Essential Reads

One More Reason to Unplug Before Bedtime

Reading a bedtime story improves a child's brain function and mental imagery.

10 Ways to Stay Connected with Your Adolescent

The challenge of parenting a teenager is staying connected as you grow apart

How I'm Using Science to Help My Daughter Keep Liking Math

Priming studies show uphill battle for girls and math, and how to help

The Grass Moment

We Need to Help Kids Become "Reflective Rebels"

Recent Posts on Parenting

The Secret to Friendship - Revealed!

By Kira Asatryan on April 10, 2015 in The Art of Closeness
What makes friendships so much easier than romantic and family relationships? The secret may surprise you!

The Baby Share

By Sharon Praissman on April 10, 2015 in Beyond the Egg Timer
Babies are born into families and communities. Although it can be anxiety inducing, allowing others to hold your baby benefits you, your baby, and the baby's fan club.

Are We Medicating the True Selves of Boys?

We seem to be asking boys to conform to a standard of behavior that in the past would have been more appropriate for girls.

Who's to Blame?

By Paul Gionfriddo on April 10, 2015 in Finding Tim
The right question isn’t “what more could I have done for my child?” It’s “what can we all do for all our children?” We need to start by identifying and addressing their needs early, and not pitting parents, clinical professionals, and educators against one other. We begin by standing together, not falling apart.

Alienated Grandparents

Alienated grandparents suffer tremendous loss and emotional suffering.

End Game

Skills employers say they're looking for can be learned by working at camp.

5 Reasons Studies Say You Have to Choose Your Friends Wisely

While it makes sense to befriend people you come in contact with regularly—like neighbors and co-workers—research shows the importance of being selective about who's in your social circle.

Should Elective Surgery Be Delayed for Very Young Children?

Accumulating evidence supports the possibility that general anesthetics have adverse effects on brain development in very young children. A recent New England Journal of Medicine editorial suggests that parents and doctors consider the risks and benefits of delaying elective surgery until children are 3 years old or older.

Let’s Play: How the Science of the Brain Is Changing Therapy

I recently attended a conference at UCLA entitled: Play, Creativity, Mindfulness and Neuroscience in Psychotherapy. The conference offered an approach that has been gaining increasing importance, namely that: “Throughout the lifespan, play supports neurological growth and development while building complex, skilled, flexible, responsive and socially adept brains."

The Best of Times or the Worst of Times for Marriage?

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on April 10, 2015 in Living Single
Fewer people are marrying than ever before, as claims about the power of marriage—for adults, for children, and for society—intensify. How accurate are those claims? What are the implications of offering more incentives to people to get married and more benefits and protections once they do?

Do Sleep Issues in Teens Predict Drug and Alcohol Problems?

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on April 09, 2015 in Sleep Newzzz
Despite their seemingly boundless energy—and propensity to stay up late at night—teens need more sleep than adults.

The Freedom to Enjoy Secure Functioning

By Stan Tatkin Psy.D. on April 09, 2015 in The Puzzle of Love
Psychological principles underlie the current political debate over same-sex unions. Like all couples, same-sex couples have a better chance to thrive in an environment that supports their ability to form a secure-functioning relationship.

The Making of a Murderer

From poverty to riches, serial killers to gang members, behind almost every violent person, there is a story of despair. Not every trauma creates a killer, but most killers are created from trauma.

Bullying: A Case Study Revisited

They delighted in their own cleverness, and in their ability to get many uninvolved bystanders to sing a chorus as they waited in the food line. In other words, the humiliation of one girl became a popular bonding experience, and ad-libbing new lyrics was a way to get positive peer attention.

Jealousy, Simple and Complex

Simple jealousy functions in many adult relationships as a kind of distance-regulator. When the partners drift apart, the pang of jealousy motivates more attention and connecting behavior.

You Want Couple’s Counseling But Your Partner Does Not

By Suzanne Gelb Ph.D., J.D. on April 08, 2015 in All Grown Up
“Should I still come to counseling to work on my relationship if my partner won’t come? Maybe I should just give up. We’re doomed, right?” I hear this type of question quite often. It’s unfortunate, but often the partner who really needs counseling refuses to show up. Still, my answer to anyone wondering, “Should I get counseling even if my partner won't come?" is... Yes.

Finally, An Online Group For Kids With a Borderline Parent!

By Randi Kreger on April 08, 2015 in Stop Walking on Eggshells
Kids need support for the puzzling things going on in their life. Until now, there was nowhere to go to have a borderline parent. Now, thanks to the Personality Disorders Awareness Network, there are place they can go.

How to Fix Any Problem: The 3 Step Approach

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on April 08, 2015 in Fixing Families
While the content of the problems we are forced to deal with every day constantly changes, the basic approach we need to put the problem to rest is always the same. Here are the three steps.

Just Boy Banter or Tween Mean?

Tween boys are particularly prone to running in packs, complete with alpha and beta males. Similar to the queen bee who likes to hold court, alpha males are known to challenge and test the betas who surround them. There is of course a difference between playful teasing and bullying.

5 Ways to Be More Authentic on Social Media

By Alice Boyes Ph.D. on April 08, 2015 in In Practice
In psychology, the term “impression management” is used to describe how we go about selecting how we present ourselves publicly. Most of us can relate to the idea of having two competing drives: (A) to display our best self (B) to be genuine, and keep it real. Here are five tips for how you can both create a positive impression AND be authentic on social media.

When You Feel Like a Hot Mess

Ever feel that you were a hot mess? I guess that’s the new way of saying, “I think I’m having a nervous breakdown.” All around you Murphy’s law is in full force, and you are honestly having a hard time believing that so much could go wrong so quickly. This year could only be better, right? But you’re still having a hard time.

The Epidemic of Insecurity

The stressors in your life adversely impact your self-esteem and trigger insecurities. Because you cannot avoid them, learn how to negate them. These steps will help you combat your insecurities and strengthen your confidence in you own worth and abilities.

Evidence? We Don't Need No Stinkin' Evidence!

By Alfie Kohn on April 07, 2015 in The Homework Myth
It's possible to prove that rewards and punishments aren't effective in the long run. But what if defenses of these practices are rooted more in ideology than psychology?

Can a Narcissist Ever Change?

We tend to associate narcissism with psychological problems that impact a variety of everyday behaviors and relationships. However, according to a new theory of narcissism, one of the three basic types has the chance to grow up psychologically healthy.

Uncontested Divorce Can Improve a Relationship

By Wendy Paris on April 07, 2015 in Splitopia
New legal processes can improve a relationhip on the other side of marriage. Some of the most exciting innovations in divorce are coming from the legal professionals.

Everything Ends Up as Pornography

By Steve Albrecht DBA on April 07, 2015 in The Act of Violence
Internet access to pornography is negatively reshaping dating relationships Millennials have with each other.

What’s Hiding Under Pollyanna’s Smile?

By Elizabeth Wagele on April 07, 2015 in The Career Within You
Some Enneagram types value appearing positive more than others do. Many of us 5-Observers challenge the prevailing opinion or look at the negative side while searching for more information. Many introverts and some 5s, 4-Romantics, 8-Asserters and counter-phobic 6-Questioners dislike overly-optimistic language as it seems automatic and insincere.

How Parent-Child Relations Have Changed

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on April 07, 2015 in The Prime of Life
The parent-child bond in the twenty-first century.

Failing Our Fathers

Many studies of fatherhood leave out nonresidential fathers, particularly those of lower educational and financial backgrounds. A new book by Ronald Mincy and colleagues offers rich insight into the challenges faced by U.S. economically vulnerable nonresidential fathers.