Essential Reads

Is Psychological Science Bad Science?

Psychology researchers failed to replicate over half of 100 published studies.

Prions, Memory and PTSD

A conversation with Nobel prize winning neuroscientist Dr. Eric R. Kandel

Dogs Avoid People Who Are Not Cooperative with Their Owners

Dogs don't like people who are unhelpful or uncooperative to their loved ones

What's Wrong with Antianxiety Drugs?

A possible path towards better options

Recent Posts on Neuroscience

Does a Resting Mind Correspond to the Brain's Default Mode?

The resting mind may correspond to a "default mode network" found in brain scans, so being in the moment might parallel a built-in biological pause for neural refreshment.

The Traumatized Brain

A new blog about brain injury from the authors of the upcoming book, The Traumatized Brain: A Family Guide to Understanding Mood, Memory, and Behavior after Brain Injury.

Assembling Your Innovation Advisory Board

By Jeff DeGraff Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Innovation You
Conflict is inevitable when you put such a wide variety of perspectives on one advisory board—and that's a good thing.

Is it Normal to ‘Hear Voices’?

By Joe Pierre M.D. on August 31, 2015 in Psych Unseen
Hearing voices can be a normal experience, but what are auditory hallucinations and what does hearing them mean?

Listening to Your Inner Voice

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Media Spotlight
Inner speech is far more important than most people realize. From early childhood onward, inner speech plays a vital role in regulating how we think and behave. Not only does it often allow us to "rehearse" different scenarios and enables us to avoid rash actions, but inner speech may be essential to memory and self-awareness as well.

What Is Love?

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Hot Thought
The best way to state the nature of love is to identify standard examples, typical features, and explanatory roles. Love is an emotion consisting of patterns of neural firing that represent a lover, a loved one, intense feelings, and caring behavior, all tied to chemical changes in the brain.

Are You a Feeler, Doer, or Thinker?

By Leon Pomeroy Ph.D. on August 29, 2015 in Beyond Good and Evil
What no other words can tell me so clearly

What Constitutes Real Science?

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on August 29, 2015 in Obesely Speaking
"Say it ain't so Joe!": Science and Nature both question the scientific validity of over half of the published psychology research.

Mass Shootings and Mass Media

By Helen M Farrell M.D. on August 29, 2015 in Frontpage Forensics
It is easy for violent acts to become sensationalized in the age of social media and live streaming. It's important to recognize the negative impact of tantalizing news stories to our brains and use our technological tools to enhance community support.

Is Psychological Science Bad Science?

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on August 28, 2015 in Good Thinking
In the largest replication effort to date, researchers could not replicate over half of the psychology studies targeted. Here is why that doesn't spell doom for psychological science.

The Superhuman Athlete

Find out how Olga Kotelko stays fit physically and mentally at the age of 95.

Can Science Tell us Anything about the Soul?

By Julien Musolino Ph.D. on August 27, 2015 in Soul Fallacy
Science gives us every reason to think that the soul, like the Emperor’s new clothes in Andersen’s famous tale, is a fiction.

Stereotypical Gender Differences in Sexuality Are Crumbling

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on August 27, 2015 in The Human Beast
Marked differences between male and female sexuality used to be supported by solid evidence around the globe. The trouble is that such distinctions are getting blurred in developed countries.

On-Air Shooting Raises Specter of "Bullying"

Before we are content to establish Flanagan’s ‘underlying mental instability,’ or situate the tragedy at the intersection of graphic video games and life, we must consider the ways in which our culture is fast paced and unforgiving.

Why Are Today’s College Students So Emotionally Fragile?

Brain research reveals why controlling parents stunt their children's growth.

Prions, Memory and PTSD

By Shaili Jain M.D. on August 26, 2015 in The Aftermath of Trauma
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has been described as a disorder of memory. It has become quite apparent that there are two types of memory in PTSD. The work of Eric R. Kandel forms the basis for much of what we understand about how memories are formed.

Why Does Physical Activity Improve Cognitive Flexibility?

By Christopher Bergland on August 25, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
People who are physically active tend be better at thinking outside the box. Why is this? New research from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign offers some valuable clues.

Dogs Avoid People Who Are Not Cooperative with Their Owners

New data shows that dogs, like young human children, continually watch the social interactions going on around them and use information from what they observe to decide who to avoid in the future.

Why America Can’t Read

Advanced research in cognitive science including brain scan science is demonstrating that explicit spelling instruction may be the missing link to reading success in America where sixty-five percent of fourth graders read below proficiency levels.

The Superhuman Mind

It is possible to acquire extraordinary cognitive skills after brain injury. But it is, of course, unwise to bang your head against a wall and hope you do it the right way and become a genius. But there are other shortcuts to develop extraordinary skills without engaging in any kind of wild and risky behaviors.

Psychotherapy as a Learning Experience

Therapy is a learning experience. Perhaps findings from the neuroscience of learning and memory can suggest ways to improve the storage of memories that are formed during a therapy session.

Poison Apple: Technology Fads Make Your Kids Dumber

Students have confused the ability to look up a fact with actual knowledge.They can Google the who, what, and when, but can't explain "why."

Creative Rehabilitation, Part 4: Dementia

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on August 22, 2015 in Trouble in Mind
Creative and individualized strategies to help a person with dementia retain some dignity and reasons for living are feasible in the early and mid-way stages of the disease, and support and therapy can help family members cope when their loved one is alive, as well as make the grieving process less painful.

This Is Your Brain On College Football

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on August 21, 2015 in Obesely Speaking
Beyond Social Tribalism, BIRGing, CORFing, and Tailgating - the brain needs its football.

Brain Healthy Snacks to Enjoy at Your Desk

Learn about snacks that you can eat at your desk while at work that will keep your brain in tip-top shape!

How Dogs Show Us What Is Happening in the World

Dogs have developed a behavioral technique that involves directing the attention of humans to objects in the world that may be of interest.

Walk in Nature: Good for Brain, Good for Spirit

By Azadeh Aalai Ph.D. on August 20, 2015 in The First Impression
How can exposure to nature enrich our brain and mental health?

Why Does Overthinking Sabotage the Creative Process?

By Christopher Bergland on August 19, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have identified why overthinking can undermine the creative process.

Screentime Is Making Kids Moody, Crazy and Lazy

By Victoria L. Dunckley M.D. on August 18, 2015 in Mental Wealth
By disrupting sleep, suppressing the brain's frontal lobe, raising stress hormones, and fracturing attention, daily screen-time is making children become the worst version of themselves.

Is "Instant Addiction" Real?

Is it possible for someone to become instantly addicted to a drug? Most people might say no. Eventually, once individuals have used the drug enough, their brain begins to lose the ability to function without it. What if they try the drug once and know immediately they are hooked, and that the urge to use will likely never leave?