Essential Reads

It’s Not 'All in Your Head.' It’s in Your Brain.

Why we should not use the term 'psychosomatic'

Can Improv Comedy Treat Social Anxiety?

How learning improv comedy reduces social anxiety for some

How The Internet Tricks You Into Thinking You Are Smarter

We're dependent on the Internet for the answers, and confused about what we know

Recent Posts on Neuroscience

How Does Your Cerebellum Counteract "Paralysis by Analysis"?

By Christopher Bergland on August 04, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists from McGill University have discovered that the cerebellum learns to expect the unexpected and can help counteract "paralysis by analysis" in both life and sport.

Wild and Structured Consciousness

Understanding how attention is related to consciousness requires some knowledge about the philosophical debates on the nature of consciousness, which essentially can be described as being both wild and structured.

People, skills, attitude and money: the 4 Horsemen of Stress

Help I need somebody! Planning whom to call on is a #1 resource for stress.

Welcome to "I Got a Mind to Tell You"

Want the facts about mind, brain, mental and mental disorders. Follow "I Got a Mind to Tell You."

Here's How You Can Become An Expert

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 03, 2015 in Memory Medic
Is there a shortcut to becoming an expert?

It’s Not 'All in Your Head.' It’s in Your Brain.

Current research helps us to understand that some physical illnesses, especially those that are not easily explained, are not made up at all. They are the result of complex neuroendocrine responses due to heredity, trauma and stress. The symptoms are real. They are not all in one’s head.

Can Improv Comedy Treat Social Anxiety?

By Jon Fortenbury on August 02, 2015 in NeuroProgress
People are increasingly turning to improv comedy (theatre made up on the spot) to reduce social anxiety. The reason it's working for some and not all is simple, but powerful.

Eye of the Beholder: The Brain Sabotaging Love

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on August 02, 2015 in Obesely Speaking
Expectations, which are influenced by social norms, filter reality about the world, others, and our selves. As a result we could walk right past Mr. or Ms. Right without ever recognizing them.

How The Internet Tricks You Into Thinking You Are Smarter

By Susan Greenfield Ph.D. on August 02, 2015 in Mind Change
Searching the Internet for information creates an illusion of knowledge, in which we think we are smarter than we really are.

The Brain Mechanics of Rumination and Repetitive Thinking

By Christopher Bergland on August 01, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
A new study from Stanford University helps explain the neuroscience of rumination and repetitive thinking.

Brain's Response to Meditation

With meditation, you have the opportunity to become aware of what causes you stress and condition yourself to react differently. You can learn to let go of negative thoughts, events or interactions.

Still Alice? Still Alzheimer’s

By Joe Pierre M.D. on July 31, 2015 in Psych Unseen
Is there anything nice to say about Alzheimer's disease?

Is Music a Universal Language?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on July 31, 2015 in Talking Apes
Both music and language are universals of the human experience, even though the forms they take vary greatly from culture to culture.

Why Grow and Make Your Own Food? Especially as an Artist?

Why grow and make your own food? Why put it in all those hours slaving under the hot sun, covered with dirt, when you could stroll through an air-conditioned grocery store? Why spend all that time processing milk when there are others who can do it for you? And what does it have to do with being an artist?

Changing Our Brains in a Good Way

Nature can help calm our overactive, multitasking brains.

The Psychological Appeal of Donald Trump

Like Peter Finch in the movie Network and like the American public, Trump is "mad (and rich) as hell and not going to take it anymore!"

Want to Improve Your Cognitive Abilities? Go Climb a Tree!

A new study has discovered that physical activities, such as climbing a tree or balancing on a beam, can dramatically improve cognitive abilities. Why would climbing a tree improve cognitive function and working memory?

Fear and Anxiety Affect the Health and Life Span of Dogs

Research shows that increased levels of certain types of fearfulness in dogs may be associated higher susceptibility to skin diseases and to reduced life span.

Can Artificial Intelligence Make Us Stupid?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on July 29, 2015 in The Human Beast
Changing technology stimulates the brain and increases intelligence. But that may only be true if the technology challenges us. In a world run by intelligent machines, our lives could get a lot simpler. Would that make us less intelligent?

Brain Organoids Show Predicted Epigenetic Effects in Autism

New evidence from cultured brain cells of autistics shows that over-expression of a brain growth gene is critical, just as predicted by the imprinted brain theory.

Steps to Take Today for Better Brain Health Tomorrow

You may be taking proactive steps to support your body’s health, but are you taking similar steps to sustain your brain? When it comes to supporting brain health, the old adage is true: it’s better than never. There’s no time like the present to start supporting your brain.

When Music Becomes Language

By Eliezer J. Sternberg M.D. on July 28, 2015 in NeuroLogic
When jazz musicians achieve the highest levels of mastery, their brain processing undergoes a fundamental change, and they begin to perceive music in a way no one else can.

Music Training Improves Adolescent Brain Development

Music training during adolescence helps the teenage brain hone skills necessary for academic and life success.

Living Closer to the Bone (Part 2)

By Michael Jawer on July 27, 2015 in Feeling Too Much
Evolutionary and behavioral science is giving credence to what Darwin observed and intuited 140 years ago. Studies indicate with a fair degree of certainty that animals have intense experiences comparable to human feelings of joy, anger, love, exuberance, delight, compassion, sorrow, and grief.

Attractiveness Changes Our Perception At an Early Age

Not only does attractiveness influence children's trustworthiness of a person, it even changes how the brain's neural system responds.

Don't Look Directly At The Problem

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on July 27, 2015 in Black Belt Brain
Our species has some special features but people are animals too. In the motor system, we monitor and superimpose on top of many base-level responses our intentions and wishes. By extension, when we are dealing with an issue or a problem, perhaps the best course of action is to not try and directly force a solution and instead allow the best course of action to emerge.

What "Abnormal" Really Means

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on July 27, 2015 in A Sideways View
Most people like to think that they are "normal". But what does it mean to be normal? And if you are not normal does that mean you are abnormal?

News stories with the power of empathy

Depicting physical pain and discomfort may make for compelling journalism, but it also could undermine audiences' empathetic responses and perpetuate what neuroscientists call the 'empathy gap.' Instead, efforts to capture people's emotional suffering may be more likely to evoke empathy, even though that's much trickier for reporters trained to 'show, don't tell.'

An Invaluable Lesson From Elders

Although suffering in life is inevitable, we can mitigate it.

The Neuroscience of Savoring Positive Emotions

Neuroscientists have linked sustained activation of a brain region called the ventral striatum to savoring positive emotions. Ventral striatal activation is in the locus of your control. Researchers believe that regularly practicing loving-kindness meditation and compassion activates this brain region and increases the ability to savor positive emotions.