Essential Reads

The Pull of Old Habits

How the brain gets stuck in harmful patterns

Music's Effects on Cognitive Function of the Elderly

"Where there is life there is music. Where there is music, there is life."

Can Women Ever Be Taken Seriously?

It’s tough, but not impossible, for women to communicate a powerful image

One More Reason to Unplug Before Bedtime

Reading a bedtime story improves a child's brain function and mental imagery.

Recent Posts on Neuroscience

Geography of Aging and the Illusion of Self

By Mario D Garrett PhD on May 04, 2015 in iAge
There is no "me". My body is a fusion of the outside world and an internal reality. The distinction between me and them is purely a creation of my mind. The separation comes as an afterthought. My mind creates this dualism, but in reality my body is fused with the geography and behavior of others around. The sense of self is how the body placates me.

What Triggers Cravings?

What is the most effective way to eliminate cravings and stop the cycle of addictive behavior? This post offers new advice based on the latest cutting-edge scientific research.

Neurofeedback as a Treatment for Parkinson’s Disease

April was Parkinson’s Awareness Month, which prompted me to share this story and an effective, yet little-known treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD).

Five Year Synthesis: Start Here Post

Simple whole foods, both plant and animal, are best for the brain for some obvious reasons and some you won't expect. Good food and good sleep are lacking in our modern world, yet our mental health can depend upon them.

Neuroscientists Confirm That Strangers Can Become Ourselves

Your brain has the ability to transfer your sense of self into the physical body of a stranger.

Teach Someone to Prioritize Using Psychological Distance

You may be tempted to write off some team members as never being able to manage themselves. They may be great at execution, but the level of handholding they need about what actually has to get done is frustrating. It would be ideal if there were a way to get everyone on a work team to be thinking about the big picture.

Does Harry Potter Have the Power to Wipe Out Prejudice?

According to a recent study, young people who identify with Harry Potter are less likely to be prejudiced against minority groups.

Tame Your Sabotaging Self-Talk, Part 1

You may have heard the expression “monkey mind,” which refers to the way that our minds are all over the place. To learn more about how to be present with the inner chaos, I turned to Arnie Kozak, Ph.D., mindfulness expert and author of The Awakened Introvert.

Junk Food, Gut, and Brain

People who eat mostly whole foods, meaning minimally processed foods that don’t need a label to tell you what is in it, tend to have better mental health. Why is that the case? It could be due to how these foods affect the gut. A new study shows how dramatic and rapid the changes in gut can be.

The Pull of Old Habits

By Alex Korb Ph.D. on May 01, 2015 in PreFrontal Nudity
When the seatbelt broke in my car, I got a lesson in how the brain controls habits, and how those habits can control your life.

Video vs Text: The Brain Perspective

They say video killed the radio star. The question is: Did it also kill the print star? And what does the answer mean for online content marketing?

Is surfing the Internet addictive?

By Susan Greenfield Ph.D. on April 30, 2015 in Mind Change
New research shows that aimless, excessive Internet use is associated with changes in the brain consistent with addictions. What could be addictive about endlessly surfing the web?

Music's Effects on Cognitive Function of the Elderly

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 30, 2015 in Memory Medic
Music can be therapy for old age.

Will Sleep Apnea Give Me Alzheimer's?

In dreams begin realities—but to remember stuff you need to sleep effectively.

Optogenetics Allow Neuroscientists to Turn Fear Off and On

Neuroscientists at MIT have discovered how to turn the neural circuitry of fear conditioning on and off. This could lead to better treatments for PTSD, anxiety disorders, and avoidance learning.

Your Brain Never Stops Playing the Confidence Game

By David DiSalvo on April 29, 2015 in Neuronarrative
We seem to be equipped with a way to detect the level of confidence embedded in others’ voices, and even a loud tone—if lacking the confidence intangible—isn’t likely to cause much more than irritation.

Does Training Make Your Dog Smarter?

Dogs that have been trained to high levels of performance in any of a number of skills (e.g., agility, schutzhund, search and rescue, retrieving, musical freestyle, etc.) become better problem solvers on totally unrelated tasks.

Suicide Alert: The Spring Season Can Be Deadly

Suicide Alert: Springtime can be a deadly season.

Why Are Cannabis Users Susceptible to Memory Distortion?

A new study reports that chronic cannabis use can make imaginary memories seem like reality.

Can Women Ever Be Taken Seriously?

Gravitas, or the assertion of power through body language, is a concept usually associated with men. However, it is possible under the right circumstances for women to have a piece of the power dynamic pie.

Can Orange Glasses Improve Sleep Quality? Testing it Out

By Jordan Gaines Lewis on April 28, 2015 in Brain Babble
Can orange-tinted glasses improve sleep quality by blocking out blue light? I did an experiment.

Heading toward First Human Head Transplant?

If “head transplant” sounds like the stuff of science fiction, think again. The possibility for such an operation seems to be drawing ever nearer. The surgeon is ready and a suitable patient has volunteered.

One More Reason to Unplug Before Bedtime

How does being "plugged in" to an electronic device impact a young child's developing brain?

Change Your Brain With Kindness

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on April 27, 2015 in Urban Survival
Practicing a loving kindness meditation allows you to be gentle and compassionate to yourself and also the people around you. The practice not only can bring more positivity into your life but also can actually change your brain.

Mapping Altered States of Consciousness

Lucid dreaming seems far closer to waking than to deep sleep but what does this mean? Could we ever map states of consciousness and understand the relationships between them?

The Personality Transplant

By Erica Sonnenburg Ph.D. on April 26, 2015 in The Good Gut
There is an information super highway that connects our brain and our gut called the brain-gut axis. Recent evidence indicates that our gut microbes are tapping into this axis and influencing our brain and behavior.

Real Psychiatry and Darwinian Evolution are One and the Same

The basic principle for the development of human personality is at one with Darwinian evolution. Psychotherapy is the treatment that addresses the human issues in precisely the way they were constructed in the first place.

Sitting Can Drain Brain Power and Stifle Creativity

Sitting has become an epidemic. Not only does sitting increase health risks and obesity—sitting can also stifle creative thinking and disrupt cognitive engagement.

The Science of Betrayal

A betrayal by someone you trust is one of the most challenging interpersonal situations you can face in life. Whether through infidelity or a failure to fulfill a promise, betrayal leads to a desire for revenge, particularly in some people. New neuroscience research suggests who’s most likely to be hurt by a betrayal and why.

Your 6th Sense

Scientific reasons why you can trust "extrasensory" perceptions