Essential Reads

Regular Aerobic Exercise in Midlife Protects the Aging Brain

By Christopher Bergland on February 24, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Regular aerobic exercise benefits the brain in surprising ways. New research suggests that regular aerobic exercise in midlife can optimize blood flow networks as the brain ages.
Svitlana-ua/Shutterstock

To Sleep, Perhaps to Learn

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in Memory Medic
Odds are the kids in your life are not getting enough sleep. Scientists now know that sleep is needed for "smart forgetting."

Malignant Narcissism: Collision of Two Personality Disorders

By Rhonda Freeman Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in NeuroSagacity
Those who interact with malignant narcissists consider them jealous, petty, thin-skinned, punitive, hateful, cunning, and angry.

The Neuroscience of Fearful Memories and Avoidance Behaviors

By Christopher Bergland on February 20, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have identified how the brain remembers fearful experiences. And how fear-based memories can lead to avoidance behaviors.

More Posts on Neuroscience

If You Go To The Hospital, Get Ready To Yell…

By Peter Edelstein M.D. on February 26, 2017 in Patient Power
Studies show that healthcare in the U.S. is far poorer than most people realize, and sadly, sometimes you need to yell to protect yourself or a loved one. But how do you know?

A New Paradigm for Psychiatry

The UN has put out a call for a new paradigm for psychiatry, “that could replace the failed medical model that dominates mental health today.”

Dreading Something? Tylenol Might Dull the Pain

Dread has been declared the most difficult emotion to tolerate. And researchers have found acetaminophen could actually dull the emotional pain.

The Neuroscience of Wanting and Pleasure

If you feel like you are running out of steam, it is OK! Motivation goes up and down. If the tide was high all the time, we would fail to see the beauty of calm oceans.

Entranced

By Robert J King Ph.D. on February 23, 2017 in Hive Mind
Getting in "sync" with a partner may not be a euphemism. Orgasms can help us achieve this, the latest research implies.

Are There Behavior Changes When Dogs Are Spayed or Neutered?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on February 22, 2017 in Canine Corner
Data shows that spaying or neutering dogs may not reduce behavior problems but actually tends to increase them.

4 Ways to Train Your Brain to Think Like a Champion

Your brain can be your best asset or your worst enemy. It's important to train it well.

Highly Creative People Have Well-Connected Brain Hemispheres

By Christopher Bergland on February 21, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
People who are highly creative have better connectivity between the left and right brain hemispheres, according to a new study by a team of international researchers.

The timing of free will

By Marc Wittmann Ph.D. on February 18, 2017 in Sense of Time
Why the famous Libet task does not touch on our notion of free will.

5 Tips to Tame Word-Finding Difficulties

Frustrated by word-finding difficulties? Harness the hidden opportunity they provide to boost your brain health.

3 Strategies to Talk With Kids About Suicidal Thoughts

There is no age limit for suicidal thoughts. Parents and healthcare professionals can learn to talk openly and safely with children about suicide.

Experimental Philosophy: Strengths and Limitations

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on February 17, 2017 in Hot Thought
Experimental philosophy is an important movement in which philosophers systematically collect data about how people think. It has 2 main strengths and 3 surmountable limitations.

World's First Clinical Trial Finds Diet Works for Depression

By Georgia Ede MD on February 17, 2017 in Diagnosis: Diet
Groundbreaking research proves that dietary choices have the power to help reduce and even reverse depression.

Have You Found The HERO In Your Team?

When your people are faced with challenges how do they generally respond?
Erik Hans Krause in employ of WPA/PD-US-not renewed

"Refrigerator Mothering" Is Dead but the Blame Game Lives On

By Barb Cohen on February 16, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
The mother—and now the father too—are still suspect. Suspected of what? Nobody knows for sure, but whatever it is, we are expected to defend ourselves against it.
Jens Maus

Brain on Fire

By Stephen Gray Wallace on February 16, 2017 in Decisions Teens Make
Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been called one of the “best known but least understood” mental health conditions. Why is it so well known?

Are Antidepressant Withdrawal Symptoms Worth the Cure?

The lens of depression clouds your everyday view.

Early Brain Over-Growth Is Indicative of Autism as Predicted

The imprinted brain theory links brain growth to autism, and a new study confirms the association.

Interpersonal Rules That Undermine Your Relationships #2

By Amy Banks on February 15, 2017 in Wired For Love
A longstanding myth in our culture is that only the fittest members of society flourish and procreate and that a person's survival and safety is dependent on individual strength.

Joseph LeDoux Reports: Emotions Are “Higher-Order States”

By Christopher Bergland on February 15, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Legendary neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux (who put the amygdala in the spotlight) has an exciting new hypothesis about how the brain processes emotions.

Alzheimer's Disease: Repeating Failures

By Mario D Garrett Ph.D. on February 15, 2017 in iAge
What we have learned from history is that dementia is complex; why are we simplifying the disease again?

Low-Intensity Aerobic Exercise Has Surprising Brain Benefits

By Christopher Bergland on February 14, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
There is growing evidence that low-intensity physical activity has multiple brain benefits. A new study reports that easy aerobic exercise boosts visual sensitivity and perception.

Ignorance Is Not Bliss & Won't Make Concussions Go Away

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on February 13, 2017 in Black Belt Brain
The world? Not flat. Smoking? Causes cancer. Heavy collisions in sport? Cause concussions. Major sports leagues need to stop assessing blame and invest in solutions.

The Neuroscience of Deciding: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

By Christopher Bergland on February 13, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists recently pinpointed how subareas within the prefrontal cortex drive behavior. These findings could lead to new treatments for impulse control disorders such as OCD.
ESB Professional/Shutterstock

10 Classic Word Puzzles to Challenge Your Verbal Brain

By Marcel Danesi Ph.D. on February 13, 2017 in Brain Workout
Try these ten puzzles that will test your verbal skills, getting you to associate verbal memory with the form of words.

Growing Old Gratefully

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on February 12, 2017 in Obesely Speaking
Growing old, what can and cannot be done; and what should and should not be done.

How Exercise Reduces Depression, Anxiety, Cynicism, & Anger

By Matthew MacKinnon MD on February 12, 2017 in Neuraptitude
Exercise may be on par with antidepressants and psychotherapy in the treatment of depression; it even benefits non-pathological mental states as well as reduces mortality.

How to Discern Fake News from Real News

By Marcia Reynolds Psy.D. on February 11, 2017 in Wander Woman
How to weigh your internal assumptions with external "facts" to determine what news you should believe.

Another Limitless Pill Hits the Market. Does It Deliver?

By Richard E. Cytowic M.D. on February 10, 2017 in The Fallible Mind
Drugs that modulate cognition work in those who truly need help. While not intended for healthy brains, some continue to rack up glowing testimonials—especially from journalists.
"Brain Clock"/bzztbomb/CC BY-NC 2.0

Autism, ADHD, and Executive Functioning: Parenting Insights

By Barb Cohen on February 09, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
We have tried visual strategies; we have tried planning discussions; we have tried scripts' we have tried first/then; we have tried IEP goals; and we have tried threats.