Essential Reads

Can Dogs Teach Other Dogs to Speak?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on September 28, 2016 in Canine Corner
A dog can learn how to make and use specific sounds for communication simply by observing other dogs

Memory Loss Associated With Alzheimer's May Be Reversible

By Kevin Murnane, Ph.D. on September 28, 2016 in The Info Monkey
New research holds out hope that the loss of memory function that accompanies Alzheimer's may be preventable and reversible if the disease is caught early enough.

Do My Gut Bacteria Make Me Look Fat?

Can we manipulate our gut bacteria to help shed a few pounds?

What Does Your Plastic Brain Need to Grow?

By Lori Russell-Chapin Ph.D. on September 26, 2016 in Brain Waves
What does your brain need to grow? Create these 8 neuroplastic circumstances to enrich your brain!

More Posts on Neuroscience

Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human

By The Book Brigade on September 29, 2016 in The Author Speaks
We need a new definition of “mind,” one that captures the importance of subjective and relational experience.
By Andreashorn [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The Sleep Connectome

By John Cline Ph.D. on September 29, 2016 in Sleepless in America
Advanced imaging techniques and powerful analytic methods allow the creation of stunning maps of functional and anatomical brain connections. Can they help understand sleep?

A New Science of Human Evolution—and Evolutionary Psychiatry

A new book highlights the revolution sweeping through evolution thanks to genomics and sets a precedent that the imprinted brain theory has already followed.

The Cerebellum May Drive Sex Distinction in Our Social Brain

By Christopher Bergland on September 29, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
How do sex differences play a role in the development of our social brain? A new study on specific neurons in the cerebellum (Latin for "little brain") offers some valuable clues.

Five Proven Truths About Finding Happiness

There is no magic pill that can make us happy forever, but when we better understand the nature of happiness we can become more skillful at staying happy.

Does Donald Trump Have Free Will?

By Erin Clabough Ph.D. on September 28, 2016 in Neuroparent
What does neuroscience tell us about Trump's future choices?

The Bacteria That Mold Your Brain

By Jordan Gaines Lewis, Ph.D. on September 28, 2016 in Brain Babble
New research shows that the microbiome plays a huge role in our behavior. Can changing our diet become a new health treatment?

Oxytocin, Spirituality, and the Biology of Feeling Connected

By Christopher Bergland on September 28, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A groundbreaking new study from Duke University has identified a link between oxytocin and feelings of spiritual connectedness.

Is a Vacation or Meditation the Key to Stress Relief?

You're feeling chronically stressed out by work, money, family, or commuting. Will a vacation solve the problem or do you need to take more drastic measures like meditating?

The Mindspan Diet

By The Book Brigade on September 27, 2016 in The Author Speaks
America’s dietary recommendations may not be in the best interests of cognitive longevity.

Debate Scorecard for the Presidency: Trust

The selection of our next president is fast approaching. What is the criteria you will use to make that selection? Here's a scorecard to help you really think, consider and decide.
ID 1563078 © Rayna Canedy | Dreamstime.com

How the Words You Use Can Decrease Anxiety

By Richard Taite on September 23, 2016 in Ending Addiction for Good
A healthy concern for your well-being can make you more likely to anticipate and effectively head-off possible threats.

A Better Idea for Mark Zuckerberg: A Super-Intelligence Pill

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on September 23, 2016 in How To Do Life
Instead of his likely unrealistic goal of trying to cure all disease, he should fund research to create a super-intelligence pill.

Darkness in the Morning, Depression in the Afternoon

It is a warmer than usual autumn, but nevertheless the diminished light of winter will soon arrive. Here are some ideas to stay ahead of Seasonal Affective Disorder.

Trust Your Gut—There's Nothing Woo-Woo About the Vagus Nerve

By Christopher Bergland on September 23, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study found that financial traders who trust their gut feelings and have grace under pressure are more successful. What is the physiological explanation for this phenomenon?
stocksy.com

3 Ways to Improve Wellbeing at Work

The word ‘wellbeing’ is increasingly being thrown around workplaces today.

Bridging Difference: Beyond Us vs. Them

By Amy Banks on September 21, 2016 in Wired For Love
The human community is at a seminal crossroads. Are we going to use our brains to build edifices that cement the association between difference and danger?

Mindfulness for All

By Susan M. Pollak MTS, Ed.D., on September 21, 2016 in The Art of Now
Can mindfulness and compassion reduce racial bias?

The Blank Slate Controversy

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on September 21, 2016 in The Human Beast
Behaviorists used to argue that people were blank slates in the sense that almost all of our behavior was learned. Evolutionary psychologists disagree. Who is correct?

Passionate Surrender

Fear of passionate surrender is rooted in an underdeveloped sense of self. Passionate surrender is a joyous function of a fully realized adult brain.
Photo: iStock

Not Productive? 7 Ways to Get Unstuck

By Mark Banschick M.D. on September 20, 2016 in The Intelligent Divorce
Summer is over. Are you having problems switching gears? Here are 7 ways to get going.
mipan at bigstock.com

Overcoming Excuses for Not Taking Care of Your Brain

By Susan Noonan MD on September 20, 2016 in View From the Mist
Sometimes it’s easier to believe the faulty logic of these thoughts – don’t!

Does an Abusive Upbringing Damage the Brain?

There are well-known associations between abuse or neglect early in life and later psychological or psychiatric complications. What do we know about what goes on in the brain?

Storytelling Is a Conduit for Intergenerational Learning

Have you shared a well-told story with a teen or grandchild lately? The result could be transformative for both of you!

To What Is Your Mind Given?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on September 19, 2016 in Your Wise Brain
Return to reliable rewards of feeling already full. Savor pleasure, move, lift your eyes to the horizon, enjoy art, feel the core of your body, and come into the present moment.

What Teachers Need to Know About Their Students' Brains

By Eric Haseltine Ph.D. on September 17, 2016 in Long Fuse, Big Bang
Hot-off-the-press research suggests a radically new way to teach

Your Left Cerebellar Hemisphere May Play a Role in Cognition

By Christopher Bergland on September 17, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Traditionally, the cerebellum has been considered a "non-thinking" part of our brain. However, a new study reports that specific cerebellar brain regions are involved in cognition.
ID 56063305 © Sergey Khakimullin | Dreamstime.com

Here’s Why Your Brain Makes Quitting Drugs/Alcohol So Hard

By Richard Taite on September 16, 2016 in Ending Addiction for Good
There’s little more tempting than a quick and easy solution to our problems.

Enough Is Enough Series Part 5: ADHD Is Exposed

By Robert Berezin M.D. on September 16, 2016 in The Theater of the Brain
Children must be raised with boundaries and love. To provide the best holding environment for our children has to be our parental imperative. Regarding ADHD, we have lost our way.

5 Brain-Based Reasons to Teach Handwriting in School

Did you know that handwriting will make you and your child smarter than keyboarding?