Parenting Essential Reads

Waving Sadly and Yet Joyfully Goodbye

By Michael W Corrigan Ed.D. on September 01, 2015 in Kids Being Kids
My wife started back to work fulltime. After admirably serving seven years in the trenches of child warfare on the not so tropical resort island known as Imagonna Pullmyhairout, she joined the ranks of the millions who deserve to be awarded a “Stay at Home Mom” Medal of Honor. As a recovering Mr. Mom, this blog is dedicated to all of you Stay at Home Parents.

What If the Diagnosis of Autism Is Wrong?

How does this happen? There are many neuropsychologists who are excellent and take time to evaluate a child. Sometimes, children do not perform well because they are afraid of the unfamiliar adult or the testing tasks and environment. Sometimes, at a young age, particularly in cases of a language delay, the child doesn’t understand the intent of the question.

For the Sake of the Children

By Mel Schwartz L.C.S.W. on August 31, 2015 in A Shift of Mind
Many people in unhappy or conflicted marriages stay together for the purported sake of the children. This article examines this premise and explores what's really best for our children.

What We Like About Stories

By Jamie Zibulsky Ph.D. on August 26, 2015 in Book Smart
Two of the characteristics of stories that are most important to us as readers or audience members may seem contradictory: we like surprises, but we also like predictability. Children also value these same elements in books, even from a young age.

The Life-Changing Magic of Helping Kids Get Organized

By Wendy Paris on August 25, 2015 in Splitopia
Co-parenting in two homes can increase chaos. Help your kids develop organizational skills that will help them now and in the future.

What Does It Take to Succeed in Life?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on August 24, 2015 in Media Spotlight
A new paper published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology describes one of the most comprehensive studies to date looking at the effects of family background, personality, and intelligence on later success. By studying 81,000 participants over an eleven-year period, researchers found that the American Dream is still alive and well. More or less.

Conservative Feminism

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on August 19, 2015 in Rabble Rouser
If you want to be accepted by mainstream, contemporary feminism, you must identify as pro-choice, reject the reality of innate or biologically based gender differences or the concept of human nature, condemn traditional relationships and family dynamics, and subscribe to specific avenues for achieving gender equality and justice.

Do First Amendment Rights Apply to Students in School?

By Peter Gray on August 16, 2015 in Freedom to Learn
In this interview, conducted by guest blogger Alex Walker, the founder of Free Student Press, David Krane, explains that student free speech is legally protected by the first amendment, but students must fight for that protection. School officials typically do everything they can to prevent students from knowing about and exercising their constitutional rights.

The Collapse of Values and My Local Car Dealership

What an efficient group of employees! Then why do I feel so bad?

How to Stop Resenting Your Spouse

Before having kids, my husband and I hardly ever fought. But after my son arrived, we suddenly turned into one of those couples on the Maury Povich show, screaming into each other's face. Unfortunately (but reassuringly), this is normal. Researchers have found that relationship satisfaction takes a dive in the first five years of parenthood.

9 Ways To Improve Your Child’s Chances For Success

Many new parents may be too busy to realize it, but Tovah Klein of Columbia University argues that “the ages from two to five are crucial for your child’s long-term healthy development and success—for laying the foundation of who they will become over time.” Here are 9 ways to improve your child's chances for success from "the toddler whisperer."

How Detachment Changes Both Adolescent and Parents

Adolescence alters the child, the parent in response, and the relationship between them. Adolescence changes everyone.

Anger at Our Children

Your reaction to the child's behavior depends completely on how you feel about yourself.

The Underrated Importance of Being Playful

By Bernard L. De Koven on August 06, 2015 in On Having Fun
What if playfulness were a survival skill?

Is it the Baby Blues or Postpartum Depression?

It's natural to wonder if what you are feeling may be a symptom of something more serious. And considering 20 percent of women do experience postpartum depression or anxiety, it's also important to know when to seek professional help to feel better.

Before Blending Families, Consider All of This

By Wendy Paris on August 04, 2015 in Splitopia
Expecting your blended family to be one big Brady Bunch-like good time can lead to some serious disappointment. Psychologist Anne Brennan Malec recommends managing your expectations and taking steps to help all family members adjust.

Life and the Essence of Adolescence

By Daniel J. Siegel M.D. on August 03, 2015 in Inspire to Rewire
During a summer vacation on a lake in Wisconsin, I look at my son and daughter, my nieces and nephews, and soak it all in. Life is a passing of these moments, I know, ones we cannot hold onto. A startling discovery of exploring this important adolescent period of life is that the ESSENCE of adolescence is also the key way to keep our brains vital and growing.

WOSPs, the Amalfi Coast, and Unstructured Play in Children

By John Tauer Ph.D. on August 02, 2015 in Goal Posts
Why Can't Kids Play on Their Own?

A Quick, Easy Technique to Stop Yelling at Your Kids

If your kids have you climbing the walls, don't despair--just head for the ceiling to stop the yelling, power struggles, and drama. Here is how to do it!

Yet Another Reason Why It’s Good to Be a First-Born Child

By Mark Travers Ph.D. on July 31, 2015 in Social Instincts
New research finds that eldest siblings are better at picking up second languages.

Liar, Liar, Working Memory on Fire

Working Memory can make you a better liar, research shows

Stars, Bars, and Embryos

By Elliot Hosman J.D. on July 28, 2015 in Genetic Crossroads
The ideas of "choice" and "intent" have arisen in debates about both the confederate flag and prenatal genetic testing. But are these concepts insufficiently nuanced for these tough topics?

What Really Makes Narcissists Tick?

Among other things, narcissists typically come across as arrogant, manipulative, entitled, and woefully lacking in empathy. But if these defining features are understood at a deeper level—as powerful psychological defenses to protect them from experiencing a truly frightening vulnerability—a quite different picture of them emerges. . . .

What We Really Needed From Our Parents

When we reflect on our childhood we tend to recall the tough times -- times when we as kids screwed up, or when our parents failed. It turns out that the dance between love and hate, doing right and doing wrong, and above all making amends is critical for secure attachments. We learn to trust other, indeed, we learn to be moral as part of a normal developmental process.

What Helicopter Parents Need to Know

How can concerned parents help today's college students become healthier, more successful young adults?

Adolescence and the Allure of the Internet

Today's parents must raise children in two worlds, offline and online, and for adolescents freedom on the Internet has a powerful allure.

Baby Crying? Don't Shame the Parents!

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on July 26, 2015 in Moral Landscapes
A medical doctor, also a parent, wrote to me recently to complain about my blog post, "'Dangers of Crying it Out.'" Here is (most of) my response.

The Archeology of Misbehavior

Archeology is the study of human activity in the past. The archeology of misbehavior is studying current behavior to uncover hidden sources. The “ruins” of misdeeds are built upon personality architecture and cultural landscapes.

I May Be a Jackass, But I Can Be Taught to Care

A jackass is an ornery animal. You can lead it to water, but you can't make it drink. Are kids the same way?

The Power of Evolutionary Psychology

A good scientific discipline should provide tangible new findings about some phenomena. Evolutionary psychology consistently provides new insights into what it means to be human. Here are three of the biggies – things we simply would now know without evolutionary psychology.