Essential Reads

The Benefits of Embracing the Ordinary

Why you should take the time to capture the mundane in your everyday life

Teenagers Are From Earth

Pathologizing adolescence doesn't do us any favors.

Work-Life Balance is Dead

Here's why we should aim for work-life integration instead

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

Parents and grandparents of boys, take heart: Their time has come.

Recent Posts on Parenting

Why You Should be More Grateful

By Neel Burton M.D. on March 01, 2015 in Hide and Seek
Despite its many benefits, gratitude is hard to cultivate.

Gangs: Protecting Today’s Youth - Part Two

Many youth who join gangs are looking for a family because they are lacking one at home. A gang is not a family, nor will it ever replace one. A little acceptance, love, compassion, and support can go a long way in deterring youth gang involvement.

The Effect of Napping on Toddlers’ Nighttime Sleep

By Dennis Rosen M.D. on March 01, 2015 in Sleeping Angels
A recent review of 26 different studies on how napping during the day effect the sleep of toddlers at night found that there is, indeed, a connection between the two.

One Man’s Sorrow, Enlightened by Grief

By Nancy Berns Ph.D. on February 28, 2015 in Freedom to Grieve
Paul said he was surprised by his grief: “I don't think that I had any inkling that I had any depth or capacity for that much grief. It just took me by surprise.”

Not Allowed to Dance?

By Kimerer LaMothe Ph.D. on February 28, 2015 in What a Body Knows
It is always interesting to look back to those twists and turns in the path that have gotten you where you are. This week, I’ve done just that, prompted by some quality time with Yvonne Daniel’s thoughtful, thorough book, Dancing Wisdom: Embodied Knowledge in Haitian Vodou, Cuban Yoruba, and Bahian Candomble (2003).

ADHD and Early Death: A False Assumption

By Claudia M Gold M.D. on February 28, 2015 in Child in Mind
Space and time to listen to the story are critical to effective treatment of problems of regulation of attention, behavior and emotion. Perhaps the risk of early death in individuals diagnosed with ADHD lies in the absence of recognition and treatment of complex underlying causes.

Gangs: Protecting Today’s Youth - Part One

Gangs are a problem plaguing our nation. While trends show a steady decrease from the past, gangs are still prevalent in many communities throughout the U.S. Unfortunately, many gangs lure susceptible youth into their ranks leading them down a path of criminal activity, drugs and ultimately destruction.

Where’s The Market For Organs (And Sex)?

By Jesse Marczyk on February 28, 2015 in Pop Psych
Sometimes you aren't allowed to sell things that you are free to give away; a curious bit of moral psychology

How (Not) to Win the War on Terrorism

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
How can we protect society against a few committed radicals who can disrupt society by marshaling powerful communications networks? In the good old days, we tracked the movement of physical assets as early warning signs of trouble. What can we do now, when weapons are intangible and untraceable? Might it be possible to mobilize the mainstream as a balancing force?

What Sex Teaches Us About Leadership

Paying attention to sex can make you a better leader

Are Friends Really Worth That Much?

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Creating in Flow
Have you ever reflected on the role of female friends in your own life? Do you maintain lifelong friendships? If not, do you wish you could?

Winning Moves in "Searching for Bobby Fischer"

By Skip Dine Young Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Movies and the Mind
"Searching for Bobby Fischer" is a movie about greatness in chess. But more than that, it is about maintaining compassion as one pursues excellence. It is also a caution to parents who may be tempted to overly identify with their children's success.

Intimate Partner Abuse: Walk Away Before the Cycle Starts

We should never live in fear of the people who say they love us.

Schizophrenia and Violence, Part II

By Betsy Seifter Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in After the Diagnosis
The insanity defense fails again, but mentally ill offenders need treatment, not punishment.

Sexting and Selfies

Sexting and intimate selfies have become almost routine-but should they be?

The Paradox of Modern Adulthood

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Less secure, less stable, more anxious, yet better nonetheless.

Is Declining Ability With Aging Inevitable?

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Black Belt Brain
There’s an inevitable decline in ability across the lifespan, or so we’ve been told. This idea that we have to deteriorate as we age has had widespread and pervasive traction in our society. But is it true?

Study Finds Habits in Children Take Root by Age 9

By Rebecca Jackson on February 26, 2015 in School of Thought
The research is eye-opening for many parents who hope their children will eventually take on more responsibility. The evidence is clear; it's not happening without intervention. This article examines the new research and provides parents with an updated guide of age age appropriate responsibilities to build self-sufficiency and resilience in children.

Peer Pressure Affects Actions More Than Recommendations

By Art Markman Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
As a parent, I am often confronted with the hypocrisy of advice-giving. There are plenty of things I have recommended to my kids that are courses of action that I have not taken myself. Some of that is that I want my kids to avoid some of the mistakes I have made. But, some of it is also that the way you give advice differs from the way you decide what to do yourself.

Not Just High Achievers

By Hilary Levey Friedman Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Playing to Win
How can we understand the impressive performances on Child Genius? It's more than just brains, it's also achievement patterns.

A Mother's Love: Myths, Misconceptions, and Truths

By Peg Streep on February 26, 2015 in Tech Support
Commonly held ideas about motherhood shape the dialogue we have culturally, get in the way of understanding parent-child conflict, and affect each of us individually by setting a high and sometimes impossible standard. Why it's time to banish some of the myths that animate the discussion and start a new conversation.

"Falling" Into Crime?

Crime is a matter of choice.

Crime-aversaries

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
This week, the anniversaries of two arrests remind us of the shocking reverberations of murder in ordinary communities.

Having a Baby: When You Don't Agree

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on February 26, 2015 in Fixing Families
Being on different pages about having children can be a major relationship roadblock. The key is uncovering the problem under the problem -- some likely suspects.

Do Generations Exist?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Is it misleading to speak about a self-absorbed “Me Generation” or jaded, cynical GenXers, overeducated and underemployed?

Are Kids Curious?

By Glenn C. Altschuler Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in This Is America
In The Hungry Mind, Engel draws on the latest social science research to understand why curiosity is nearly universal in babies, and less evident in school. Although most children learn more when their curiosity is piqued, “schools do not always, or even often, foster curiosity.” But in an era that prizes quantifiable results, curiosity is not likely to be a priority.

Some Things Get Better With Age

By F. Diane Barth L.C.S.W. on February 26, 2015 in Off the Couch
My ninety year old aunt complains that she does not have much energy anymore. She doesn’t like it that she can’t remember what day it is, or the names of new acquaintances. But when it comes to emotional advice, there’s no one better to ask. Research has shown that as we age, not all of our cognitive abilities are on a steady downward path.

Envisioning the Future for Your Child with Autism

By Chantal Sicile-Kira on February 25, 2015 in The Autism Advocate
When envisioning the future of your child as an adult – any child – it’s important to focus on the strengths that are apparent. And as the parent of a child with autism, it’s even more important. The strengths your child has will help him overcome his deficits, perhaps even become a way for your child to be employed as an adult, or be motivated to learn new skills.

3 Reasons Your Kids Won't Take "No" For An Answer

By Erica Reischer Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in What Great Parents Do
The surprising truth about why your kids won't take "no" for an answer and what to do about it

Stop Hating Yourself Once and For All

By Lisa Firestone Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in Compassion Matters
Throughout a given day, we experience a barrage of sadistic thoughts so smoothly and so frequently that we hardly notice we’re under attack. We may try to compensate for insecurities, but deep down, we are our own worst enemy. So, what causes us to turn against ourselves and how can we stop?