Essential Reads

Prions, Memory and PTSD

A conversation with Nobel prize winning neuroscientist Dr. Eric R. Kandel

Memories of Trauma

Do people vividly remember—or repress—memories of life-threatening events?

Why Are Optimists Smiling? Are They Blind to Reality?

Understanding a person's outlook on life through early recollections

Objects and Memories...and the Pain of Letting Go

Isn't That the Essential Story, Not Only for Clutterbugs and Hoarders?

Recent Posts on Memory

Using Good Memory Habits to Boost Your Memory

We all make memory mistakes from time to time. In this posting, we talk about a strategy to help with common memory problems, a strategy that is a lot like Grandma’s advice … a pearl of wisdom based not so much on hard scientific evidence but proven through years of experience.

The Traumatized Brain

A new blog about brain injury from the authors of the upcoming book, The Traumatized Brain: A Family Guide to Understanding Mood, Memory, and Behavior after Brain Injury.

Listening to Your Inner Voice

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on August 31, 2015 in Media Spotlight
Inner speech is far more important than most people realize. From early childhood onward, inner speech plays a vital role in regulating how we think and behave. Not only does it often allow us to "rehearse" different scenarios and enables us to avoid rash actions, but inner speech may be essential to memory and self-awareness as well.

The Burden of the Past

By Susan Hooper on August 28, 2015 in Detours and Tangents
I have been blessed with a good memory. But recently I decided to spend less time rummaging through my past and more time looking toward my future.

20 Secrets of Successful Students

Some are common sense, some counterintuitive and all guaranteed to help you get the 'A'.

Dreams Can Help You Solve Problems

By Michelle Carr on August 26, 2015 in Dream Factory
Several authors have shown that current emotional problems are frequently incorporated into dreams, and further, dreaming may provide creative solutions to these problems.

Prions, Memory and PTSD

By Shaili Jain M.D. on August 26, 2015 in The Aftermath of Trauma
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has been described as a disorder of memory. It has become quite apparent that there are two types of memory in PTSD. The work of Eric R. Kandel forms the basis for much of what we understand about how memories are formed.

Memories of Trauma

By David Myers on August 26, 2015 in Talk Psych
Imagine yourself as a traumatized passenger on a transatlantic flight that has run out of fuel and is seemingly destined to crash in the ocean. Such was the real life experience of psychologist Margaret MacKinnon, who, with colleagues, later compared passengers' memories with actual flight events. Their findings teach us a lesson about human memory.

Why Does Physical Activity Improve Cognitive Flexibility?

By Christopher Bergland on August 25, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
People who are physically active tend be better at thinking outside the box. Why is this? New research from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign offers some valuable clues.

Why Are Optimists Smiling? Are They Blind to Reality?

By Arthur J. Clark Ed.D. on August 25, 2015 in Dawn of Memories
Understanding a Person's Outlook on Life Through Early Recollections

Psychotherapy as a Learning Experience

Therapy is a learning experience. Perhaps findings from the neuroscience of learning and memory can suggest ways to improve the storage of memories that are formed during a therapy session.

Objects and Memories...and the Pain of Letting Go

By Barry Yourgrau on August 24, 2015 in Mess
The Pain of Letting Go

Poison Apple: Technology Fads Make Your Kids Dumber

Students have confused the ability to look up a fact with actual knowledge.They can Google the who, what, and when, but can't explain "why."

Creative Rehabilitation, Part 4: Dementia

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on August 22, 2015 in Trouble in Mind
Creative and individualized strategies to help a person with dementia retain some dignity and reasons for living are feasible in the early and mid-way stages of the disease, and support and therapy can help family members cope when their loved one is alive, as well as make the grieving process less painful.

Why Does Overthinking Sabotage the Creative Process?

By Christopher Bergland on August 19, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have identified why overthinking can undermine the creative process.

The Rwandan Genocide

What were you doing on the afternoon of April 7, 1994? You probably have no idea – unless you were getting married, lost a loved one or experiencing another major life event. If you were in Rwanda, you may have been watching your mother, father, brother or sister being slaughtered and expecting to be next.

Unconscious Memories Hide In the Brain but Can Be Retrieved

By Christopher Bergland on August 17, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Researchers at Northwestern University have identify a unique brain mechanism used to store and retrieve unconscious memories.

Exploring the Good Kind of Disobedience

By John P. Schuster on August 17, 2015 in The Power of Your Past
Intelligent Disobedience. I recommend this book to all of us interested in the implications of the Hoffman Report, and to everyone not in psychology but interested in human courage in the face of collective evil.

What's Wrong with Antianxiety Drugs?

Recognition of the multiplicity of the brain systems that contribute to fear and anxiety disorders is the first step towards the development of better treatments.

Recent Research on REM Sleep Functions

By Patrick McNamara Ph.D. on August 16, 2015 in Dream Catcher
REM has been shown to be genetically determined and important for emotional memory.

The Judy Fund: Fighting To Keep The Memories

By Greg O'Brien on August 12, 2015 in On Pluto
It is the spirit of The Judy Fund that offers the greatest promise of igniting awareness to the staggering number of women afflicted with Alzheimer’s.

Why You Cannot Remember What You Did While You Were Drunk

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on August 12, 2015 in Good Thinking
Social drinking can cause memory blackouts. Here's why.

The Crucial Benefit of Good Sleep You Might Be Forgetting

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on August 11, 2015 in Sleep Newzzz
Well rested, you’re more likely to feel better, perform better, and to remember more.

The Amygdala Is NOT the Brain's Fear Center

The amygdala is not a "fear" center out of which effuses the feeling of being afraid. "Fear" is a cognitively assembled conscious experience that is based on threat detection, arousal, attention, perception, memory, and other neural processes.

A Magical Elixir for the Mind

By Gary L Wenk Ph. D. on August 09, 2015 in Your Brain on Food
The fact that science has not yet invented a true brain enhancer has not stopped people from selling magical elixirs on the TV and internet.

Intelligence: One Thing or Many?

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on August 07, 2015 in A Sideways View
Do you trust the data—and there is lots of it—for general intelligence (g) or multiple intelligence? Or have we simply gone too far in our daily "discoveries" of different types of intelligence?

How Does Your Cerebellum Counteract "Paralysis by Analysis"?

By Christopher Bergland on August 04, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists from McGill University have discovered that the cerebellum learns to expect the unexpected and can help counteract "paralysis by analysis" in both life and sport.

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