Than the Sky

Neuroscientists often quote Emily Dickinson's poem that begins, "The brain is wider than the sky," in support of their view that the mind is nothing but the brain. But they interpret the poem too narrowly, and miss its deeper meaning. Her poetry can teach us about the brain and mind, in ways that neuroscience can't.

Why Your Next Vacation Should Be Nowhere

By Gregory Ciotti on April 14, 2015 in Habits, Not Hacks
The value of stillness.

10 Things I Didn't Know About Jackie Robinson

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on April 14, 2015 in Black Belt Brain
No matter how his life is viewed or evaluated, Jackie Robinson had and continues to have a beneficial and tangible impact on baseball, society, and beyond.

Heisenberg Capacitor

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on April 13, 2015 in One Among Many
Here’s Part III of my effort to strike a blow for hedonism by nullifying Nozick’s experience machine. Reality as it is is good enough. Enjoy it.

Breaking Good

By Adi Jaffe Ph.D. on April 13, 2015 in All About Addiction
Coming face to face with your own shame and emotion about the past can be hard. This is me trying to do it in public.

The Experience Machine Reloaded

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on April 12, 2015 in One Among Many
In a famous thought experiment, philosopher Robert Nozick tried to refute hedonism, or the idea that pleasure is the best and pain is the worst. But not so fast, please.

Holding a Grudge Produces Cortisol and Diminishes Oxytocin

Are you currently holding a grudge against someone? Is someone holding a grudge against you? This blog post offers scientific reasons and some basic advice on how-to let go of a grudge and move on with your life.

The Key To Diagnosing Narcissism Diagnosers

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on April 10, 2015 in Ambigamy
Psychology Today's most popular articles are about how to diagnose narcissists. What drives our interest? Here are some factors to consider.

Happinesses

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on April 10, 2015 in One Among Many
I found 26 blog posts on happiness in my blog archive. Here’s a list of them with a brief statement of contents for each. Peace and happiness!

Time to SPRING Into a Diet and Keep the Weight Off

As if tax time weren't enough to cause appetite loss....

Yoga as Medicine for Depression

According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, 58 percent of those who practice yoga do so for mental and physical well-being, and 16 percent use yoga to treat specific conditions.

The Difference Between Assault and Battery

By Ruth Sarah Lee J.D. on April 09, 2015 in So Sue Me
Assault and battery are two legal terms that are almost always used together. But is there a difference between "assault" and "battery"? As it turns out, one is physical; the other psychological.

Big Love

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on April 09, 2015 in In Excess
Macrophilia appears to be an increasingly popular sexual paraphilia in which individuals derive sexual arousal from a fascination with giants and/or a sexual fantasy involving giants. But what do we know about it from a psychological perspective?

Can There Be Too Much Romantic Sensitivity?

Sensitivity is often praised as one of the most important pillars of a good romantic relationship. Although this is indeed the case, too much romantic sensitivity can overburden a relationship. How then can we find the optimal balance of sensitivity in the complex romantic realm?

John Joseph Shows Us Why Healthy Living Is Pure Hardcore

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 08, 2015 in Brick by Brick
The Cro-Mags' John Joseph shows us that coping with difficult situations can be hard, but healthy living is the ultimate strategy.

The Monk Chat from Thailand

Sitting with a young monk in Chiang Mai yields eons of wisdom on what holds us back from life and ourselves and what to do about it.

When Is Suicide Acceptable?

By Joe Pierre M.D. on April 06, 2015 in Psych Unseen
Although suicide is taboo in the U.S., euthanasia is gaining increasing acceptance. A look at other forms of culturally sanctioned suicide reveals the moral relativism of taking one's life and suggest clues for suicide prevention.

Getting Enlightened About Prostitution

This year marked the 25th anniversary of the movie “Pretty Woman” starring Julia Roberts and Richard Gere. It was a movie I loved at the time because I really knew so little about prostitution—"the life" that Roberts' character was a part of. Then, I had no opinion about prostitution.

Want To Be A Hero? Embrace Suffering and Sacrifice

The wisdom gleaned from theology and psychology reveals six ways that suffering and sacrifice are beneficial to human beings.

A Response to Sam Harris's Writings on Moral Truth Pt 3 of 3

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on April 04, 2015 in Cui Bono
In August of 2013, Sam Harris issued a challenge to refute, in 1,000 words or less, the central thesis of his book, The Moral Landscape. This thesis is that "questions of morality and values must have right and wrong answers that fall within the purview of science." In a three-part blog post, I explain why I agree with everything in his book except the central thesis.

How Do You Feel if You Can't Read?

By Peter Toohey on April 03, 2015 in Annals of the Emotions
Real literacy rates in advanced economies are lower than you might expect. This reduces the accessibility of digital technology for many people whose literacy is not strong. The common claims that the Digital Revolution is changing the way people experience emotions – such as loneliness, love, jealousy, boredom - may need to be treated with considerable caution.