Essential Reads

Sexual Assault Stories Flood the Internet—Now the Next Step

By Marty Babits on October 19, 2016 in The Middle Ground
Many thousands of women are giving voice to painful experiences of traumatic assault. Many are mobilized now for more intensive healing. Find out how they can follow through.

Groundbreaking Study Roots Out Signs of Depression in Brain

By Christopher Bergland on October 18, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
This pioneering discovery could lead to more effective treatments for depression.

The Neuroscience of Finger Length Ratio and Athletic Prowess

By Christopher Bergland on October 14, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have found a correlation between finger length ratios and brain function. A new study reports that having a shorter index finger may indicate athletic potential.
Ben Harding/iStock

A New Look at the Role of Apps in Distracted Teen Driving

New research reveals app usage is a major risk for distracted driving. The results provide a useful guide for productive conversations between teens and parents.

More Posts on Neuroscience

Personality and the Brain, Part 5

People's psychic abilities can be explained by a peculiar crossing of the senses.
By Nogas1974 (Own work), via Wikimedia Commons This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

Biology Determines Every Thought, Feeling, and Behavior

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on October 20, 2016 in Cui Bono
Psychologists say behavior results from the interaction of biology and environment, yet argue about their relative importance. Read why the importance of biology is always 100%.

The Ageless Inspiration of Activity

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on October 20, 2016 in Black Belt Brain
Ever thought you were too old for something? Aging doesn't mean we have to get old. Getting old comes with all sorts of baggage that isn't a requirement of aging.

You Have Power Over Your Brain Chemistry

Your brain has an operating system inherited from earlier animals. It rewards you with "happy chemicals" when you step toward meeting needs and alarms you with "unhappy chemicals.

Can You Come Home to Yourself?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on October 20, 2016 in Your Wise Brain
Meditation is the quintessential training of attention. Getting better control of your attention is the foundation of changing your brain, and thus your life, for the better.

Risky Teenage Behavior Linked to Imbalanced Brain Activity

By Christopher Bergland on October 20, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study from Dartmouth pinpoints the brain mechanisms linked to risk-taking and impulse control during adolescence. This discovery explains why teenagers are often reckless.

Personality and the Brain, Part 4

When the bossy left hemisphere is “shushed” and the creative right brain is allowed to “speak,” artistic talent proliferates.

Why Community Support Is Important With Orphan Diseases

A community comes together for brain tumor research.

Do “Brain Games” Sharpen Your Mind?

Over the past decade, scientists have zeroed in on “brain training” to improve cognitive skills. But does it work?

Personality and the Brain, Part 3

When the connection between the emotional brain and the front of the brain is damaged, people have trouble interpreting or feeling their emotions.

Personality and the Brain, Part 2

“Leigh used to be the class clown,” Amber said. “She would immediately shift a sinister atmosphere into a cheerful one. Now she barely smiles."

Personality and the Brain, Part 1

One evening on October 11, 2009, life took a dramatic turn for 41-year-old Leigh Erceg.

Your Amygdala May House Both Positive and Negative Memories

By Christopher Bergland on October 17, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Positive and negative memories may be housed in specific regions of the amygdala, according to a new mice study. These findings offer many clues for overcoming negativity and fear.

Are Humans Predisposed to Fear Snakes?

By Nathan H. Lents, Ph.D. on October 17, 2016 in Beastly Behavior
Researchers have found that it is easier to train humans and other primates to fear snakes than other dangers, indicating a genetic predisposition for the fear of snakes.

A Drug to Improve Performance and Creativity

If study drugs give you a significant cognitive advantage, do you "cheat" if you take them? Do you become a different person?

Claustrophobia: Cause and Cure

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on October 16, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
On top of a building, the most direct escape is to jump, a thought that can trigger panic and make stairs and elevators seem impossible to navigate. The answer: alarm attenuation

What Is Positive Psychology?

How do you explain what positive psychology is to others?

Which Candidate Will Make America Safer?

By Gleb Tsipursky Ph.D. on October 15, 2016 in Intentional Insights
Both candidates promise to make you safer. But which one will actually do so? This articles describes how research shows how candidates mislead our intuitions on this topic.

Medical Marijuana and Pregnancy

By Ira J. Chasnoff M.D. on October 15, 2016 in Aristotle's Child
Should a doctor do a pregnancy test before prescribing marijuana to a woman of childbearing age?
Photo courtesy of Ricci Coughlan/DFID Flickr Creative Commons

Thank You, Michelle Obama!

In this time of change and challenge, children need help becoming smart and creative. Thank you, Michelle Obama, for living this message so effectively.

Your Brain and That "Other National Deficit"

Recent research indicates that our brain's susceptibility to false memories of the past may actually come in handy in our encounters with unfamiliar situations in the future.

A Presidential Headache: The Concussion Generation

By Harry Kerasidis M.D. on October 12, 2016 in Brain Trauma
The massive numbers of concussions are adding up to a generation of mental health problems. An opportunity awaits the next president, and ironically, it's not that expensive.

How to Keep a Dog From Jumping Up on People

You can keep a dog from jumping on people by considering the dog's behavior, and how people usually respond to the behavior.

Struggle for a Sense of Humanity

The fight to hold onto a sense of humanity inner voices of conflict, powered by covert guilt and shame. In most of us, these voices are faint. In some they bellow.

Are Stress and Obesity Related?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on October 12, 2016 in Media Spotlight
Though the main causes of obesity are high food intake, lack of adequate exercise, and genetic susceptibility, researchers have long suspected that stress may play a role as well.

Running May Help Repair Some Types of Brain Damage

By Christopher Bergland on October 12, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Aerobic exercise triggers the production of a molecule that can repair some types of brain damage and speeds up communication between brain regions, new study finds.
Dora Calott Wang

Growing Pains in the Teenage Brain

By Dora Calott Wang M.D. on October 11, 2016 in The Kitchen Shrink
Growing pains occur more for the teenage brain, than even the teenage body

3 Things to Say to Your Loved One Who Won’t Vaccinate

Does someone you love espouse unscientific views? Are you concerned for their health and security? Here are some ways to talk to them about your concerns.

Parental Age & Mental Illness: The Maternal Dimension

The biggest and most comprehensive study of the effects of parental age on offspring mental illness confirms counter-tuitive predictions of the imprinted brain theory.