Essential Reads

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

Parents and grandparents of boys, take heart: Their time has come.

Precision Medicine’s Cultural Limits

Even if we had an Oracle Chip, we'd still need doctors.

Unnaturally Good: The Plight of the Goody Two-Shoes

Don’t be fooled—not all virtue is the same.

Should You Make Choices for Your Kids?

Tuning in—or being tuned out

Recent Posts on Parenting

Letting Things Have a Life of Their Own

Turning people—turning all things—into projects is a very effective defense against allowing them to have a life of their own. Irrelationship provides a place for our attention to be focused instead of on our fear of real relationship, real intimacy. The conclusion to this brief case study provides an exemplar for how we can recover from the irrleational defense—together.

Violent Expression: Sign of Our Deep Need to Communicate?

By Seth Slater M.F.A. on March 26, 2015 in The Dolphin Divide
When notions of fair play are violated, our ability to speak helps keep the peace. We are capable of sudden, violent physical outbursts, but calm expressions of anger through language can keep us from resorting to brute force – sometimes.

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

For several years now a bipartisan group, which includes experts in the area of boys’ issues and fatherhood—and many of these are women, some of whom strongly identify as feminists—has been pushing for a White House Council on Boys and Men which would parallel the one that President Obama established for women and girls shortly after he took office in 2009.

Recovering From Seasonal Shifts in Mood in Bipolar Disorder

By Elizabeth Brondolo Ph.D. on March 26, 2015 in Take Control
For people who have bipolar disorder, seasonal changes in mood can disrupt your health and well being. You can learn to recognize and address these seasonal shifts before they cause harm. We examine the effects of these shifts on motivation, thinking and identity. Early recognition can help you gain better control of bipolar spectrum disorder.

Precision Medicine’s Cultural Limits

"Everyone is different." This is the fundamental tenant of Precision Medicine: to utilize this difference to improve outcome. Real life is more complicated, and there is a lot that is not yet worked out before this approach will yield benefits.

Anorexia and the Dangers of Blog Post Titles

By Emily T. Troscianko on March 26, 2015 in A Hunger Artist
Few topics induce stronger emotion than parenting and children’s illness, and where emotions are heightened miscommunication can easily occur. Here I try to clarify my mother’s original argument, respond to some readers’ comments which blur the crucial distinction between personal and scientific ‘findings’, and reflect on the role of choice in recovery from anorexia.

What No One Tells You About Avoidant Men

A subgroup of men with an avoidant attachment style suffer from a condition known as the Madonna-whore complex. Men with this complex assign Madonna status to some women and whore status to others.

4 Reasons Kids Stop Respecting Their Parents

Just telling kids their behavior is not okay is not enough

Unnaturally Good: The Plight of the Goody Two-Shoes

There’s authentic virtue, and then there’s a kind of chronic, not-quite-credible virtue that doesn’t—and can’t—reflect the individual’s true nature. Their righteous words and actions, though perceivable as virtuous, may not come from their heart but their head. And what they say may belie what they’re really thinking—may not, in essence, “capture” who they truly are.

Changing Our Perspectives on Mental Illness and Health

Addicts and those with co-occurring disorders such as depression, anxiety, or PTSD are frequently overwhelmed by shame. This is not just an internal issue of being ashamed of past behaviors.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Pregnancy Loss Etiquette

If approximately one million expectant parents per year experience a pregnancy loss, why do people struggle on how to act towards them? Most people are well intended and want to be supportive, but have no idea how to approach it.

What Parents Can’t Do

More than twice as many states required parental consent for mental health treatment than for substance abuse treatment.

Should Autism Be Diagnosed in Infancy?

By Claudia M Gold M.D. on March 25, 2015 in Child in Mind
Autism research is coming out from the shadows of the "refrigerator mother theory' to show the importance of working with parent and child together to promote healthy development

Are You on the Fence? 10 Questions to Help Set Yourself Free

By Peg Streep on March 25, 2015 in Tech Support
Are you someone who second-guesses every big decision to death? Do you find yourself unable to move one way or another? Here are some questions that can possibly help...

Should You Make Choices for Your Kids?

Parents need to be concerned about the choices their kids make. The quality of your presence and support as your child explores and sorts through the options establishes the basis for his and her confident and solid decision-making when he and she are on their own.

What to Consider When Adding to Your Four-Legged Family

Choosing a new canine companion can be daunting. Should you adopt a shelter pet or buy from a breeder? Would a puppy or adult dog be a better fit for your life style and family? In this blog Dr. Stepita discusses what to consider before bringing your next furry family member home.

The Quiet Advocate Behind Thriving Youth

All youth need supportive adult relationships beyond their parents—mentors who believe in them and their potential. Are you a mentor to young people? Learn how to foster their success.

March Madness

By Jeffrey Lieberman M.D. on March 24, 2015 in Shrink Speak
Students and parents rarely consider that they might need mental health services during college and often urgently. For this reason, they would be well advised to include the quality and availability of mental health services along with traditional considerations as they decide on the college of their choice.

How Drug Addiction Impacts Infant Care

By Molly S. Castelloe Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in The Me in We
Drug abuse short circuits neural connections between child and caregiver.

How to Override the Assumptions Others Make About You

Assumptions come in many varieties, but two of the most powerful and pervasive of these are confirmation bias and the primacy effect.

How Clinical Psychology Programs Get Wussified

Aren’t therapists supposed to be able to stomach strong emotion, confront conflict, keep calm, and carry on?

From A-Ha to Success and Beyond

By Kathy Cramer Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in Lead Positive
This is the story of retail innovator Maxine Clark and how she answered her Call to found Build-A-Bear, the teddy-bear themed retail-entertainment experience.

Part Two: Four Words that Get Buy-In

Here in part two, I’ll cover the next three words that can increase buy-in in even the most change resistant employees.

Good Negotiators Focus on Their Resources

By Art Markman Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
Life is full of negotiations. Buying a car involves reaching an agreement with a dealer about the sale price. Going out with friends on a Saturday night may trade off the movie your friends want to see against the restaurant where you want to eat. Parents and children may haggle over how much homework has to be done before video games can be played.

Who Needs Marriage?

By Renee Garfinkel Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in Time Out
Diversity, inequality and social change are an important context in which to view the decline in marriage and other changes in American family life.

Research Backs Schools' Decision to Ditch Outdated Homework

By Rebecca Jackson on March 24, 2015 in School of Thought
Parents are not given any instruction on how to administer homework. It's assumed that they understand how—presumably based on their own experiences in school. That's ridiculous. Homework has changed dramatically over the past two decades! This article sifts through the current research to show why some homework methods are outdated.

Is Digital Life Risky?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on March 24, 2015 in The Human Beast
Young people who grew up with digital technologies and cannot conceive of a life without the Internet, digital games, and social media are sometimes called “digital natives” whereas older generations who acquired these technologies as adults are “digital immigrants.” Digital natives have many advantages but “addiction” to screens has its critics.

Dad Publicly Shames his Bully Son

With punishments becoming increasingly difficult to enforce, parents of defiant children are beginning to consider publicly humiliating them

Part One: Four Words that Get Buy-In

Sometimes your message is right on. Sometimes you've just got to change the "packaging" so that your message is received instead of resisted. Here is the first of four words I use to create impossible amounts of engagement and enthusiasm in people where seemingly none existed before.