Essential Reads

Why So Many Young Adults Are Living With Their Parents

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on May 26, 2016 in Living Single
For the first time ever, more young adults are living with their parents than with a spouse or partner. One of the most interesting reasons for this is rarely mentioned.

The Infant “Crying It Out” Debate: Chapter 615

A new Australian study looks at two different infant sleep interventions and whether they work or cause damage.

Can You See Yourself as Good Only by Seeing Yourself as Bad?

All children need—and desperately—to establish a secure bond with their caretakers. After all, absent such a vital connection, how can they not feel anxious and apprehensive?
Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

5 Top Parenting Challenges and How to Deal with Them

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on May 24, 2016 in Singletons
Tweaking how you respond to tantrums or aggression, whining or back talk can put an end to power struggles and create loving, lasting bonds with your children.

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How to Survive Mother’s Day When Your Mother Is Gone

By Deborah Carr Ph.D. on May 05, 2016 in Bouncing Back
Mother's Day is hard when you don't have a mom. Here are ways to find strength and even joy on this bittersweet day.

If Your Mother Was Grieving, Could You Become Her Caretaker?

What would you do if you suddenly found that you had to care for a depressed and grieving parent?

Parents and Digital Technology

By The Book Brigade on May 05, 2016 in The Author Speaks
Stop lecturing your kids on the dangers of screen time. Lead by example: Fix your own habits first.

RUSH Prevention Program Helping Children of Bipolar Parents

Children may be more sensitive to stress in their environment.

For Dogs It's "Of Course I'll Obey — If You're Watching Me!"

Studies show that how well dogs obey their owner's instructions depends upon how much attention they're receiving from their owner. The same is true for kids and their parents.

How to Avoid Shaming Your Child

If these interactions are repeated throughout childhood, the shame can become toxic; the beginning of a fear of being defective that can shadow us through life.

The Trauma of Emotionally Toxic Parenting

By Anneli Rufus on May 04, 2016 in Stuck
Verbally abusive parents can cause lifelong trauma.

James Gottstein on Psychiatry and Your Legal Rights

The future of mental health interview series continues with James Gottstein on psychiatry and your legal rights.

Narcissist's Adult Child: A Painful Role

If a narcissistic parent feels threatened, they can go from extreme adoration to devaluation in moments.
iclipart.com, used with permission

Let's Pretend You're Sick

The psyche of parents who fake their child's illness

Growing Pains: The Parental Kind

The fear of a child making mistakes is often more about the parent’s ego than the child’s growth.
Wavebreak Media Ltd/BigStock

Have We Learned to Ignore Emotional Abuse?

Emotional abuse is like the parable—pervasive, self-perpetuating, and so common that everyone can relate to it. In fact, that’s part of the problem: it is so common.

The Cop Visit Taught Me a Lesson

By Tina Traster on May 02, 2016 in Against All Odds
With RAD children, the rules don't always apply. Telling Julia to call the police was a joke, but it backfired.

Test Anxiety

While it is normal to feel some dreaded apprehension about taking an exam, test anxiety takes emotions to a whole new extreme.

12 Simple Ways to Teach Mindfulness to Kids

Want to teach your children to be more mindful? Here's how.

The Gift of Listening to Our Mothers

We may think we our doing our mothers a favor by listening to them, but the gift is ours.

What Is Passion? Part 2

By Lybi Ma on May 02, 2016 in Brainstorm
Guest Post by Angela Duckworth, Ph.D.

4 Stunning Things Thank-Yous Do for a Partnership

This one "booster shot" helps partners stay happier & more satisfied, stay together longer, and protects from the negative effects of arguments. So why is it so hard to keep up?
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Helping Your Adolescent Manage Increased Emotional Intensity

An important avenue of self-management education in adolescence is learning how to manage emotions so that they serve the teenager well, and not badly. Parents can be of help.

Early Maternal Love and Support Boosts Child's Brain Growth

New research suggests that a child's brain is particularly sensitive to maternal love and support during the preschool years. A lack of nurturing can stunt brain development.

How to Get a Great Education for You and Your Child

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on May 02, 2016 in How To Do Life
Choosing the right schools and making the most of them.

Bring It On! 8 Reasons Some Kids Thrive Despite Adversities

A groundbreaking new study has pinpointed 8 factors that promote flourishing in kids who face multiple "adverse childhood experiences."
123RF.com

Does Your Marriage Need Help? Send Out a May Day Call!

Anyone who’s ever pondered the demise of a marriage knows that even when money, time and energy are no object, splitting up a family is a very hard thing to do.You may not have to.

In Celebration of Mothering

Mothering is essential for babies. In fact, we know now more than ever that the child’s body and brain are "the result of mothering and being mothered.”

Reflections and repairs for Mother's Day

Having a difficult mother need not mean that Mother's Day is a washout. Here's how we can use it to shore up our soul.

Helping Your Child Cope With a Death

Sharing information in a supportive way, will lower his anxiety.

When Food is Love

For my mother, cooking was never a service; it was the deepest, purest act of love.

4 Great Starter Phrases to use When Venting to Your Partner

Simple conversation starters can make all the difference between "dumping" on your partner and securing their support.

Is Your Cell Phone Your Best Friend?

Is your cell phone your best friend? How to avoid becoming the tool of your tools.

Creating Boundaries with Your Adult Child

Are you overwhelmed, stressed out, and racked with guilt in trying to decide how to best help your adult child?