Essential Reads

What We Like About Stories

Both adults and children appreciate elements of surprise and predicability.

The Life-Changing Magic of Helping Kids Get Organized

Five ways to create stability in divorce

What Does It Take to Succeed in Life?

A new study takes a comprehensive look at the American Dream.

Conservative Feminism

Liberals have no monopoly on advancing women's interests

Recent Posts on Parenting

Tips for Parents to Increase Physical Activity in Children

According to research, physical activity plays an important role on academic achievement in children and adolescents. As a parent, your child is dependent on you to guide their healthy habits to cope with life. Here are a few tips to help increase physical activity in youth.

Entitled Teens: 3 Causes, 3 Solutions

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on August 29, 2015 in Fixing Families
Entitled teens feel they can do what they want and get away with it. Unfortunately to their own detriment often do. Three causes and their antidotes for reining in runaway teens

How Parents Can Help Their Child Build Self-Confidence

by Dona Matthews & Joanne Foster. One of the greatest gifts a parent can give a child is self-confidence. Help her understand her unique ability profile, show him that all learning happens in small steps, support her in developing her interests, be available as needed especially in times of change, and help him welcome setbacks as learning opportunities.

6 Signs of Addiction in Adult Children of Alcoholics

By Richard Taite on August 28, 2015 in Ending Addiction for Good
If you’re not already in a household where recognizable addiction, domestic violence or infidelity are the norm, there are warning signs that indicate that you could be on that path. The earlier you get help, the easier it is to make change.

Life May Never Be the Same: Parenting Kids in Recovery

Parenting an adult addict is a difficult path. How different is parenting the recovering adult addict?

Child Proofing versus Tool Using

By David F Lancy Ph.D. on August 27, 2015 in Benign Neglect
We may be “protecting” children from valuable experiences.

Frosh Week and Dangerous Drinking: What Can Parents Do?

By Michael Ungar Ph.D. on August 27, 2015 in Nurturing Resilience
While we know young people are likely to drink during frosh week, the real danger is that they could be dramatically under-estimating the amount of alcohol they're consuming. Here are some suggestions for parents who want to prevent their kids from developing a drinking problem.

Another Mass Shooting

Yesterday the nation was shocked by another mass murder. How can parents talk with their children about these events? Here are some tips for parents as a guide to help kids deal with exposure to violent events.

Why Are Today’s College Students So Emotionally Fragile?

Brain research reveals why controlling parents stunt their children's growth.

Top 10 Best Parenting Sayings

By Maureen D Healy on August 26, 2015 in Creative Development
Are you empowering your kids?

What We Like About Stories

By Jamie Zibulsky Ph.D. on August 26, 2015 in Book Smart
Two of the characteristics of stories that are most important to us as readers or audience members may seem contradictory: we like surprises, but we also like predictability. Children also value these same elements in books, even from a young age.

Reducing Our Children's Stress During The School Year

By Allison Carmen on August 26, 2015 in The Gift of Maybe
As our children are heading back to school, they may already appear a little more stressed. Within weeks of school starting, our children can become irritable, sleep less and you may notice things getting out of whack with family life at home. Here are six tips you can use to help reduce your child's stress so they can feel more balanced and get their work done.

Mathematical Woes

For many youth math can be a fearful and an intimidating subject. Unfortunately, the struggle with math can occur at an early age, and unless it's appropriately addressed the fear can travel well into adulthood.

My Daughter Steals And Lies

By Barbara Greenberg Ph.D. on August 25, 2015 in The Teen Doctor
How To Manage Defiant Daughter

Making New Friends at School

By Kyle D. Pruett M.D. on August 25, 2015 in Once Upon a Child
One friend can’t be expected to match a child’s friendship needs at all levels, so they may have one friend that is mostly companionship, another for intimacy and another for silly games. So that’s the nature side of making new friends; what of the nurture side?

The Life-Changing Magic of Helping Kids Get Organized

By Wendy Paris on August 25, 2015 in Splitopia
Co-parenting in two homes can increase chaos. Help your kids develop organizational skills that will help them now and in the future.

Why America Can’t Read

Advanced research in cognitive science including brain scan science is demonstrating that explicit spelling instruction may be the missing link to reading success in America where sixty-five percent of fourth graders read below proficiency levels.

They Probably Don't Want to Hear It

Don’t people get it? There are others who really do want to hear constantly about how your grandson, at the age of five, is a nationally ranked golfer, but I don’t. Actually, there are only three to five people who do: They are your spouse, your unbelievably wonderful grandchild’s parents, and the other grandparents. And that is it!

Parenting an Alienated Child

Parenting an alienated child is a labor of love

Eat Right

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on August 24, 2015 in Your Wise Brain
Good nutrition is a key part of maintaining your energy as a parent. Eating healthy helps parents stay good-humored and patient with children, even when the oatmeal starts flying. With this in mind, here is your daily Mother Nurture recipe, designed specifically with a parent's nutritional needs in mind. It's got just seven ingredients. This recipe is good for anyone.

What Does It Take to Succeed in Life?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on August 24, 2015 in Media Spotlight
A new paper published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology describes one of the most comprehensive studies to date looking at the effects of family background, personality, and intelligence on later success. By studying 81,000 participants over an eleven-year period, researchers found that the American Dream is still alive and well. More or less.

When Should Your Young Athlete Specialize?

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on August 24, 2015 in The Power of Prime
This question torments every parent who wants to support their children’s efforts as they pursue their own personal greatness in a sport. If you want your kids to stay healthy, stay motivated, and perform better, the experts and the research say that multisport participation is the way to go. But the messages from our culture tell parents something very different.

When Parents and Adolescent Get Stuck in a Hard Place

One trap for parents and teenager when in a hard place with each other is to think hard thoughts and feel hard feelings. By doing so, matters get worse. To make them better it helps to violate negative predictions and disempower feelings from influencing decisions.

8 Simple Truths About Raising Happy, Successful Kids

By Suzanne Gelb Ph.D., J.D. on August 24, 2015 in All Grown Up
Parenting doesn't have to be “mysterious” or “complicated." As I’ve found through my work as a psychologist, coach, and family law attorney, supporting families over the past 28 years — raising awesome kids comes down to some “simple truths.” Live these “simple truths” as consistently as you can, and you — and your kids — are likely to be on the right track.

Pursue an Artistic Career? Advice for You and Parents

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 23, 2015 in How To Do Life
Careers as writer, actor, artist, musician are seductive but when are they worth the risk?

Growing Confident: Parenting to Shatter Boundaries

If we are not willing to be vulnerable – to feel just a little bit unsafe – we will never bump into our boundaries hard enough to shatter them.

Thank You For Not Sharing

By Nick Luxmoore on August 22, 2015 in Young People Up Close
Young people have to learn that there are degrees of privacy, that not sharing is normal.

"Like" Me: Why Girls Need More Breaks from Social Media

As a parent you are probably thinking that this constant pressure to be “Liked” sounds like an exhausting way to live. Who can relax when everything you say and do is analyzed, photographed, posted for an audience, and evaluated? To feel you have to be on at all times,and if you go for too long without checking your phone or computer, life might leave you behind?

Five Steps to Improved Parenting

This single father is raising two stellar teenagers on his own using a technique he calls "The 4 C's". No small feat for any parent, much less one who suffers from service-related post-traumatic stress due to 3 tours in the Middle East. We can all learn from what he has to share.

4 Things Pixar's Inside Out Can Teach Parents About Emotions

By Tamar Chansky Ph.D on August 21, 2015 in Worry Wise
Every time we see tears in our children's eyes our inner control panel goes through the same process —we want to body dive sadness and get it off our kids — fast. I would say that this lesson to not fear our children's sadness is the one that we have to relearn just about every time we see tears. I don't want my kids to be sad.