Essential Reads

The Neuroscience of Fearful Memories and Avoidance Behaviors

By Christopher Bergland on February 20, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have identified how the brain remembers fearful experiences. And how fear-based memories can lead to avoidance behaviors.

Could Thinking Positively Be Dangerous Right Now?

Have you started opening the newspapers each day with a sense of dread and disbelief about that latest actions of President Trump and his administration?

What is Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

A brain region known as the basal ganglia appears to be important in treating and understanding obsessive compulsive disorder.
Paul Nunez

Are Some Scientists Serious About Denying Free Will?

A brief look at the issues of consciousness and free will.

More Posts on Neuroscience

The timing of free will

By Marc Wittmann Ph.D. on February 18, 2017 in Sense of Time
Why the famous Libet task does not touch on our notion of free will.

5 Tips to Tame Word-Finding Difficulties

Frustrated by word-finding difficulties? Harness the hidden opportunity they provide to boost your brain health.

3 Strategies to Talk With Kids About Suicidal Thoughts

There is no age limit for suicidal thoughts. Parents and healthcare professionals can learn to talk openly and safely with children about suicide.

Experimental Philosophy: Strengths and Limitations

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on February 17, 2017 in Hot Thought
Experimental philosophy is an important movement in which philosophers systematically collect data about how people think. It has 2 main strengths and 3 surmountable limitations.

World's First Clinical Trial Finds Diet Works for Depression

By Georgia Ede MD on February 17, 2017 in Diagnosis: Diet
Groundbreaking research proves that dietary choices have the power to help reduce and even reverse depression.

Have You Found The HERO In Your Team?

When your people are faced with challenges how do they generally respond?
Erik Hans Krause in employ of WPA/PD-US-not renewed

"Refrigerator Mothering" Is Dead but the Blame Game Lives On

By Barb Cohen on February 16, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
The mother—and now the father too—are still suspect. Suspected of what? Nobody knows for sure, but whatever it is, we are expected to defend ourselves against it.
Jens Maus

Brain on Fire

By Stephen Gray Wallace on February 16, 2017 in Decisions Teens Make
Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been called one of the “best known but least understood” mental health conditions. Why is it so well known?

Are Antidepressant Withdrawal Symptoms Worth the Cure?

The lens of depression clouds your everyday view.

Early Brain Over-Growth Is Indicative of Autism as Predicted

The imprinted brain theory links brain growth to autism, and a new study confirms the association.

Interpersonal Rules That Undermine Your Relationships #2

By Amy Banks on February 15, 2017 in Wired For Love
A longstanding myth in our culture is that only the fittest members of society flourish and procreate and that a person's survival and safety is dependent on individual strength.

Joseph LeDoux Reports: Emotions Are “Higher-Order States”

By Christopher Bergland on February 15, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Legendary neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux (who put the amygdala in the spotlight) has an exciting new hypothesis about how the brain processes emotions.

Alzheimer's Disease: Repeating Failures

By Mario D Garrett Ph.D. on February 15, 2017 in iAge
What we have learned from history is that dementia is complex; why are we simplifying the disease again?

Low-Intensity Aerobic Exercise Has Surprising Brain Benefits

By Christopher Bergland on February 14, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
There is growing evidence that low-intensity physical activity has multiple brain benefits. A new study reports that easy aerobic exercise boosts visual sensitivity and perception.

Ignorance Is Not Bliss & Won't Make Concussions Go Away

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on February 13, 2017 in Black Belt Brain
The world? Not flat. Smoking? Causes cancer. Heavy collisions in sport? Cause concussions. Major sports leagues need to stop assessing blame and invest in solutions.

The Neuroscience of Deciding: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

By Christopher Bergland on February 13, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists recently pinpointed how subareas within the prefrontal cortex drive behavior. These findings could lead to new treatments for impulse control disorders such as OCD.

Change-A-Letter Puzzles

By Marcel Danesi Ph.D. on February 13, 2017 in Brain Workout
Try these ten puzzles that will test your verbal skills, getting you to associate verbal memory with the form of words.

Growing Old Gratefully

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on February 12, 2017 in Obesely Speaking
Growing old, what can and cannot be done; and what should and should not be done.

How Exercise Reduces Depression, Anxiety, Cynicism, & Anger

By Matthew MacKinnon MD on February 12, 2017 in Neuraptitude
Exercise may be on par with antidepressants and psychotherapy in the treatment of depression; it even benefits non-pathological mental states as well as reduces mortality.

How to Discern Fake News from Real News

By Marcia Reynolds Psy.D. on February 11, 2017 in Wander Woman
How to weigh your internal assumptions with external "facts" to determine what news you should believe.

Another Limitless Pill Hits the Market. Does It Deliver?

By Richard E. Cytowic M.D. on February 10, 2017 in The Fallible Mind
Drugs that modulate cognition work in those who truly need help. While not intended for healthy brains, some continue to rack up glowing testimonials—especially from journalists.
"Brain Clock"/bzztbomb/CC BY-NC 2.0

Autism, ADHD, and Executive Functioning: Parenting Insights

By Barb Cohen on February 09, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
We have tried visual strategies; we have tried planning discussions; we have tried scripts' we have tried first/then; we have tried IEP goals; and we have tried threats.

Subconscious Fear Exposure Helps Reduce Phobias, Study Finds

By Christopher Bergland on February 09, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A new study reports that a technique called "backward masking" can help arachnophobes reduce their fear of spiders simply by subconsciously viewing images of spiders.

Number One Reason SSRIs Take Four to Six Weeks to Work

It is peculiar that the common antidepressants SSRIs do not kick in for a long time. There is, however, a good scientific explanation of why they do not.

Solving the Problem for Elephants

By G.A. Bradshaw PhD, PhD on February 08, 2017 in Bear in Mind
Captive-held male elephants are underserved by sanctuaries. Here's how the problem is being fixed.

The Sadness of Partisan Polarizing

We mammals evolved to seek the safety of social alliances. Political partisanship makes your inner mammal feel good in the short run but has unpleasant consequences in the long run
Can Stock Photo Inc. /Alexmit, used with permission

Could a Zombie Be Elected President?

Can philosophical zombies tell us something about the deep mystery of consciousness?

Five Secrets to a Stress-Proof Brain

You may want to get rid of stress, but you can’t! But you can learn to accept your stress and transform the way you think about it so you can benefit from its positive aspects.

Is Self-Doubt Holding You Back?

When it comes to your work, are you sitting on a great idea? How can you develop the confidence to be truly innovative at work?

Psychology's Grand Unified Theory

By Gregg Henriques Ph.D. on February 05, 2017 in Theory of Knowledge
A grand unified theory of psychology has been developed.