Neuroscience Essential Reads

Helping Children Succeed: Brain Science in the Classroom

By Claudia M Gold M.D. on May 24, 2016 in Child in Mind
Paul Tough grew to recognize that the qualities that help children succeed are not "skills" that are "taught" but rather qualities that develop in early relationships
Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

5 Top Parenting Challenges and How to Deal with Them

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on May 24, 2016 in Singletons
Tweaking how you respond to tantrums or aggression, whining or back talk can put an end to power struggles and create loving, lasting bonds with your children.
Pixabay

Working Better: Brain Science in Business

There are many brain science lessons that can be applied in organisations from sleep hygiene to managing stress to fostering creativity.

Using Brain Scans to Diagnose Mental Disorders

Some clinics are using brain imaging (especially SPECT) for diagnosing psychological conditions like ADHD and depression, but there's little science to support this use.

A (Metaphorical) Bridge Between Semantic Order and Chaos

Walt Whitman once asked, “Have you felt so proud to get at the meaning of poems?” Research on the neural networks involved in metaphor processing justifies that feeling of pride.

Are You Killing Your Dog With Sweetness?

The FDA warns that a sweetener used in sugarless gum, candy, baked goods, toothpaste, and some nut butters can be life-threatening to dogs.

We Are, Where We Are: Spatial Cognition Shapes Our Self-Hood

The physical environments that surround you have a huge impact on who you are in the present moment and cumulatively throughout your lifespan, according to new research.

Does Difference Scare You?

By Amy Banks on May 16, 2016 in Wired For Love
In this environment it is harder to dodge and hide from other’s opinions and beliefs when we disagree.

Sleep Deprived? Got Brain Fog? Chocolate to the Rescue!

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on May 16, 2016 in Cravings
After a poor night's sleep, chocolate may give you a brain boost.

5 Reasons the Cerebellum Is Key to Thriving in a Digital Age

For human beings to thrive in a digital age, the cerebellum must not be allowed to atrophy by sitting all day, limiting face-to-face contact, or excessive screen time.
Aniwhite/Shutterstock

When Intelligence Flourishes, the Questions Get Tougher

Human and machine intelligence are flourishing. Is our wisdom keeping pace?

The Real Reason Why Climbing Stairs Leaves You Breathless

Even if you're in good shape, you probably get winded by quickly running up a flight of stairs. Why? Because your brain tells your body to stop breathing.

You Can't Force Brilliance

Whether you are trying to figure out where you parked your car or avoid calling someone the wrong name, again, don't overthink it!

Some Men Are Sexual Poachers: Their Brains May Reveal Them

Some men seek to attract other men's partners, others do not. Now there are indications that activation of a particular part of the brain may separate them.

Why We Lose Our Appetites When We Get Sick

If you’ve ever fallen ill and found yourself barely able to stomach a spoonful of chicken soup, you already know that getting sick can be a major appetite killer.

Why Insomnia Isn’t Just a Nighttime Problem

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on May 05, 2016 in Sleep Newzzz
Emerging research indicates that insomnia isn’t just something that happens at night, it's a 24-hour condition.

Your Brain Does Not Like Sleeping in a New Place

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on May 02, 2016 in Good Thinking
Only half of your brain enters deep sleep when you try to sleep in an unfamiliar place.
Ed Gregory /stokpic.com/pexels.com

Why It's So Hard to Fall Asleep When You're Away From Home

There's no place to sleep like home - with new challenges for travel.

Daydream Your Way to Better Grades

Got a final exam tomorrow (or some other memory task)? A good night’s sleep is the best preparation, but what if you don't have time for sleep? New research offers a ray of hope.
Photo courtesy of Dietrich Stout and Emory University

Tool Use and the Emergence of Language

By Laura Otis Ph.D. on April 24, 2016 in Rethinking Thought
Motor and language skills may seem distinct, but in human brains they are closely related.

Can Dogs See in Ultraviolet?

Recent research suggests that dogs may see patterns in the ultraviolet that are invisible to humans.

Rumination: A Problem in Anxiety and Depression

Rumination is one of the similarities between anxiety and depression. Ruminating is simply repetitively going over a thought or a problem without completion.

Chimps Like Us: Baby, We Were Born to Run

New research shows that humans became large-brained, large-bodied animals through natural selection. Running appears to have helped us fuel brain growth.

Is Fish Oil Beneficial for the Brain?

All the latest data about mental health and omega-3 fatty acids for dementia, depression, and ultra-high risk of schizophrenia.

Neurobiology of Self-Control in Dogs

By Gregory S. Berns on April 17, 2016 in plus2sd
A new study in dogs trained for MRI shows the part of the brain necessary for impulse control.

Is Love Simply a Puff of Oxytocin?

Bonding is an essential part of social, sexual and family life. How much is this due to one simple chemical in the brain?

The Dangers of a Wandering Mind

We spend almost half of our days lost in aimless thought. Here's how an understanding of mind wandering can lead to greater happiness.

The Data Says "Don't Hug the Dog!"

An analysis of photographs of people affectionately hugging their dogs shows that the majority of the dogs are experiencing stress and anxiety at that moment.

Late Breaking News About Your Mind-Body Health Connection

Hot-off-the-press "Big Data" showing why mental health is crucial for physical health....and vice versa

Babies' Brains May Process Social Thinking Via Motor Systems

A new study published today reports (for the first time) that motor systems in the brain may drive infants' earliest social learning, thinking, and behavior.