Essential Reads

Parental Guilt: The Dilemma

Who is minding the children when both parents work?

Single Mothers and Their Health, Around the World

Single parenting causes poor health? 6 ways you were misled

The Surprising News about Children's Mental Health

New research suggest today’s kids are in pretty good psychological shape

What Happens When the Whole Family Plays with Food?

“Family therapy can be helpful; family dinner is transformative.”

Recent Posts on Parenting

9 Important Technology Rules for Children

The unhealthy relationship children have with technology is a mounting epidemic with uncharted consequences. These nine steps below will help keep your family balanced amidst this technology-addicted world.

Prime Your Child’s Reading & Math Development with Patterns

Patterning refers to the meaningful process of organizing, coding, and categorizing information in the brain. It is through the patterns constructed and stored in neural networks that our brains recognize and find relevance in the millions of bits of sensory input received every second. Your child’s early experiences sorting, categorizing and patterning are key.

Ten Steps Toward Parenting for Happy Productivity

Accomplishment, achievement, and recognition are good goals for our children, but being loving and happily productive on one’s own terms are better. For my children and grandchildren, what delights me more than any prizes the world might offer is a confident integrity; a radiant inner light; a life lived with love, kindness, courage, happy productivity, and appreciation.

Encouraging the Best From Your Child

Parents have so many worries, but by instituting some proactive strategies for positive reinforcement they may be able to affect healthy outcomes in their children.

Which Parent Do You Love More?

Parents are told not to favor one child in the family, but there are no rules that govern how children ought to feel about parents. One theory of family relationships can help provide perspective on this surprisingly under-researched area.

Mindfulness, Little League, and Parenting

How much of our parenting time do we spend taking children to ball games, dropping them, and then waiting for the action to begin? And then once the so-called action begins, how much actually happens? The answers, at least until children get older, are an awful lot and not much. It’s all fun and games and bonding together, except when it isn’t.

Choosing to Be Child-free

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in A Sideways View
More and more people in the west are choosing not to have children. Is this a puzzle for evolutionary psychologists? What does the research say on this topic?

Do the “Eyes” Have It?

When we have our face in our phone how do we listen to someone next to us?

Please Let Me Act out on My Sugar Addiction in Peace

By Anna David on April 21, 2015 in After Party Chat
Those who consider themselves sugar addicts but then quit never tire of lecturing other sugar consumers about the dangers of that white powder. Why can't they just let us leave us alone with our cookies?

Homework: An Hour a Day Is All the Experts Say

How much time does your teen spend doing busy school work each night? According to a recent study, if it's more than one hour…then it's too much.

My Student Wants a Romantic Relationship

Romance, teachers, and students don't mix.

What Seinfeld Understood About Motivation and Psychology

By Jonathan Fader Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in The New You
There aren’t many life lessons that haven’t been covered in Seinfeld: in the show’s nine year run it covered difficult parents, relationships, alternate-side parking, muffin tops, shower pressure, and the ethics of double dipping—to name a few. But Jerry Seinfeld, the real person, had another life lesson to offer off the air to one aspiring comic.

You Can't Fix Everything

I’m much more at peace since I stopped trying to fix everyone’s life, including my own. It’s making it easier to take those unfixable moments in stride and to appreciate happiness and joy when they happen to come my way.

Why I Can't..... or Why Can't I?

Our beliefs and thoughts impact our lives more than any relationship.It would be wise to evaluate how we came to them and whether they truly serve us.

Are Athletes Good Role Models?

Being a sport superstar doesn’t automatically qualify a person to be a role model. What are the credentials for the job?

As A Nation, How Can We Best Empower Our Gifted Kids?

Should your child move ahead to that advanced math class? Should they skip a grade? Should they enter college early? What impact will that have on their educational and social/emotional trajectory? What does the research evidence tell us?

Developmental Dislike of Parents During Early Adolescence

One function of adolescence is to grow parent and adolescent apart. Dislike of parents is part of what allows this social separation to occur. Most important for parents to remember is that this loss of liking for parents does not mean any lessening of of adolescent love.

Reducing Your Stress From A Challenging Child

Managing your emotional health is crucial for parenting a difficult child.

I'm Having An Impossible Time With A Break-Up

Breaking Up in The Age of Social Media

Why You Lied to Your Parents (and What They Really Knew)

Respecting children's boundaries while staying strict and engaged is the best way to encourage them to share information and to keep them from lying.

Motor Activity Improves Working Memory in Children with ADHD

A new study suggests that a majority of students with ADHD could perform better on classroom work, tests, and homework if they were allowed to sit on activity balls or exercise bikes while learning.

Fear of Intimacy and Closeness in Relationships

By Hal Shorey Ph.D. on April 18, 2015 in The Freedom to Change
Being in a relationship with someone who shuts down emotionally when times get tough is no fun. It’s also no fun to try your best only to have others accuse you of not being emotionally available. Learning where these avoidant personality styles come from can help you cope more effectively with stress in your relationships and have a more rewarding experience.

Meaningfully Salient Parenting

Meaningfully salient parenting can be spoken about, but, in essence, it is a deeply heartfelt and intimate engagement between parent and child, mother and father, and all within the family system.

A serialistion of my book “Cancer Is My Teacher” – Part 1

By Lucy O'Donnell on April 18, 2015 in Cancer Is a Teacher
Do you ever have a niggling feeling that something isn't right medically? Are you chronically tired for no reason? Has your Doctor often ignored these complaints and put it down to the stress of modern day living? Well, if this resonates with you, then read on. You could save your life.

When Your Personal, Private Choices Enrage Others

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on April 18, 2015 in Living Single
Why do perfect strangers react to some of our most personal choices with anger and attempts to stigmatize us for them? "Otherhood" author Melanie Notkin, historian Elaine Tyler May, environmentalist Bill McKibben, "Childless by Choice" project director Laura S. Scott, and I share our thoughts about the matter.

Why Do Rich Kids Have Higher Standardized Test Scores?

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University recently reported that the academic “achievement gap” on standardized tests between lower-income and higher-income children is reflected in brain anatomy.

The Art and Science of Haggling

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 18, 2015 in A Sideways View
Often the most popular skills based courses are those on negotiation. They teach among other things the gentle but very important arts of haggling and persuasion: in short how to get a good deal. Why is it so important and what is the fundamental psychology of haggling?

What Causes You Inner Turmoil?

Being in heated conflict not with others but with yourself can—let’s face it—be agonizing. To be split down the middle, to endlessly waver between two (and sometimes more) options, can at its worst be almost unimaginably distressing. Obsessive to an extreme, it can lead to a paralysis of will (not to mention, much lost sleep). . . .

6 Tips for Managing Life With a Control Freak

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on April 17, 2015 in Fixing Families
It's difficult to live with someone who is always controlling in a variety of ways. Some tips for not taking it personally and for changing the dynamics.

The Voice Inside Your Head

We all carry a voice inside our head. What if your internal voice is doing you no good; how do you change it?