Essential Reads

There Is More Than Butterflies in Your Stomach

By Emeran Mayer M.D. on August 24, 2016 in Gut Sensations
Is all the hype about the gut microbes, probiotics and certain foods and your brain health really justified? Separating speculations from scientific evidence is crucial

Autistics as Undomesticated Humans

To the extent that humans are a self-domesticated species, autistics can be seen as less domesticated than others.

Video Games Stronger Than Morphine: U.S. Military

The Military has discovered that playing video games can be more effective than morphine in treating combat burn veterans—but what is this digital morphine doing to kids' brains?

Why a Drained Brain Makes Bad Decisions

By David DiSalvo on August 22, 2016 in Neuronarrative
The brain is an energy hog that uses 15-20% of the body’s circulating blood glucose each day, and that energy isn't insignificant when it comes to making sound decisions.

More Posts on Neuroscience

Move the Body, Lift the Mind

The depression-exercise link.

The Immune System and Psychiatry

Recent evidence demonstrates that the immune system plays a central role in regulating brain function.

12 Predictions for 2050

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 24, 2016 in How To Do Life
Some reasons to want to be around at mid-century.

Do Dogs Prefer Food or Praise?

A new study looks at whether dogs prefer food rewards more than social interaction with their owners by monitoring what goes on inside the dogs brain.

What Do Others Want?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on August 23, 2016 in Your Wise Brain
You have to actively look for good intentions. You'll find them all around you - the deep goodness in every being. Practice looking for good intentions that may make you happier.

Is Neuroscience Today's Phrenology?

By Arthur Dobrin D.S.W. on August 22, 2016 in Am I Right?
To reject the findings of science is to choose stupidity; to reject the liberal arts is to choose an immature heart.

5 Ways a New Approach Can Improve Your Life Today

Studies show how humans have shorter attention spans than goldfish. Here's how you can fix that.

Sea of Sadness

By G.A. Bradshaw PhD, PhD on August 20, 2016 in Bear in Mind
For elephants in India, epic social changes are bringing hardships and hope.
og-vision at Bigstock.com

Feed Your Body, Feed Your Brain

By Susan Noonan MD on August 20, 2016 in View From the Mist
Maybe “you are what you eat” is not just an old wives tale?
K.Ramsland

Writers! 5 Ways to Tap Anxiety for Aha!

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on August 20, 2016 in Shadow Boxing
Our brain seeks certainty to avoid anxiety, but being in the presence of uncertainty is where the creative juices flow.

The Neurobiology Behind Breakups

By Rhonda Freeman Ph.D. on August 19, 2016 in NeuroSagacity
The brain's process of detaching from a romantic relationship.

How to Build a Happier Brain in Two Easy Steps

By Meg Selig on August 19, 2016 in Changepower
Learn Rick Hanson's simple two-step process for "hardwiring" positive experiences into your brain so that you can feel happier, calmer, and more confident.

If You Don’t Look Injured, You Must Be Fine

By James F. Zender Ph.D. on August 19, 2016 in The New Normal
What happens to your behavior after a car accident?
www.stocksy.com

Should We Be Playing With Our Well-being?

Wish you had more well-being when it comes to the way you go about your work?

The Neuroscience of Going from Machiavellian to Magnanimous

By Christopher Bergland on August 18, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Why would four U.S. Olympic swimmers fabricate a story about being robbed at gunpoint in Rio de Janeiro? A new Oxford study explains the brain mechanics of self-serving behavior.
Lori Russell-Chapin

Neurofeedback: A Remarkable Counseling Tool

By Lori Russell-Chapin Ph.D. on August 18, 2016 in Brain Waves
Needs a more regulated brain? Neurofeedback may be the answer.

Letter to Young Activists

This post is adapted from a talk recently given to young community organizers about self-care and well-being on the journey to a more compassionate and just society.
https://pixabay.com/en/brain-think-human-idea-20424/

Alluring Brain Science: Stale, Creative Ferment or Both?

Brain science is complex and fast developing. Is it providing the answers we need quickly enough?

Living With Intention

Intention is the power to redirect your thoughts. This power is limited. Here's how to grow it instead of wasting it.

Are We Really So Separate?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on August 16, 2016 in Your Wise Brain
When you love the world, you appreciate and care for it. Each of these actions makes you feel good, they help you preserve and improve everything you depend on: air, food, etc.
www.stocksy.com

Can Organizations Help People Thrive?

Are people thriving in your workplace? Or are busyness, uncertainty, and ambiguity leaving them feeling overwhelmed and burned out?

Primary Affects

What science is really intrigued with is how feelings work. For ages, Tomkins and others grappled with the following question: How are there only a few discrete responses?

3 Rules of Change We Too Often Forget

By Nick Tasler on August 10, 2016 in Strategic Thinking
Sudden change can disorient and confuse us. Fortunately, our brains are insanely well-equipped to handle it.
Lisa Cron

Brain Science for Writers

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on August 10, 2016 in Shadow Boxing
A story coach's new book applies the neuroscience of storytelling in a practical how-to guide for writers.

Are There Any Geniuses in the Field of Psychology?

Does psychology have any geniuses comparable to the geniuses of computer science (such as Alan Turing or Jack Kilby - who won a Nobel prize for inventing the silicon chip)?
L Breuning

Why Winning Feels Good

The facts of our brain’s natural competitiveness have been submerged by a warm and fuzzy view of nature. The truth can help us manage our quirky neurochemical operating system.

Ignoring Social Context in Studies of Borderline Personality

Whether an individual seems to be overly cautious or overly optimistic regarding their expectations of others is determined by experience and learning, not by brain abnormalities.

Mirror, on the Wall, What're the Deepest Wants of All?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on August 09, 2016 in Your Wise Brain
Responsive and Reactive modes of living are the foundation of human nature. We have no choice about the vital aims they serve nor about the brain’s capacity to be in either mode.

The Neuroprotective Powers of Exercise Should Motivate You

By Christopher Bergland on August 06, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Do you need a new source of motivation to become more physically active? If so, there is growing evidence that exercise increases brain size and reduces dementia risk as you age.