Essential Reads

Brains Have Owners

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 26, 2017 in Memory Medic
Is there an avatar in your brain called "I"? Neuroscience suggests this is the case.

Cognitive Benefits of Exercise Outshine Brain-Training Games

There is growing evidence that physical activity is more effective than sedentary "brain-training" games for maintaining robust cognitive function and "working memory" as we age.
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Brain-Computer Interfaces and the Future of Humanity

Is merging the human brain with artificial intelligence the next phase of human evolution?

Even Fish Need Friends

By Lydia Denworth on April 21, 2017 in Brain Waves
Friends calm us down when we're stressed. But how? There's still a lot scientists don't know, but recent studies in animals and humans provide some answers.

More Posts on Neuroscience

Breaking Whole

Trauma may break through the limits of our beings and create space for beautiful, unencumbered strength.
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Change, Little Bit by Little Bit

Large changes start small. Sometimes they stay that way.

Swimming: The Key to Extending the Life Span in Autism?

By Mark Borigini M.D. on April 28, 2017 in Overcoming Pain
They may wander toward a body of water, perhaps drawn to the calming effect, touching it and then wading into pools, ponds, or rivers. And some will never wade out.

The Neuroscience of Hearing the Soundtracks of Your Life

Neuroscientists recently discovered that someone's favorite music—or any song you'd put on a "this is my life" soundtrack—activates brain networks in universally predictable ways.

Scans Reveal Diametric Differences in More Detail

A followup study to a previous one that showed striking diametric differences between autistic and psychotic brains also reveals similarities in the so-called social brain.

Why Am I Dependent on Caffeine, and How Can I Wean Off?

Many of us require a cup of coffee (or five) every morning. Why do we become dependent on caffeine? And is it possible to wean off and get back to "normal"?

Dogs Prefer Advice From People Who Actually Have the Answers

Data shows that dogs try to "read your mind" to see if you have reliable information before responding to your instructions.
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Guilty, With an Explanation

The increasing use of neuroscience in behalf of criminal defendants with "defective" brains raises a perennial question: how do we define responsibility and free will?

Fatigue, the Brain and Therapists

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on April 26, 2017 in Trouble in Mind
Studies have found that debilitating fatigue is a common symptom of many types of brain damage and disorders, from mild head injury to benign pituitary adenoma to dementia.

Is Social Pain Real Pain? Rejection Hurts, For Real!

The same brain areas involved in processing physical pain such burning or hurt are also activated when a negative comment burns or when your feelings are hurt. Social pain is real

Why Relying on GPS Does Your Brain No Favors

It's all too easy to let tech such as GPS do all your thinking for you, isn't it? But you might want to consider what invaluable mental resources you're losing in return.

Build Trust and Productivity With a Simple Conversation

By Peter Bregman on April 24, 2017 in How We Work
Are your words building trust and enabling your colleagues to do their best work?

Enough Is Enough Series, Part 6: LSD Reconsidered

Psychiatry is considering using LSD to treat psychiatric conditions. An extremely bad idea.

7 Stress Hacks You Can Use in the Next 5 Minutes

Science is helping us find new, simple and quick ways to de-stress by activating different brain networks and nervous system responses.Here are 7 new ways to manage your stress.
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Can You make Your Employees Happier?

Let’s face it managing people can be tough, and despite your best efforts your people may be part of the growing numbers who feel disengaged from their jobs.

Morality: Seeds Must Be Planted Rightly in Early LIfe

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on April 23, 2017 in Moral Landscapes
It’s easy to believe that reasoning is the most important aspect of morality. But it isn't. Morality "goes all the way down" to how well our neurobiological systems work.
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Is Trazodone the New Brain Wonder Drug?

Will an old, cheap drug end Alzheimer's?

Aaron Hernandez: Tragic Choices or Brain Trauma?

With a football player again in the news—one whose brain is being sent to BU for examination—young athletes and professionals will be reminded of the risks.

10 Reasons Why Silence Really Is Golden

Could the answer to improved health be as simple as silence?

Treating Depression by Training Your Amygdala

A recent study indicates that increasing activity in the amygdala during positive memory retrieval can have a strong antidepressant effect in depressed individuals.

Imprinting and the Epigenetics of the Brain and Sleep

One of the best-understood epigenetic mechanisms—genomic imprinting—explains much about both sleep and the brain.

Train Too Much and a Dog Won't Remember

Back to back training sessions involving different tasks impairs a dog's long-term memory of what he has learned

How Do Work Breaks Help Your Brain? 5 Surprising Answers

By Meg Selig on April 18, 2017 in Changepower
Work smarter. Take a break! Discover 5 reasons why work breaks can lift your productivity, creativity, and motivation...as well as your spirits.

Where Do You Live?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on April 17, 2017 in Your Wise Brain
Be aware of breathing and let everything else go. There's always a doorway to a deeper sense of presence and peace: being the body.

Sports Are Games Played by Humans

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on April 16, 2017 in Black Belt Brain
Sports are played basically everywhere--but they aren't played at crime scenes. Time to push back on instant replay and slow-motion dissection of every event.
canstockphoto 26401185 Mandelbrot set

What Makes the Human Brain “Human?” Part 1

A quick introduction to some possible anatomical underpinnings of higher consciousness in humans and other animals.

Why Are We All so frightened?

By Gary L. Wenk Ph.D. on April 16, 2017 in Your Brain on Food
Humans fear everything that is unfamiliar or not-like-me: we fear unfamiliar dogs, people who look or dress differently, unfamiliar places, things that go bump in the night, etc.
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Are We Dreaming All the Time?

Is dreaming truly different from wakefulness?
Lori Russell-Chapin

Does Neurocounseling Education Impact Age Differently?

By Lori Russell-Chapin Ph.D. on April 15, 2017 in Brain Waves
Is it possible that neurocounseling and bridging brain and behavior can help us live more effectively and be helpful for any age group?

The Neural Correlates of Dreaming

By Patrick McNamara Ph.D. on April 15, 2017 in Dream Catcher
Dreaming can occur in all sleep states and is associated with a particular brain region.