Parenting Essential Reads

Living With a Control Freak? Some Sanity Tips

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on April 17, 2015 in Fixing Families
It's difficult to live with someone who is always controlling in a variety of ways. Some tips for not taking it personally and for changing the dynamics.

Getting Existential with Josh Rouse

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 17, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Josh Rouse shares how he has been able to conquer anxiety through mindfulness.

Breakup: How to Tell If You Suffer from Complicated Grief

Sometimes it is impossible to let go of grief. When you continue to grieve a loss, your condition is called complicated grief. Complicated grief is so severe that psychiatrists now consider it for inclusion in the psychiatric manual for diagnosing mental disorders. Here is how to tell if you suffer from complicated grief.

Parental Warmth: Simple, Powerful, and Often Challenging

Amidst all the chatter about parenting styles and techniques, it is easy to forget about the importance of warmth. This overlooked dimension is found to be critical to child development in study after study, so why don’t we give it the attention it deserves?

Redditor to Redditor

Young men are finding new ways to reach out to each other and older generations for advice and mentorship.

What to Do When Your Life Takes an Unexpected Turn

As you make your way through life, you are guided by both the long- and short-term goals you’ve set for yourself. However, your plans may take an unexpected turn. From research on “career shocks,” you can learn to manage the unexpectedly good and bad that life throws your way whether in your career or your relationships.

The Emotional "Trials" of Trial Independence (ages 18 - 23)

For many last stage adolescents (18 - 23) independence can prove too much of a good thing when they flounder in so much freedom, become stressed out, and experience emotional crisis as a result. At this juncture, parents can be of help.

Working Moms Have Healthier, More Successful Kids

Though we spend more time with our kids these days than decades ago, it may not be improving their developmental outcomes. A study of family time diaries shows that family income is a better predictor of children's academic and psychological outcomes than the amount of individual attention they receive from their parents between the ages of 3 and 11.

Her Marriage, and His

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on April 11, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Why it is so hard to make a marriage last.

Meet Danielle Meitiv: Fighting for Her Kids’ Rights

By Peter Gray on April 11, 2015 in Freedom to Learn
Danielle and Alexander Meitiv have been giving their children some of the same freedom that they themselves enjoyed as children, in a world that is safer than the one in which they grew up. As a consequence, they have been visited by police, and the county Child Protective Services have threatened to take their children away. Here is my interview with Danielle.

5 Reasons Studies Say You Have to Choose Your Friends Wisely

While it makes sense to befriend people you come in contact with regularly—like neighbors and co-workers—research shows the importance of being selective about who's in your social circle.

Do Sleep Issues in Teens Predict Drug and Alcohol Problems?

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on April 09, 2015 in Sleep Newzzz
Despite their seemingly boundless energy—and propensity to stay up late at night—teens need more sleep than adults.

Uncontested Divorce Can Improve a Relationship

By Wendy Paris on April 07, 2015 in Splitopia
New legal processes can improve a relationhip on the other side of marriage. Some of the most exciting innovations in divorce are coming from the legal professionals.

Failing Our Fathers

Many studies of fatherhood leave out nonresidential fathers, particularly those of lower educational and financial backgrounds. A new book by Ronald Mincy and colleagues offers rich insight into the challenges faced by U.S. economically vulnerable nonresidential fathers.

Adolescence and Making Parents Proud

While the attached child tends to be happy to make parents proud, the detached adolescent can be more ambivalent about being a source of parental pride.

What Are the Most Important 10 Years of Your Life?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on April 04, 2015 in The Prime of Life
The ten years from eighteen to twenty-eight are the pivotal decade in a person’s life.

Should We Call it Postpartum Depression?

For reasons that are both straightforward and extremely complex, I just think the terminology should be different.

The Flynn Effect as Adaptive Change

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on April 01, 2015 in The Human Beast
All living creatures can change to fit in with their environment. Some of that flexibility is due to gene selection but a lot is developmental. The Flynn effect of rising IQ in developed countries is an enrichment effect of modern life. It arises due to the adaptive response of our brain to the increased challenges it faces.

Does It Really Matter Where You Go to College?

If you want to be a leader in society, where you go to school probably matters. A good college, after all, might increase the likelihood of your success. When parents worry about which school their kids go to, they may be acting quite rationally.

The Adjustment of Adoptees

By A Guest Blogger on March 31, 2015 in The Guest Room
Does the emotional, behavioral and academic adjustment of adopted children differ from that of non-adopted children? New research sheds light on the differences—and similarities—between both groups.

7 Ways to Combat Facebook Jealousy

By Andrea Bonior Ph.D. on March 31, 2015 in Friendship 2.0
Many of us are trapped in a cycle of seeking out social media almost automatically when we're bored or stressed. Sometimes, though, it can do more harm than good—especially if it spurs on jealousy. Here are seven ways to break free.

Socioeconomic Factors Impact a Child's Brain Structure

In the largest study of its kind, a team of investigators from nine different universities have identified a correlative link between family income and a child’s brain structure.

Adoption in the Life of Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs' adoption provided an environment that helped him become the co-founder and major influence of Apple Computers, but his genetic inheritance was also crucial.

Protective Parenting an Adolescent

With all the media attention devoted to adolescents getting in trouble, getting hurt, and getting killed, it's hard for parents not to worry about their teenager and to act restrictively in her or her defense. However, the best protection parents can provide is self-management preparation for safely functioning in a hazardous world.

The Benefits of Embracing the Ordinary

By Amie M. Gordon PhD on March 27, 2015 in Between You and Me
What would you rather do, write down the last conversation you had or watch a funny video? This is one question researchers asked in an effort to understand whether we underestimate the pleasure we get from recalling mundane events from our past. We don't want to record the last conversation we had, but in a month, we'd rather read about it than watch a funny video.

Teenagers Are From Earth

Our black-and-white thinking about adolescence is getting in our way.

Work-Life Balance is Dead

By Ron Friedman Ph.D. on March 27, 2015 in Glue
Technology has made work-life balance obsolete. Here's why we should aim for work-life integration instead.

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

For several years now a bipartisan group, which includes experts in the area of boys’ issues and fatherhood—and many of these are women, some of whom strongly identify as feminists—has been pushing for a White House Council on Boys and Men which would parallel the one that President Obama established for women and girls shortly after he took office in 2009.

Precision Medicine’s Cultural Limits

"Everyone is different." This is the fundamental tenant of Precision Medicine: to utilize this difference to improve outcome. Real life is more complicated, and there is a lot that is not yet worked out before this approach will yield benefits.

Unnaturally Good: The Plight of the Goody Two-Shoes

There’s authentic virtue, and then there’s a kind of chronic, not-quite-credible virtue that doesn’t—and can’t—reflect the individual’s true nature. Their righteous words and actions, though perceivable as virtuous, may not come from their heart but their head. And what they say may belie what they’re really thinking—may not, in essence, “capture” who they truly are.