Essential Reads

Does Mindfulness Really Make Us Resilient?

The evidence misrepresents the truth: we need far more than emotional regulation

Out of Sight, But Not Out of Mind

Your brain adapts to the tools you use based on how they feel

User's Manual for the Male Brain

Three excerpts that will help you get more enjoyment from the device

Recent Posts on Neuroscience

God, the Future, and our Brain

By Joseph A Shrand M.D. on October 04, 2015 The I-M Approach
As we evolved humans developed an ability to anticipate the consequence of our action. This critical part of our survival brought with it an unexpected consequence: when we think about the future, we may think about our mortality. This fear may have contributed to our conception of a powerful entity to protect us after our bodies no longer can.

Does Mindfulness Really Make Us Resilient?

When Todd Sampson demonstrated that neuroplasticity could make his ordinary brain extraordinary, he forgot to mention that he had an amazing arsenal of supports helping him achieve his goals. Mindfulness practices may help us focus and regulate our emotions, but their ability to change our lives is vastly over-rated.

Purkinje Cells Burst to Life with State-Dependent Excitation

Neuroscientists have discovered that Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum toggle between a silent "down" state and a bursting "up" state depending on levels of electrical activity.

Connection: The Gift That Keeps on Giving

By Amy Banks on October 02, 2015 Wired For Love
No matter who you are or where you live, when you are in healthy relationships you increase the chance of living longer and dying happier.

The Power of Talk

By Lydia Denworth on October 01, 2015 Brain Waves
What is the best way to nurture a child's brain? The answer is simpler than you think.

OxyContin for Kids? What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

By Dan Mager MSW on October 01, 2015 Some Assembly Required
We know that teenagers are at a higher risk for addiction than adults because of their immature brain development. And we know from significant demonstrated history that even if prescribed with the best of intentions, expanding the availability of opioid pain medications can have unforeseen and tragic consequences.

How does childhood trauma affect the adult brain?

What is the affect of negative childhood experiences on the adult brain?

The Best Way to Process Big Data Is Unconsciously

By Susan Weinschenk Ph.D. on October 01, 2015 Brain Wise
The conscious mind can handle only a small subset of data at one time, but the unconscious is great at taking in large amounts of data and finding patterns. If you want to see the patterns in big data, you have to engage the unconscious.

Detection and Management of Depression and Bipolar Disease

By Julie K Hersh on October 01, 2015 Struck By Living
On September 1, 2015, the Center for Depression Research and Clinical Care at UT Southwestern under the direction of Dr. Madhukar Trivedi was officially launched. Dr. Trivedi, an internationally recognized expert in depression and mood disorders, received the 2015 American Psychiatric Association Award for Research, the Association’s most significant award for research.

Five Reasons iPads Should NOT Be In Classrooms

By Susan Greenfield Ph.D. on October 01, 2015 Mind Change
There is growing backlash against iPads in the classroom, as there remains no evidence that they help learning, and some experts even argue they could have a negative effect.

God, Mathematics and Psychology

By Mario D Garrett PhD on September 30, 2015 iAge
This discussion focuses on psychology and the philosophy of mathematics and will contribute nothing to mathematical thought. Its aim is to introduce mathematics as a creation of psychology. Sophisticated, complex and ever evolving, but nevertheless psychology.

My Life with Nonverbal Learning Disability

By Jon Fortenbury on September 30, 2015 NeuroProgress
It's a debilitating condition not often discussed. This writer is ready to change that.

Gratitude as Science: 4 Paths Lead to Love and Happiness

By Rita Watson MPH on September 30, 2015 With Love and Gratitude
Grateful people are happier, have more social connections, and fewer bouts of depression. Adapting gratitude as attitude reaps benefits.

Does a Dog's Body Language Tell Us How Much He Has Learned?

You can read a dog's body language — specifically his mouth, eyes, ear position, and tail carriage and wagging — to learn whether he has learned an obedience task well.

Why We Love to Hate Politicians

You may think politicians deserve the hate spewed at them because others seem to feel that way. It helps to know that the mammal brain bonds around common enemies. The mammal brain seeks safe ways to oppose power. The mammal brain mirrors others and relies on old pathways. Your inner mammal feels good when you hate politicians, which lures you to forget that it's hate.

How Are Human Traits Linked to Specific Brain Connections?

By Christopher Bergland on September 30, 2015 The Athlete's Way
Researchers at Oxford University have identified that positive and negative human traits are linked to specific brain connections.

Bilateral Drawing: Self-Regulation for Trauma Reparation

Current trauma research indicates that bilateral stimulation in the form of eye movement desensitization (EMDR) and similar methods are effective for many individuals. But is there a more creative way to engage cross-hemisphere activity for reparation and recovery?

Why You Trust Your Friends Even When They're Ripping You Off

By David DiSalvo on September 29, 2015 Neuronarrative
Your brain wants to trust. We’re wired for social connection—not just casual meet and greets, but genuine connection—and trust is what makes it work. But that same drive to trust, essential though it is, also makes us natural born suckers.

How Mindfulness Improves Your Brain and Relationships

Mindfulness is the process of paying attention, in an open, nonjudgmental way, to your experience. Recent statistical review which pooled data from 16 studies shows that mindfulness has effects on at least 8 different brain regions involved in brain integration and connectivity, sense of self, impulse control, stress and anxiety, and regulation of attention and emotion.

Out of Sight, But Not Out of Mind

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on September 29, 2015 Black Belt Brain
Ever wonder at a beautiful between the legs return in tennis, or an incredible behind the back pass in ice hockey? The sense of touch can help do that even when the athlete can't see where the racket or the stick is—they just know.

The Sources of Fear Perception

By Shahram Heshmat Ph.D. on September 29, 2015 Science of Choice
The development and maintenance of anxiety is jointly determined by the relative strength of emotional brain and cognitive capacity to control unwanted responses.

No, You Can’t Pick My Brain, But I’ll Talk to You Anyway

By Adam Grant Ph.D. on September 29, 2015 Give and Take
Why you might want to take that meeting

Are Your I-Centric Habit Patterns Getting the Best of You?

As you read the followng seven I-centric habit patterns, identify ones that do not serve your organization and see them as opportunities to develop WE-centric patterns. Monitor your impact. Notice how, by shifting to WE-centric patterns, you increase positive energy, focus your colleagues on creating the future, and enable greater leadership behaviors in everyone.

Psychology of Deep Connection

There is a part of the brain that activates when we meet people. It’s called the "like me/not like me" part of the brain or the Rostromedial Prefrontal Cortex. However, there is another part of our brain that has a bigger impact on us — and one that explains deep connection.

One Easy Question Can Help Break the Anxiety Cycle

By Christopher Bergland on September 29, 2015 The Athlete's Way
Researchers have identified that asking yourself one easy question can help break the anxiety cycle.

Make Candor a Priority

Here are 5 things you can do, as a Leader of Change, to elevate candor and TRUST as the foundation for healthy conversations in your organization.

Fear the Walking Dead: Can Brain Parasites Make Us Zombies?

By Joe Pierre M.D. on September 28, 2015 Psych Unseen
Can brain infections really turn us into zombies? Research with the human brain parasite Toxoplasma gondii suggests that yes, maybe they can.

The 6 Mental Health Habits That Kill Your Confidence

Do you struggle with self-doubt and self-defeating habits? Do you want to feel more confident about yourself and what you have to offer? Do you focus on pleasing others, rather than following your dreams and living your best life? The best way to start feeling better about yourself is to notice the automatic mental and emotional habits that don’t serve you well.

6 Ways to Tell if You’re Dating a Narcissist

While narcissists can be attractive, entertaining, sharp, and funny to watch from a distance, you don’t want to date or marry one. If you are already entangled with one, you may be reeling with confusion, self-doubt, and damaged self-esteem. Unfortunately, the chances of hooking up with a narcissist at some time in your dating or relationship life are pretty strong.

User's Manual for the Male Brain

Theory and practice of getting the best and avoiding the worst in male humans