Essential Reads

The Neuroscience of Betrayal

This is your brain on betrayal

Your Brain's Trash Bin: What's in It and Why

How you throw most of your life away

Does Emotional Attachment to an Owner Change in Older Dogs?

Research shows that older dogs appear to be less emotionally secure.

Analyzing Analysts

Shrinks documents psychiatry's new focus on medical treatments of mental illness

Recent Posts on Neuroscience

The Neuroscience of Betrayal

A betrayal by someone you trust is one of the most challenging interpersonal situations you can face in life. Whether through infidelity or a failure to fulfill a promise, betrayal leads to a desire for revenge, particularly in some people. New neuroscience research suggests who’s most likely to be hurt by a betrayal and why.

Changing Minds

By Susan R Barry Ph.D. on April 24, 2015 in Eyes on the Brain
Can a few hours of watching a 3D movie overcome a lifetime of deficient stereovision? Just how plastic is the adult brain?

Meditation Improves Brain Function

There is a great deal of evidence that meditation, in particular mindfulness meditation, improves the brain, and the research is teaching us a lot about how and why that happens.

The Shocking Truth about ECT

By Julie K Hersh on April 24, 2015 in Struck By Living
Should the media be reporting on medical treatments when they lack the time and expertise to fully present information?

Why Is Air Pollution So Bad for Your Brain?

Air pollution has long been associated with health risks including asthma and an increased risk of stroke. New findings show that air pollution also damages the human brain.

Men Lose Their Memory Faster With Age

By Temma Ehrenfeld on April 23, 2015 in Open Gently
Men lose their memory faster than women.

Walking to Boost Creativity

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on April 23, 2015 in The Human Beast
We are all familiar with the health problems caused by obesity. These problems are peculiar to a modern sedentary way of life and are virtually unknown in physically active subsistence societies. Now evidence builds that physical activity is crucial for brain health, and even for creativity.

Returning to an Unchanged Place Reveals How You Have Changed

Returning to a place from your past that remains unchanged can reveal how you've evolved and give you clues as to where you should go with your life from here.

I Feel Your Pain: The Neuroscience of Empathy

Mirror neurons help us detect pain and emotion in others and evidence that empathy has biological roots.

Healthy Gut, Healthy Brain

By Gary L Wenk Ph. D. on April 23, 2015 in Your Brain on Food
The bugs in your gut can positively or negatively influence your mental function and stress response; it is definitely worth your effort to keep them very happy with a healthy diet.

Is Your Cell Phone Conscious? On Information Integration

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on April 23, 2015 in Hot Thought
The theory that consciousness is just information integration suffers from vagueness, mathematical problems, naïve claims about self-evidence, and misattribution of consciousness to entities such as smartphones.So it is less plausible than alternate theories that explain consciousness as the result of brain mechanisms.

The Perfect Storm: Twitter, Marijuana and the Teen Brain

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on April 23, 2015 in Singletons
Young Twitter users favor marijuana. Teen Twitter chatter about “pot” is high and influential for the risk-prone teenage brain. Twitter, marijuana and the developing teenage brain create the potential for a perfect storm.

Apple Watch or Apple MD?

If the body is information, is living better through quicker information?

Your Brain's Trash Bin: What's in It and Why

Emptying mental garbage can save your life

What Does the Dog's Gaze Do?

By Mark Derr on April 22, 2015 in Dog's Best Friend
Japanese researchers make a lofty claim for what staring into your dog's eyes does to you and your dog.

Prime Your Child’s Reading & Math Development with Patterns

Patterning refers to the meaningful process of organizing, coding, and categorizing information in the brain. It is through the patterns constructed and stored in neural networks that our brains recognize and find relevance in the millions of bits of sensory input received every second. Your child’s early experiences sorting, categorizing and patterning are key.

How Not to Be Boring: Advice for Teen Introverts

By Sophia Dembling on April 22, 2015 in The Introvert's Corner
Teens crave and seem to admire risk taking. What can introverted teens do to scratch that itch?

10 Ways Mindfulness and Meditation Promote Well-Being

This post includes a "Top Ten" list of ways that mindfulness and meditation promote well-being based on the latest scientific research.

Addiction: A Systems Perspective

By Dan Mager MSW on April 21, 2015 in Some Assembly Required
The dynamics of systems theory and neuroplasticity can provide valuable windows through which we can better understand the respective processes that contribute to addiction and recovery.

Does Emotional Attachment to an Owner Change in Older Dogs?

Although older dogs may appear to be more placid and less emotionally responsive, physiological measures show that this is not the case. They may actually be reacting to stress to a greater degree than they did when they were younger.

What Languages Do Bilinguals Count In?

Is it true that bilinguals always count in their first language? And if so, are bilingual children at a disadvantage if they study math in a second language? New brain studies suggest that bilinguals are more flexible than previously thought.

Analyzing Analysts

In Shrinks, Jeffrey Lieberman reviews psychiatry's "tumultuous history," and its current emphasis on the medical treatment of mental illnesses. He maintains that psychiatry fares best when it avoids the extremes of reductionist neurobiology and the psychodynamic element in existential disease. That said, Shrinks does not address important questions about talk therapy.

Power Naps Help Your Hippocampus Consolidate Memories

Taking a power nap helps your hippocampus consolidate memories and helps you seize the day.

The Trillions of Mouths You Feed Each Day

By Erica Sonnenburg Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in The Good Gut
It’s a humbling experience to realize that humans, with our highly evolved, complex brain that can build towering skyscrapers and compose fine works of art, are, in essence, a bacteria-filled tube. But when they are not staving off disease, what are all these microbes doing there? Eating.

How We Frame Emotions Through Facial Expressions

How our faces express emotions is a moving window into our minds.

Medical Model? Recovery Model? No Problem

By Stephen Seager M.D. on April 20, 2015 in BrainTalk
Regarding the treatment of serious mental Illness, there is currently a fundamental rift between two camps: the Medical Model and the Recovery Model.

What are Learning Styles?

By Phil Newton on April 20, 2015 in From Mouse to Man
What are Learning Styles? Should educators be using them? Do they work? Do they even exist? Do they matter?

Congress Should Declare That Mice Are Animals - Now!

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in Animals and Us
In 2002, Congress declared that mice and rats and birds are not animals. A new study by PETA shows why it's time to change Federal animal protection statutes.

Are Athletes Good Role Models?

Being a sport superstar doesn’t automatically qualify a person to be a role model. What are the credentials for the job?

All Psychology Is Evolutionary Psychology

‘Evolutionary psychology’ is a redundancy, in that all psychology is evolutionary psychology. I mean this in the same sense that all anatomy is ‘evolutionary anatomy'.