Essential Reads

Stars, Bars, and Embryos

Confederate flag and genetic testing issues are more alike than one might think

What Narcissists REALLY Want, and Can Never Get

What narcissists long for is worlds apart from what they actually pursue.

We Succeed by Our Failures

The critical role of misbehavior and apology for kids and for parents

What Helicopter Parents Need to Know

Nurturing college students for success, not dependency

Recent Posts on Parenting

Liar, Liar, Working Memory on Fire

Working Memory can make you a better liar, research shows

Post-Baby Mental Health, For Dads

If you’re about to become a father, there’s little likelihood anyone will talk with you about how these experiences will change your life.

5 Strategies to Reduce Gender Bias Against Girls As Leaders

These 5 stategies for reducing gender bias were recently developed by researchers at Harvard University. These 5 easy tips have the potential to close the gender gap in leadership for teenage girls in the future.

Stars, Bars, and Embryos

By Elliot Hosman J.D. on July 28, 2015 in Genetic Crossroads
The ideas of "choice" and "intent" have arisen in debates about both the confederate flag and prenatal genetic testing. But are these concepts insufficiently nuanced for these tough topics?

Why I Tossed the Gummy Vitamins

By Zanthe Taylor M.F.A. on July 28, 2015 in A Million Meals
Parents make most, if not all, food and health choices for our young children: the pressure of that constant decision-making, plus our primal drive to ensure they survive and thrive, creates a potent stew of emotions that makes us particularly vulnerable both to magical thinking about food and to those who exploit it.

Does Your Child Need To See A Psychologist?

By Mack R. Hicks Ph.D. on July 28, 2015 in Digital Pandemic
The idea that all children are pretty much the same is a great American Myth. Teachers need to discover their students' learning styles and personalities.

What Narcissists REALLY Want, and Can Never Get

Among other things, narcissists typically come across as arrogant, manipulative, entitled, and woefully lacking in empathy. But if these defining features are understood at a deeper level—as powerful psychological defenses to protect them from experiencing a truly frightening vulnerability—a quite different picture of them emerges. . . .

We Succeed by Our Failures

When we reflect on our childhood we tend to recall the tough times -- times when we as kids screwed up, or when our parents failed. It turns out that the dance between love and hate, doing right and doing wrong, and above all making amends is critical for secure attachments. We learn to trust other, indeed, we learn to be moral as part of a normal developmental process.

Inside Out Movie Focuses on the Importance of Emotions

By Kate Roberts Ph.D. on July 27, 2015 in Savvy Parenting
Disney's Pixar Inside Out movie teaches through entertainment, the importance of processing and understanding a child's emotions.

Rx Pain Meds and Teens – A Troubling Combination

Do you know about the dangers lurking in your medicine cabinet? Chances are, like many of us, you have one or more unused prescription bottles sitting in your medicine cabinet right now. For parents with teens, this can be a very dangerous scenario.

Do “Autism Parents” Face Increased Stigma for Mental Health?

Despite the fact that mental health is centrally tied to our overall well-being, parents of children with autism may find themselves not only combating the general public’s shared stigma related to mental illness and therapeutic services, but must also contend with additional challenges in overcoming the stigmatization of supporting their own psychological needs.

A Second Look at Helicopter Parenting

By Kyle D. Pruett M.D. on July 27, 2015 in Once Upon a Child
When I first heard the term ‘helicopter parenting’ some 30 years ago, I thought ‘hmm- clever, but ouch’, and filed it under ‘probably not helpful’ in my memory.

What Helicopter Parents Need to Know

How can concerned parents help today's college students become healthier, more successful young adults?

I Hate Multiple Choice

What do multiple choice tests measure? Is that what we want to know?

Adolescence and the Allure of the Internet

Today's parents must raise children in two worlds, offline and online, and for adolescents freedom on the Internet has a powerful allure.

Baby Crying? Don't Shame the Parents!

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on July 26, 2015 in Moral Landscapes
A medical doctor, also a parent, wrote to me recently to complain about my blog post, "'Dangers of Crying it Out.'" Here is (most of) my response.

The Archeology of Misbehavior

Archeology is the study of human activity in the past. The archeology of misbehavior is studying current behavior to uncover hidden sources. The “ruins” of misdeeds are built upon personality architecture and cultural landscapes.

Spiritual Power to Redirect the Impact of Divorce

Children often experience divorce as the death of the family. Parents may draw upon spiritual insight to redefine the family, demonstrating how authentic faith models healthy relating, among other critical qualities to support the child's development of healthy relationships.

47 Reasons Why It's Really, Really Good to Be an Aunt

By Melanie Notkin on July 24, 2015 in Savvy Auntie
Every aunt knows how fortunate we are to have the love of our nieces and nephews. And we are grateful to their parents, who have given us the gift of aunthood. And so, Auntie's Day is also a time for us to appreciate all really good things that aunthood brings...

Better Than Chocolate

By Elias Aboujaoude M.D. on July 24, 2015 in Compulsive Acts
A new parent-child reward-punishment dynamic centered on technology.

5 Things We Know for Sure About Raising Great Kids

Research has been following children from babyhood to adulthood for decades, so we actually know what works to raise great kids. Here are the five most important things.

I May Be a Jackass, But I Can Be Taught to Care

A jackass is an ornery animal. You can lead it to water, but you can't make it drink. Are kids the same way?

Finding My Daughter Again Through the Outdoors

I think much parenting anxiety centers around how the kids will turn out and whether the choices you made will impact them in good ways or not so good ways. You wonder how you’ll feel about them as people, too, whether you’ll like who they become as adults. You know you’ll love them, but will you like them?

Can Oxytocin Fortify Resilience Against Childhood Adversity?

A new study from Emory University reports that manipulating the oxytocin system has the potential to fortify a person's resilience against childhood adversity, abuse, or neglect.

Is Family Equality a Right to Surrogacy?

By Elliot Hosman J.D. on July 22, 2015 in Genetic Crossroads
With marriage equality the law of the land, the dignity of LGBTQ families calls for an ongoing conversation about the regulation of the ART and surrogacy industries.

Spanking Makes Kids More Aggressive

By Temma Ehrenfeld on July 22, 2015 in Open Gently
Monkey see, monkey do. Kids who are spanked are more likely to hit.

7 Key Signs of a Lying Child or Teenager

Psychologist Adrian Furnham identified a variety of ways to detect whether an individual may be dishonest. We can apply some of the tips to communication situations with young persons. Here are seven ways to tell if a child or teenager might be lying to you...

7 Kinds of Marriages – and One Awesome Alternative

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on July 22, 2015 in Living Single
Actually, success in marriage isn't all about communication and intimacy and negotiating conflict. You and your partner need to decide what you want to get out of your marriage. Here are 7 very different kinds of marriage goals. Alternatively, embrace your single life!

Stories of Seclusion: Obsessed with Margaret Sanger

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 22, 2015 in How To Do Life
A woman attempts to reconcile how Planned Parenthood's founder could be a leading eugenicist.

Why Can Domestic Violence Get Passed From Parent to Child?

It can be hard to understand why a child who is exposed to domestic violence might go on to experience violence in later adult relationships.