Essential Reads

Should I Let My Kid Play Football?

By Michael W. Austin Ph.D. on February 10, 2016 in Ethics for Everyone
Parents whose kids want to play football should consider the other ways in which their kids might get its benefits without incurring the risk of serious harm.

Boredom and Its Perks

By Dena Kouremetis on February 09, 2016 in The Unedited Offspring
You may never know how creative your kid is until she's bored stiff.

Sisters Choosing Him for Themselves

By Robert Burriss Ph.D. on February 09, 2016 in Attraction, Evolved
Research shows that women value physical attractiveness more when choosing a partner for themselves than for a sister.

Why It's So Important to Banter With Young Children

By Erin Leyba LCSW, Ph.D. on February 08, 2016 in Joyful Parenting
Banter, or informal and spontaneous chatting, joking, and storytelling, builds a foundation for knowledge, skills, and relationships.

More Posts on Parenting

Why and How to Practice Gratitude

Do you find yourself losing sight of what the holidays are all about? Check out these few tips on how to get back to practicing gratitude.

4 Steps to Prevent a Bad Divorce

By Wendy Paris on November 24, 2015 Splitopia
While we've all heard horror stories of expensive, nasty divorces, there are steps we can take to help ensure our own break-up does not follow that model.

9 Signs Your Child Has Entitlement Issues

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on November 23, 2015 Singletons
If you are an overly involved or protective parent, you probably feed your child’s sense of entitlement. Learn how to turn the tide.

Will Your Child Be Part of the Collateral Damage of Divorce?

Rather than looking at the negative consequences of divorce as fixed, we need to examine the origins of the problem – the so-called pathogenesis – to recognize that these consequences are the results of symptoms acquired over the course of a child’s lifetime.

Want Your Kids to Start Listening to You? Stop Doing This!

A new, healthier way of looking at discipline.

Going Screenfree: Sheer Madness or Sheer Genius?

Whether a parent senses screen-time is having a negative impact on a child or simply feels there's way too much of it, constantly managing electronics use can drive parents crazy. Here are three tips to help parents go from thinking "something needs to change" to taking decisive action.

The Unparented Child

Wrong child/wrong parent: how to heal a mismatch and champion your neglected inner child

Why Are Media Beauty Ideals Toxic for Our Daughters?

It is important for parents to know that there is a direct relationship between the amount of time that girls spend viewing media images and whether or not they will have negative body image. And we know that negative body image is related to many other problems like low self-esteem, depression, excessive dieting, and eating disorders. Some practical strategies to try.

Teaching Tolerance in a Time of Terror

It may seem easy to counteract chaos and unrest resulting from terrorist attacks by pointing fingers at entire groups. We need to be clear about what such stances communicate especially to our children.

Rethinking John B. Watson's Legacy

Should Watson be taught to students as a cautionary tale? In tracing his research, it becomes clear that in addition to ethically questionable studies, Watson was promoting problematic and dangerous assertions regarding child rearing without legitimate support for any of his claims.

Best Interests of the Child: Standards & Parental Alienation

Best Interest of the Child Standards do not protect children from parental alienation.

The Surprising, Undeniable Power of Touch

By Lydia Denworth on November 19, 2015 Brain Waves
What's in a mother's caress? A set of specialized nerve fibers may help to explain why holding babies builds attachment.

Parental Pressure Takes a Toll on Young Athletes

Emphasizing whether a child wins or loses in a sport harms self-esteem.

The New Date Night: Dinner and...Therapy?

With date nights occurring so rarely, many couples want to take advantage of their limited time together. They may want to talk, but forget how. Therapy can provide a safe, sympathetic and constructive environment where couples can express their wants and needs within a relationship, relieving the expectation to tackle each issue while they are in a more social setting.

Teen Sexting vs. Child Pornography

The simple truth is teen sexting is relatively common — a fact that really shouldn’t surprise anyone. I mean, weren’t we all teenagers once upon a time, with raging hormones and bad ideas and weird thoughts about what is and isn’t appropriate sexual behavior?

How to Help Our Children Deal With the Terror of Terrorism

For all children, regardless of age, parents must offer support and reassurance in the wake of the terror of terrorism.

Letting Go of Fear of Failure-Part IV

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on November 17, 2015 The Power of Prime
Fear of failure is about the perceptions that you hold about failure and, for the vast majority of people, those perceptions are entirely disconnected from the reality of their lives. You perceive that bad things will happen if you fail, but the reality is that nothing particularly bad, aside from some disappointment, will likely result from a failure.

Should We Let Kids Study What Interests Them?

By Garth Sundem on November 17, 2015 Brain Trust
Does a child's intrinsic motivation increase math scores? Of course it does! That is, unless you look at the science.

How to Persuade Defiant Teens Without Aggression

Certain types of beliefs promote or hinder access to solution-focused thinking, and a commitment to a non-aggression principle is a belief that promotes greater access to peaceful and effective solutions during conflicts.

Terror on the Tube: Background Television & Little Ones

By Jamie Krenn Ph.D. on November 16, 2015 Screen Time
Recently, Paris came under attack to a horrific set of events. While most young children are not sitting down to watch the evening news, a fair set of households do keep television news on in the background. Encourage children to talk about what they have viewed either in the foreground or the background can help.

Some Parenting Practices With Your Adolescent to Consider

The approaches parents use to stay meaningfully and influentially connected to their adolescent are numerous, and necessarily so in a relationship that never stops growing in complexity.

Your Child's Brain on Books

By Elaine Reese Ph.D. on November 14, 2015 Tell Me a Story
Reading books to young children is an everyday activity in many households. New research offers clues on how picturebook reading is important for your child's brain development.

Fathers and Daughters

By Nick Luxmoore on November 14, 2015 Young People Up Close
Growing older, daughters need their fathers differently.

When 12 Feels Like 20

Kids today are growing up faster than ever before. Perhaps the greatest irony is that while our kids seem more mature, earlier, many of us strive to remain young. 40 is the new 30 and 50 is the new 40. At the rate our tweens are growing up and we're trying to stay young, you have to figure that we'll seem the same age as our kids in no time.

Do Parents Make Their Children Fat?

Research suggests that it’s not just unhealthy food choices that are putting the pounds on our children; parenting style also has a significant impact on childhood obesity.

How My Daughter with RAD Dealt with Death

By Tina Traster on November 13, 2015 Against All Odds
A mother of a RAD child witnesses her child's reaction to death

How to Find a PA Expert, Part 4

How you can tell if a parental alienation "expert" is a true expert?

Protecting Your Kids (and Yourself) Online

Ideally, whether intended to protect kids or contain adults, parental control software will stop many online problems from happening. That said, these products do not guarantee smooth sailing. In reality, even the best software can’t stop everything. Plus, a persistent and tech-savvy user (of any age) can nearly always find ways to circumvent both the filtering and the acc

The Twice-Exceptional Adult

Although the word “gifted” has been used to describe children of higher levels of intelligence for decades, the term twice-exceptional, often abbreviated as "2e", has only recently entered the lexicon of educators, mental health professionals and others referring to intellectually gifted children. AND NOW this term is being applied to adults, too.

Is Mental Health Care Failing our Kids?

A recent New York Times essay is an eye-opening message for parents or for anyone else concerned with child mental health.