Essential Reads

The Flynn Effect as Adaptive Change

Our brains rise to the challenges of modern life thereby boosting intelligence.

Cooperation Is Natural

The parties in the Iran nuclear negotiations should take a break in nature.

Socioeconomic Factors Impact a Child's Brain Structure

Family income and parental education are linked to a child's brain development.

The Benefits of Embracing the Ordinary

Why you should take the time to capture the mundane in your everyday life

Recent Posts on Memory

The Flynn Effect as Adaptive Change

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on April 01, 2015 in The Human Beast
All living creatures can change to fit in with their environment. Some of that flexibility is due to gene selection but a lot is developmental. The Flynn effect of rising IQ in developed countries is an enrichment effect of modern life. It arises due to the adaptive response of our brain to the increased challenges it faces.

Mindfulness Practices in 5 Minutes or Less

7 simple mindfulness exercises you can do every day.

Study Folly?

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on April 01, 2015 in In Excess
One of the more interesting types of Culture Bound Syndromes is Brain Fag Syndrome (BFS). The symptoms are such as to prevent students from carrying on with their work and include various unpleasant head symptoms, memory loss, visual difficulties, inability to concentrate, and inability to write. But is this real and what does the psychological literature say?

Suicide's Undertow

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on April 01, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
Kathryn Craft experienced an intense suicide standoff; she has processed the trauma through a tense and well-paced novel.

Boyhood

By Elaine Reese Ph.D. on March 31, 2015 in Tell Me a Story
Richard Linklater's film Boyhood beautifully illustrates milestones in child and adolescent development. The film is required watching for all students of child development, as well as for all parents.

14 Prompts to Help You Start Communicating About Sex

Most people know that communication is a healthy and necessary part of any sexual relationship. But let’s face it—sex is tough to talk about! Many people have never talked about sex openly in their relationship, so they don’t even know where to start. My favorite way to teach couples to start communicating about sex is by using prompts.

Cooperation Is Natural

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on March 31, 2015 in The Green Mind
Nature contact facilitates mental and physical development, improves learning, makes us more cooperative, and promotes pro-environmental choices. These are the qualities we need for a prosperous society and that negotiators in tough negotiations need for positive results.

Discover the Joy of Missing Out

Turn down the noise from our wired world to reconnect with your true self and your true life.

Trying to See the Items for the Means

A pitfall for researchers to avoid.

Socioeconomic Factors Impact a Child's Brain Structure

In the largest study of its kind, a team of investigators from nine different universities have identified a correlative link between family income and a child’s brain structure.

Think You Know What Your Dog Is Feeling? No, You Don't.

By Peg Streep on March 31, 2015 in Tech Support
Dog owners universally ascribe complex emotions to their furry companions. But what's really going on? Do dogs feel what we think they feel or are we all just projecting?

A Prayer for My Aunt

By Susan Hooper on March 30, 2015 in Detours and Tangents
My mother's younger sister often seemed angry with the world. In her last months, as she battled the physical and mental indignities of old age, I saw a new sweetness of character, along with the iron strength that had sustained her through her life's tribulations.

7 Science-Based Reasons to Laugh Every Chance You Get!

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on March 30, 2015 in Feeling It
Go on, rent that comedy! Laughter has more benefits than you even know!

Can We Reverse Cognitive Decline?

By Katherine Bouton on March 30, 2015 in What I Hear
Good brain health is the bottom line. Now we just have to figure out how to preserve that health in those with hearing loss.

Leaving our Legacies Mindfully

By Thelma Duffey Ph.D. on March 30, 2015 in Works in Progress
We have choice to make when it comes to leaving an impact on others. It is important to live life and invest in those who care about you, while keeping in mind the legacy we want to leave.

Can You Stop Thinking?

By Steve Taylor Ph.D. on March 30, 2015 in Out of the Darkness
Why do our minds chatter away so much? Why involuntary mental chatter is bad for us, and how can we quieten it.

Night Terror

By John Cline Ph.D. on March 29, 2015 in Sleepless in America
Sleep terrors are a type of parasomnia that arise out of non-rapid eye movement sleep and involve intense fight-or-flight reactions. They are not nightmares, which occur during rapid eye movement sleep. They are usually not remembered by the person having the sleep terror but are hard to forget for the people nearby who are awakened by the frightening sound of screams.

Why Candy Crush Is Like Life

By Matthew Hutson on March 29, 2015 in Psyched!
Candy Crush is a lot like life. I don’t mean to say life is just a grid of colorful confections waiting to be destroyed by your pointer finger; I mean to say they both rely on the same set of cognitive processes. Here’s a rundown.

Fear the Future

By James Sherlock on March 29, 2015 in Ape Expectations
In our modern world, anxiety is a burden to many. In our past, however, it may have been the difference between life and death.

Don’t Forget to Remember

Memory isn't just about dwelling in the past. Prospective memory is intimately involved in planning and goal-setting for the future. Remembering to remember is fraught with challenges. Lists, post it notes, strings around fingers, knotted handkerchiefs? How do you remember to remember?

What do Children Think about Love?

A group of over thirty preschoolers and kindergarteners were asked what they thought of the word “love.” While younger children were primarily focused on an external conceptual line of thinking, the older children had moved to one that was more internally based.

The Benefits of Embracing the Ordinary

By Amie M. Gordon PhD on March 27, 2015 in Between You and Me
What would you rather do, write down the last conversation you had or watch a funny video? This is one question researchers asked in an effort to understand whether we underestimate the pleasure we get from recalling mundane events from our past. We don't want to record the last conversation we had, but in a month, we'd rather read about it than watch a funny video.

Can You Break the Mood-Memory Cycle?

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on March 27, 2015 in Mental Mishaps
Does it ever seem that the only thoughts that come to mind are negative? You only remember the painful and sorrowful experiences from your life. Someone reminds you of something happy, but you struggle to remember it. And remembering that happy experience may make you feel worse rather than better.

How Does Practice Hardwire Long-Term Muscle Memory?

Why is it that once you've learned how to ride a bicycle or serve a tennis ball that you never forget the muscle memory involved in these actions? A team of neuroscientists recently pinpointed a new mechanism behind the consolidation of long-term motor memory.

Lifespan

By Mario D Garrett PhD on March 27, 2015 in iAge
Why do people confuse lifespan, with life expectancy, with average years of life and years expected to live?

Affairs: The Healing Process

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on March 26, 2015 in Fixing Families
Affairs are devastating on so many levels, but at its core it is about trust and loss. A map for moving through the normal healing process.

Recovering From Seasonal Shifts in Mood in Bipolar Disorder

By Elizabeth Brondolo Ph.D. on March 26, 2015 in Take Control
For people who have bipolar disorder, seasonal changes in mood can disrupt your health and well being. You can learn to recognize and address these seasonal shifts before they cause harm. We examine the effects of these shifts on motivation, thinking and identity. Early recognition can help you gain better control of bipolar spectrum disorder.

What No One Tells You About Avoidant Men

A subgroup of men with an avoidant attachment style suffer from a condition known as the Madonna-whore complex. Men with this complex assign Madonna status to some women and whore status to others.

Brian Williams, Journalism, and Celebrity Culture

When journalists start living in a celebrity bubble, bad things can happen. Just ask Brian Williams. His downfall reminds us of the malleability of memory, and it also poses a cautionary tale to all journalists, particularly to the trend in journalism education to promote "entrepreneurial" journalism -- teaching aspiring journalists to cultivate their own "brand".

10 Reasons You Should Go to Sleep Right Now

On the myriad benefits of sleep, glorious sleep.