Essential Reads

Confessions of a Know-it-All

The illusion of knowledge is an enemy of wonder

What to Do When Your Anxiety Won’t Go Away

How to work your psychological game on the daily.

How Technical Devices Influence Children's Brains

Dangers, delights, 5 do's and 5 don'ts

How Do Scientists Study Dreams?

Technology opens up new ways to observe the dreaming brain.

Recent Posts on Neuroscience

Conversation with a Mother about Sleep Training her Baby

Dear Dr., I need help! I have a lovely 11 month old baby girl and my husband and I both work full-time… I resorted to sleep coaching recently… I am afraid that we have already done irreparable damage to our sweet baby.

The Wacky Neuroscience of Forgetting How to Ride a Bicycle

A new experiment with a "backwards brain bicycle" illustrates how easy it is to forget everything you thought you knew about riding a bicycle. In this blog post, I'll explore the neuroscience behind learning—and forgetting—how to ride a bicycle.

No Way Did I Want to Die

Adolescents want to feel pleasure, takes risks and be social. Add in a brain that is impulsive and emotional and you have a set up for potential addiction. This is a story about just such a teen.

Four Quick Videos On Anticipatory Anxiety And Fear of Flying

A vicious cycle can hold you captive in a state of anticipatory anxiety. The thought of your plane crashing - or of having a panic attack - can trigger the release of stress hormones. Once released, these hormones keep your thinking locked on those thoughts, which, in turn, trigger even more stress hormones. How can you break out of this vicious cycle?

Dog's Brains Are Tuned to Recognize Human Faces

Recent fMRI data shows that dogs' sensitivity to human faces and expressions may be wired into the canine brain.

Confessions of a Know-it-All

The feeling of knowing is an essential brain sensation, without which we would not likely strive to learn. And yet, the feeling of being right is not necessarily connected to actually being correct.

Decision-Making 101

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on May 21, 2015 in Memory Medic
Good decision making depends on selective attention skills. Seniors are better at this than young people, whose culture and schools are making matters worse.

Stroke - Aneurysm Awareness: 11 Effective Treatments

In this article, Dr. Diane explains the 11 different integrative methods that she recommends for treating a stroke and/or aneurysm.

Synchronicity Can Signal Love Moments or Breakthroughs

Creating the environment that allows for you to aware of how synchronicity and its cousin, serendipity, can enrich your life.

Kitchen Therapy: Cooking Up Mental Well-Being

Culinary therapy is the treatment du jour at a growing number of mental health clinics. Here’s why.

How Prescription Pain Meds Hijack Your Brain

In this post, I’d like to explore the science of chronic pain and paint a picture that shows how the brain operates on opiates.

Cannabis Addiction Is Linked to Higher Levels of Cortisol

Heavy marijuana use may trigger a stress response that increases cortisol levels.

Beliefs About Brain Training: Why They Could Be Hurting Us

Can brain training help or hurt? It may depend on your attitude about what you expect to get out of it.

What to Do When Your Anxiety Won’t Go Away

Outsmart your brooding ways with these nine mind games. After all, calm is an inside job.

How Do Drugs Hijack Your Brain?

Occasional use of certain drugs can trigger structural changes in your brain that make some people more likely to become addicts.

How Technical Devices Influence Children's Brains

Guest blog by Dan Riseman, president of Riseman Educational Counseling, covers children's brain development. Here are some dos and don'ts regarding devices.

Mom's Watchful Eyes

Did you know that mom’s watchful eyes can encourage more positive behavior behind the wheel?

Mad Men vs. Hill Street Blues

Which world do you choose?

Solving Humanity’s Emotional Disorders

In the last 1% of human genus existence, mental illness has become rampant. What are we doing wrong?

Do Some Thoughts and Feelings Live Outside our Brain?

Surprising findings in Immunology and Microbiology suggest the answer is....YES.

Did Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Deserve the Death Penalty?

By Joe Pierre M.D. on May 15, 2015 in Psych Unseen
How did jurors decide Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's fate?

How Do Scientists Study Dreams?

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on May 15, 2015 in Sleep Newzzz
Through research that relies on dream reports, scientists have accumulated a rich body of information about the themes and emotions contained in dreams, and about dream narratives.

Losing My Mindfulness: A Tale of Spilled Milk and Blue M&Ms

What I know to be true experientially is what scientific research now proves—that mindfulness meditation literally changes the brain. Take a brief thirty seconds and give it a try. Right here, right now.

Why's It So Hard to Quit Smoking? Neuroscience Has New Clues

Neuroscientists have pinpointed specific brain regions that explain why smoking is one of the hardest habits to kick.

Are You Your Thoughts?

How an objective leader handles negative thoughts

A Simple Way of Reducing Long-Term Stress in Dogs?

An unexpected finding — the simple act of walking your dog can affect its long-term ability to cope with stress.

Wired To Eat For All The Wrong Reasons

If you don’t understand that evolution has wired you to eat sugary carbohydrates in order to self-soothe and calm you, then you will never be able to control your appetite. Find out what role neuroscience plays in our food cravings...

On Being a Subject of Oliver Sacks

: After I experienced a dramatic improvement in my vision, I was asked to participate in several scientific experiments. However, the investigator from whom I learned the most was Oliver Sacks.

The Definitive Way To Respond to Others' Mistakes

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on May 13, 2015 in Feeling It
Mistakes happen. The question is - how should we respond? Research shows that compassion will help us come out ahead.

Should You Confront Your Family?

A child’s desperate need for nurture can drive them to repeat any behavior that appears to get it. Whatever relieved pain in your youth built neural pathways that tell you how to feel good today. You can end up with a self-destructive pattern that’s hard to make sense of. Talking about it breaks the spell, and builds a healthy skill to replace it.